Empowering Episcopalians and the next generation to care for creation

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Deb Sprague says: April 14, 2015 at 10:10 pm I am heartened to read this article about Episcopalians addressing the urgency of the climate crisis. One missing piece is any discussion of the power of divesting from fossil fuels. The World Council of Churches, the United Church of Christ, Anglican dioceses in Australia/New Zealand, Episcopal dioceses in the U.S., and many other religious bodies have spoken out about the moral and financial reasons to divest from fossil fuels and have made a commitment to divest (for a list of groups that have divested, visit http://gofossilfree.org/commitments/).Divesting from fossil fuels is a way of withdrawing the social license of the fossil fuel industry. And it is a moral act: if it is wrong to wreck the Earth, it is also wrong to profit from that wreckage. Unlike engaging in stockholder advocacy, divesting gets to the heart of the problem: the core business of the fossil fuel industry — extracting and burning coal, gas, and oil — needs to stop. In order to avert climate chaos, fossil fuels must stay in the ground and we must move as quickly as possible to clean, safe, renewable sources of energy, such as wind and sun.Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who knows first-hand about the spiritual, political, and moral power of divestment, has repeatedly urged divestment from fossil fuels. When will the Episcopal Church make a plan to divest from fossil fuels? I hope that we pass a strong divestment resolution at General Convention. Advocacy Peace & Justice, April 18, 2015 at 4:01 pm Thank you for this heartening article. I would like to share that the Diocese of Connecticut is proposing to General Convention the addition of a 6th question to the Baptismal Covenant: “Will you cherish the wondrous works of God and protect the beauty and integrity of all creation?” Please share the news of this proposal with your bishops and convention deputies and work with us to make sure it is carried. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY April 13, 2015 at 10:31 am Hi, I appreciate this article, but feel we’ve got to move beyond talk about recycling to the underlying issues of our economy based on consumption. Consumers see only a fraction of waste related to the products purchased. We need to advocate for zero waste systems, green chemistry and reclaiming government’s allegiance to the people over corporations! Josh Thomas says: Anne Rowthorn says: Josh Thomas says: May 8, 2015 at 9:56 am To Margaret Bullitt-Jonas:You go first and set the example. Give up what ever part of your lifestyle has at its root fossil fuels. Let’s start with your clothes. If any of your apparel is synthetic, get rid of it for it is derived from fossil fuels. If it is cotton, unless you hand planted it yourself, harvested it by hand, processed it without modern tools, sewed it by hand using thorns for needles and flint for cutting fabric then you are not setting a very good example. If you drive any vehicle that is not a Flintsone auto or one you personally crafted from recycled materials and powered by wind or gravity, then you are not setting a very good example. Electric vehicle you say? All the materials used to fabricate any vehicle of transport was born of the utilization of fossil fuels. Even the electricity used to power your electric car or bicycle is generated from fossil fuel. Oh, and the degradation of efficiency from using gasoline to the generation, transport, and storage (batteries) of electricity is significant. The pollution caused in the manufacture of batteries alone will cause you to shudder.If you are serious about divestment from fossil fuels, you will not possess anything that is derived from fossil fuels. Since you seem so adamant about this divestment from fossil fuels, you must already have an alternative source of energy in mind and in use. Please let the rest of us in on your secret.I personally believe that the existence of of all the earth’s resources were part of God’s plan for the benefit of mankind. Man is as much a part of nature as the polar bears that your ilk like to reference in your doomsday climate chaos hysteria. By the way, the polar bears are flourishing like never before and the caribou in Alaska are thriving in the shadow of the pipeline.Real science agrees that climate change is real and has been since creation began and will continue to happen despite our attempts to control it. What is being sold by the politicians is climate hysteria for the purpose of controlling the masses, not the preservation of the earth – God will take care of that as He always has.But I have no doubt that you will stay the course on your ‘group think’ journey and will have many followers. I will not be one of them. Comments are closed. April 13, 2015 at 12:37 pm Historical footnote, for the record: Howard knew within a couple of weeks that “this fragile earth, our island home” was a hit; Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin had landed on the moon only five years earlier. And Howard knew that the environmental theme also resonated quickly; the first Earth Day happened in 1970. But the thing he was proudest of in that prayer was that it’s the first in Anglican history to invoke the Blessed Virgin Mary as part of the consecration. By far his proudest moment in the overall, decades-long process of Prayer Book revision was winning final approval for the most important provision of all: the rubric on p. 13 terming the Holy Eucharist “the principal act of Christian worship on the Lord’s Day.” For the first time since the Reformation, Sunday Mass was restored to its rightful place in Anglican worship. This Church owes Howard Galley and everyone associated with Prayer Book revision the highest honor we can bestow. People think that what the ’79 Book did was get rid of “thees and thous,” but that was the least of it. The Commission, Bishops and Deputies gave us back our Communion with Christ, and we must never forget what they did. This Book made history because it made us Catholic again, in practice as well as thought. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA April 13, 2015 at 6:36 pm Fascinating information. I love Eucharistic Prayer C, the words and the ’79 BCP. Thanks for the wonderful insights. Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Josh Thomas says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR April 13, 2015 at 10:55 am Howard E. Galley, Jr. of the Church Army wrote those words, not Bishop Atkinson. I was present the first time they were used to consecrate bread and wine at the Eucharist, in a classroom at General Seminary, New York, in the summer of 1974. The Rev. Bill Coulter celebrated for my Church Army training class; Capt. Galley, Sr. Brooke Bushong and Capt. Tom Tull were there along with six lay ministry students, including Anthony Guillen, who was later ordained and became Hispanic/Latino Missioner at 815. Howard told us after Mass how he came to write that prayer, late one night at 815 after one of our evening classes. He wrote it all in one sitting, then refined it with Brooke and a few other friends a few nights later at a bar in Brooklyn Heights. He was Assistant to the Coordinator for Prayer Book Revision and General Editor of the new BCP, the day-to-day staffer who kept the wheels turning for the Standing Liturgical Commission in the runup to the General Convention of 1976, at which the Draft Prayer Book was provisionally approved for three years before winning final approval in 1979. Howard Galley wrote that prayer and no one else. On his behalf I respectfully request a correction. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Doug Desper says: By Lynette Wilson Posted Apr 13, 2015 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Students from Campbell Hall and St. Margaret’s Episcopal Schools observe elephant seals during mating season on the coast of Big Sur, California. From birth to death and everything in between, the full cycle of life was on display. Photo: Diocese of Los Angeles[Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians old and young often turn to the phrase “this fragile earth, our island home” when talking about stewardship of the planet. It comes from Eucharistic Prayer C, found in the Book of Common Prayer.A little further down the page, the prayer continues: “You made us the rulers of creation. But we turned against you, and betrayed your trust; and we turned against one another.”Over the last 21 days, Episcopalians have been participating in 30 Days of Action, a campaign designed and initiated by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society to engage individuals and congregations in a conversation about climate change. (The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission.)The campaign, which began with a live, webcast forum on March 24, culminates on Earth Day, April 22. Resources and activities for the campaign include advocacy days, bulletin inserts, stories, sermons and outdoor excursions.The 30 Days of Action, as well as the fifth of the Five Marks of Mission, are a call to action to regain that trust and to come together in community to care for creation.As James Pickett, a climate-change activist and young adult from the Diocese of Western Massachusetts, makes clear in a recent blog post, unless Anglicans and Episcopalians take seriously the fifth of the Five Marks of Mission, “To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation, and sustain and renew the life of the earth,” the other four marks are irrelevant.“If we don’t treasure creation, the other marks of mission cannot be accomplished,” wrote Pickett.Just talking about climate change and its related justice issues doesn’t cut it, according to Pickett and others; it’s about living the marks and putting faith into action.Last fall, Pickett and other Episcopalians joined the more than 300,000 people from across the country and the world on the streets of New York for the People’s Climate March, the largest demonstration for climate action in history.As evidenced in the activities and resources included and developed for the 30-day campaign, it’s impossible to have a conversation about climate change and not talk about justice issues implicit in the Five Marks of Mission.“When The Episcopal Church adopted the Five Marks of Mission, I was struck by the practical nature of the language and its action-oriented invitation,” said lifelong environmentalist Bronwyn Clark Skov, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s officer for youth ministries. “I am especially thankful for the specificity of the Fifth Mark of Mission, ‘to strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.’”“It could be argued that this area of ministry is an undercurrent of the Baptismal Covenant, but these newer words open greater possibilities for imagining our role as Christian citizens caring for the earth, our home,” she said. “This is a wonderful teaching point when engaged with young people and discussing how their Christian identity might impact the choices they make.”An environmentalist since her father encouraged her as a child, Skov recalled learning about recycling early on.“I remember sorting newspapers to drop off at the once-a-month newspaper drive. I was taught to rinse out tin cans, remove both ends and carefully flatten the can on the rug on the kitchen floor, so as not to damage the linoleum beneath the woven fabric,” she said. “When engaged in ministry with young people, I name and claim this lifelong habit and invite young people to join me in my commitment to reduce, recycle and reuse those items that will not easily biodegrade in a landfill. This behavior has become a part of who I am, a piece of my personal identity.”The Five Marks of Mission begin to address how Episcopalians can become environmental stewards and turn toward one another in community, rather than betraying the earth and turning away from one another, as the eucharistic prayer states.Children and teenagers especially feel empowered by the language used in the marks, said Skov. She refers to them as a way to practice the vows made at baptism, and she invites young people to name and claim the ways in which they are already living some of the marks.“The beauty of the fifth mark, treasuring the earth with intentionality, is a place where we can engage in our communities in partnership across denominational, religious and political divides,” she said. “Mission and ministry in this area [are] easy to embrace with school-age humans as they learn about the environment in classroom settings and can then see the intersection of their secular experience in the world with their values as a member of a community of faith.”More than 1,000 high school-aged students attended last year’s Episcopal Youth Event in Pennsylvania, where climate change was among the issues discussed and where youth were becoming agents of transformation.Americans’ views on climate change vary from state to state, town to town and sometimes family member to family member. Climate change is an increasingly charged political issue that often pits conservatives against liberals. At the same time, religious communities across the spectrum have joined in the call to reduce carbon emissions and to treat climate change as a moral issue.In an interview with The Guardian that ran on the day of the climate-change-crisis forum in March, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori described climate change as a moral challenge already threatening the livelihood and survival of people in the developing world.“It is certainly a moral issue in terms of the impacts on the poorest and most vulnerable around the world already,” she said.Across the board, Episcopalians are taking that moral challenge seriously, including by contributing to the 30 Days of Action.As the Rev. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas, missioner for creation care in the Diocese of Western Massachusetts, put it in a sermon written for the Sunday after Easter: “Climate change isn’t just an ‘environmental’ issue – it’s a ‘civilization’ issue. It’s not just about polar bears – it’s about where our grandchildren will find clean water. It’s about how societies will handle growing epidemics of infectious diseases such as malaria, cholera and dengue fever. It’s about where masses of people will go as rising seas drive them from their homes or when the rains don’t fall and the fields turn to dustbowls. It’s about hungry, thirsty people competing for scarce resources and reverting to violence, civil unrest or martial law in the struggle to survive.”Formation resources focused on creation careThe Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s Lifelong Christian Formation Office and other clergy and lay Episcopalians active on climate-change issues have compiled comprehensive resources for environmental liturgy, including the 30 Days of Action.“The formation offices have been talking about climate change and caring for the environment with children and their families for years,” said the Rev. Shannon Kelly, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s acting missioner for campus and young adult ministries.“Young people encounter caring for the environment every day as they talk about recycling, ‘upcycling’ and conservation in their schools, at home and at church. Bringing this important subject into the life of the church and into the programs creates space for the children and adults to think, pray and experience how caring for the environment is caring for God’s creation.”Environmental Stewardship Fellow Cindy Coe works in the garden with students of the Episcopal School of Knoxville. Photo courtesy of Episcopal School of KnoxvilleIn Tennessee, exploring nature is becoming an integral component of learning to read.In early June, the Diocese of East Tennessee will offer “Reading Camp Knoxville” to third- and fourth-graders who are both living in poverty and struggling to learn to read. As part of the program, the children, who come from urban areas, will go on afternoon field trips, hiking in wooded areas working in gardens, said Cindy Coe, who is on the planning committee and working with afternoon extracurricular activities.“All of these activities are geared to fostering a sense of connectedness and appreciation of the natural world. The best way to do this is to actually get children outdoors, exploring nature,” said Coe, who last year received an environmental-stewardship fellowship from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society.Through the fellowship, Coe is working to develop the next generation of leaders.“This is not something that can be done by ‘book learning’ only,” she said. “Activities that encourage children to look closely at natural objects, mapping activities and identifying a special place outdoors are all effective ways to help children bond with nature. If a child is able to develop a bond with nature, chances are that the child will grow up with an appreciation of the environment and will care for the environment as an adult.”Coe is working on developing new resources to introduce creation care to children and youth in The Episcopal Church, for use in camps, schools and parishes.She hopes, she said, that all Christian formation programs in The Episcopal Church eventually will include some aspect of environmental stewardship.In Virginia, Coe also is working with the planning team of Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Greenwood, Virginia, to design a vacation Bible school program based on care for creation and the Fifth Mark of Mission called “Earth, Our Island Home.”The parish takes seriously the words “this fragile Earth, our island home” in Eucharistic Prayer C, said Coe.“So the concept of creation care has a special meaning for the parish,” she said. “ Each day, children will participate in worship, hear a story based on creation care and take part in noncompetitive games designed to introduce environmental stewardship.”Arts and crafts will embrace environmental stewardship, as children will be offered objects to “upcycle” and make into new creations, she said. “New life will be an important theme of the camp, connecting themes of recycling, composting and gardening with the Christian story of resurrection and new life in Christ.”In the Diocese of Los Angeles, where the Rev. Andrew K. Barnett serves as the bishop’s chair for environmental studies, young people are learning to care for creation by learning to love it.“I think that we will not fight to save a thing we do not love, by which I mean in order to empower people to care for ‘this fragile earth our island home,’ we first have to find that meaningful and valuable in a deep way, and talking about it doesn’t really cut it,” said Barnett, before the March 24 forum.“So I have really made a significant priority of taking kids outside. So we take these wilderness retreats to places like Big Sur, Lake Lopez, Yosemite and Catalina Island. We have games, we go kayaking, we go hiking, we do service projects,” he said.“The kids love it, they just love it. They light up because they are doing exactly what we need, which is community, connection and reference in these incredible, awe-inspiring places. So you don’t have to say this is important, this is beautiful, because it is immediately present or it’s just in your bones.”Barnett serves as school chaplain at Campbell Hall Episcopal School in the Diocese of Los Angeles, where Bishop J. Jon Bruno and the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society partnered to host the March 24 forumBarnett talks to the students about climate change in stark terms, incorporating research and science — not to exaggerate, he said, but to name the severity of the threat.“Kids can handle that truth. They don’t like things being sugar-coated. They prefer: ‘This is going to be the biggest challenge of your generation,’” said Barnett. “Our generation has abjectly failed in our attempt to reduce emissions. We talked about it a lot, we have a lot of meetings, but emissions keep going up.“If you fail at this task, most other tasks won’t matter, because climate change affects almost everything worth caring about and, other than nuclear annihilation, presents the greatest threat to humanity that we’ve ever known.”Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story misattributed the authorship of the words “this fragile Earth, our island home,” which appear in Eucharistic Prayer C. They were written by Howard E. Galley Jr.— Lynette Wilson is a reporter and editor for Episcopal News Service. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Empowering Episcopalians and the next generation to care for creation Press Release Service Margaret Bullitt-Jonas says: Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Bill Simon says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Deborah S. Taliaferro says: April 13, 2015 at 12:00 pm What Bishop Atkinson must have done was to quote Howard Galley’s phrase (and perhaps celebrate Mass using it) so often at Emmanuel, Greenwood, that in time people began to think he must have written it. Besides Fr. Guillen, I have another witness who was present during the creation of this prayer: Sr. Brooke Bushong’s partner Patti O’Kane, who still lives in Brooklyn Heights and can supply details about Howard, Brooke and others meeting for a drink a few nights after he composed the prayer. He read it to them, and they were the first persons to ever hear it; he asked for feedback and they gave him some. A few days later Fr. Bill Coulter gave it its world premiere in a little room at GTS. Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab April 17, 2015 at 12:53 pm While care for the natural creation (our island home) is being sought — and very rightly so — let us remember that there is a holocaust of the human family as seen through abortion in this country. Most abortions are not for the extremely rare incidence of a threat to the mother or the in vitro child’s life, which means that most abortions are performed for the sake of convenience. A past General Convention rejected the idea that such a decision for convenience or gender selection is acceptable. However, the left-leaning politics of the day dissuade many of our spiritual and pastoral leaders from stating that “freedom to choose” is a morally bankrupt basis to decide life from death. Quite the opposite shows itself; even with one seminary dean’s proud announcement that “abortion is a blessing”. The politics of gender won out over the call to be a steward of creation.This Church hasn’t awakened to the unborn creation and their vulnerability at the hands of situation ethics, gender politics, crisis of convenience, and ignorance. The unborn, as a part of the creation, are at much greater risk than many parts of the creation. God called us to be stewards of the whole of creation, not to be arbiters of the value of the life therein. Stewards. Caregivers. Guardians.Fellow stewards: where are our unwed mother supports? Where are our adoption efforts? Where are our homes for the abandoned? The track record of the Episcopal Church is abysmal in this. We are behind – and the MDGs have room to embrace better care of the unborn, untimely born, and vulnerable women. Are we stewards or arbiters? Watch our efforts and decide.Thankfully, many of today’s parents get to see the new life that is in the womb through imagining — and it is nearly impossible to defend such a casual and flippant idea as “freedom to choose”.It’s hard to deny the value of that tiny creation – someone that God has hidden away in trust to we who are called stewards of the WHOLE of creation.Maybe one day our Church will catch up. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Comments (9) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Environment & Climate Change In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

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Millions take to Haiti’s streets

first_imgThree million Haitians throughout their country of 11 million hit the streets Oct. 17 to protest the government’s corruption and its waste of billions of dollars of aid from Venezuela.Cops broke up these protests by firing into the crowds and using massive amounts of tear gas.  People in the streets responded by throwing rocks, building barricades of burning tires and running but not dispersing until they made their political points over poverty wages and government corruption.On Oct. 31, a funeral was held in Port-au-Prince for seven mostly young protesters killed by the cops: Jean Kenson Rosier, Dieubéni Casimir, Francky Duval, Junelson Pierre, Jhonny Mervil, Christelle Alexandre and Mercidieu Baptiste. The cops attacked mourners gathered outside the church of Our Lady of Perpetual Help with tear gas and ammunition.When the funeral service restarted, attendees learned that cops had killed two mourners outside the church.  The crowd grew so angry that they decided to take the caskets and march to the Champ de Mars, the site of the presidential palace which was destroyed in the 2010 earthquake.People blocked streets and set up burning barricades. It took the cops hours to disperse the protest, which disrupted Port-au-Prince for much of the day. During these protests nine people were shot and wound up in the hospital, according to André Michel of the Democratic and Popular Sector.‘We’ll mobilize in the whole country and the diaspora’Millions of Haitians have taken to the streets, but with little coverage in the press or even YouTube about exactly why they have come out so massively and militantly and how they feel about the current situation.The progressive Haitian newspaper Haïti-Liberté published a statement Nov. 7 from the assembly of mass organizations. Here are some excerpts:“The Assembly of Political, Labor Union, and Popular Organizations denounces with all its strength that the Haitian government has sent police bandits to carry out repressive acts against the people. We recall that on Oct. 17, 2018, about three million people nationwide took to the streets to demand the departure of the group in power along with the arrest of the thieves of the PetroCaribe fund.“Before Oct. 17, President Jovenel Moïse visited several police stations to encourage police officers to repress the population. And just as the indicted president wanted, during the Oct. 17 mobilization, police assassins fired on the people in several departments. More than seven demonstrators died and more than 50 compatriots were wounded by the bullets of police bandits.“Once again, during the funeral of our compatriots in Belair, the police’s criminal mercenaries struck again. Several comrades were injured by gunshots and tear-gas. The criminals didn’t even spare people inside the church from tear-gas. Even the priest who was presiding over the funeral had to leave the church to escape from the gas.“While saluting the courage of our compatriots who took the lead, the Assembly of Political, Labor Union, and Popular Organizations condemns with all its might the repression carried out by Jovenel Moïse and the CSPN [High Council of the National Police] by sending police criminals against demonstrators. In this sense, we call on the victims to take to court the indicted Jovenel Moïse and the entire CSPN.“This repressive and anti-democratic conduct shows clearly that the Tèt Kale snake is far from dead …  The remedy to the Tèt Kale snake is constant mobilization [Tèt Kale political party heads Haiti’s government. — GD]. These repressive acts don’t scare us. We’ll continue mobilizing everywhere in the country and overseas to crush the head of the snake and achieve the arrest and judgment of all the thieves who stole PetroCaribe funds.“That’s why on Nov. 2, we’ll warm up with a Petro Gede mobilization. On Nov. 18, we’ll mobilize in the four corners of the country and in the diaspora. On Nov. 19 and 20, there will be a PetroBlockage, the country will be brought to a standstill, until this ends.”Gede is the Voodoo day of the dead, corresponding to Halloween.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Texas freeze – Rich get richer, workers suffer

first_imgHoustonAn unprecedented winter storm hit Texas Feb. 15, bringing subfreezing temperatures. One week later, huge sections of the population are still without power, heat and/or water.Houston skyline glows, while millions suffer subfreezing temperatures without heat or water amidst preventable power outages, Feb. 15Across major cities — such as Houston, Austin and San Antonio — empty corporate skyscrapers remained lit, while millions were in the dark with no power or running water. It took public outcry to make officials power down buildings not in use and divert energy to hospitals and firefighters.People in Texas are not only struggling to recover from this freeze, but from previous hurricanes and floods caused by global warming that produces extreme precipitation at all temperatures. This is compounded further by the COVID crisis in a state with one of the largest interlocking systems of prisons, jails and detention centers; Texas is second only to California.Many people have frozen to death, and deaths are likely undercounted as more bodies will be found after the thaw. The Texas Tribune reported Feb. 18 that nearly half the state was experiencing water disruptions. Thousands had pipes burst from the freeze which did tremendous damage to their homes and apartments. Add boil-water notices to this, when many families could not access heat, and you’ll understand what a struggle it has been to survive.After months of high unemployment, record evictions and 500,000 virus deaths, we have a deregulated energy sector making record profits off our misery. Billionaire owner of the Dallas Cowboys — and noted benefactor of police — Jerry Jones saw his natural gas company, Comstock Resources, Inc., score record profits. Comstock’s Chief Financial Officer Roland Burns said, “This week is like hitting the jackpot with some of these incredible prices. Frankly, we were able to sell at super premium prices for a material amount of production.” (Dallas Morning News, Feb. 17) Meanwhile, some Texans are reporting monthly electric bills as high as $17,000. (NY Post, Feb. 19) While the people suffered, Texas Senator Ted Cruz fled to Cancun, Mexico, to provide his family with better living conditions. This, given his strong anti-migrant positions and legislative actions, is ironic to say the least. Ironic too is that Democrat Nancy Pelosi in September said of Cruz’s party: “The country needs a strong Republican Party. It’s done so much for our country.” (MSNBC, Sept. 30, 2020)Why the Texas grid failedIn a state long held hostage by oil and gas, the power grids failed because of lack of regulation. “Texas’ secessionist inclinations have at least one modern outlet: the electric grid. There are three grids in the Lower 48 states: the Eastern Interconnection, the Western Interconnection — and Texas. The Texas grid is called ERCOT, and it is run by an agency of the same name — the Electric Reliability Council of Texas. In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Federal Power Act, which charged the Federal Power Commission with overseeing interstate electricity sales. By not crossing state lines, Texas utilities avoided being subjected to federal rules. Freedom from federal regulation was a cherished goal — more so because Texas had no regulation until the 1970s.” (Texas Tribune, Feb. 8, 2011)Texas Gov. Gregg Abbott peddled false claims on Fox News that renewable energy sources like wind were to blame; he later had to walk back those false claims off the air. (Yahoo News, Feb. 17) Abbott’s lies still live in the minds of millions, despite evidence that it was nonrenewable energy sources and deregulation to blame for the blackout.ERCOT’s Senior Director Dan Woodfin cited “frozen instruments at natural gas, coal and even nuclear facilities, as well as limited supplies of natural gas. Natural gas pressure in particular is one reason power is coming back slower than expected.” (Bloomberg, Feb. 15) Chris Tomlinson reported for the Houston Chronicle Feb. 18, “Texas electricity generators did not want to spend the moment to build resilient equipment because it cut into their profits.”The compounding crises of capital in Texas illustrate that organizing economies around profits for a few, rather than what is necessary to sustain human life, comes at the violent expense of oppressed peoples.Climate, sanctions and colonization Empty grocery shelves during the freeze were compared to the situation in Venezuela. Not mentioned is that as many as 40,000 Venezuelans have died because it is one of 39 countries sanctioned by the U.S., which makes it nearly impossible for many to access food and medicine. (SanctionsKill.org) The same entities starving people abroad are willing to let us starve at home.The combined factors of national oppression and climate crisis produced the catastrophic disasters from hurricanes Maria in Puerto Rico and Katrina in Louisiana. Scholar Daniel Immerwahr explains: “[In late 2017] Hurricane Maria slammed into Puerto Rico, taking out the island’s power grid, water system and communications. It also exposed the parlous state of affairs in the United States’ largest remaining colony. Although Luis Muñoz Marín’s strategy of using tax loopholes to draw mainland corporations to the island had dramatically improved Puerto Rico’s economy in the 1950s and for decades after, Congress removed those loopholes in the 1990s, triggering corporate flight, economic collapse and an exodus of employable Puerto Ricans to the mainland. By the time Maria struck, more than 60% of the island’s remaining inhabitants were on Medicare or Medicaid. Because the federal government funds those programs less generously in Puerto Rico than on the mainland, the commonwealth found itself accruing unsustainable debt to pay its bills.“The hurricane turned crisis into catastrophe. Puerto Ricans were knocked back a century as they made do without phones or electricity. Doctors were forced to perform surgeries by flashlight, city dwellers to search desperately for clean water. Hurricane Maria struck at nearly the same time as two other storms hit the mainland, Hurricane Harvey in Texas and Hurricane Irma (which first struck the U.S. Virgin Islands) in Florida. The difference in response was palpable. Though Puerto Ricans were far more likely to die from storm damage, they saw fewer federal personnel, markedly less media coverage and only a fraction of the charitable giving.” (Immerwahr, “How to Hide an Empire,” Macmillan, 2019)Hurricane Katrina showed the capitalist state disregard people of oppressed nationalities, especially Black and Brown people. Many Katrina evacuees ended up in Houston’s Astrodome, facing infectious diseases from being tightly packed in. We saw organized abandonment go hand–in–hand with the organized violence of police and white supremacists, while the media gave justification by overreporting “looting.” (“Floodlines” podcast, March 2020)Incarcerated people were not evacuated; they were left to contend with flooded cells and floating fecal matter without relief. There is a reoccurring practice across the U.S. South to leave people in prison during disasters. Texas prisons around the Brazos River flood often; those inside are left to deal with the conditions.Capitalism creates unnatural catastrophesMutual aid networks in Texas were in motion long before this crisis froze the state. These networks are able to redistribute funds and supplies quicker than local and state governments, although many groups are operating at or over capacity. They are keeping people alive, while the capitalist state has left people to die.All the government lacks is the will to quickly act — because their real function is to serve profit.In Cuba, where the working class successfully seized the means of production in 1959, response to climate events like hurricanes is marked by preparedness and prevention of suffering.According to Gail Reed — executive editor of the MEDICC Review, a peer-reviewed journal about health and medicine in Latin American, Caribbean and other developing countries, and a journalist who has spent more than three decades in Cuba — the Cuban Government gives local communities seven days to prepare for the worst as a hurricane approaches. Cubans practice preparedness drilling often, in every province, city, town and village.“These constant drills are coupled with an integrated response from local fire departments, health, transportation and other vital public services. Above all, Cuba places tremendous emphasis on educating the population to keep communities and families, particularly the most vulnerable, safe.” (Telesur, Aug. 28, 2017)Cuba, despite being under U.S. economic blockade for decades, offered to send 1,500 medical professionals to help the people of New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina. Former President George W. Bush quickly rejected the offer, letting people suffer.We will continue to see the organized abandonment of workers and oppressed peoples in future crises. With last year having produced the greatest number of tropical storms on record in a single season, we on the Gulf Coast know it’s not a matter of if, but when the next catastrophic climate disaster strikes. Both the Democratic and Republican parties in the U.S. are servants of capital. They have time and again demonstrated they will leave us and the Global South for dead, so capitalists can chase another dollar. We are called to meet their top-down organized violence and organized abandonment with bottom-up organization that prioritizes people over profits. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Limerick in the eye of a sex industry storm

first_imgWhatsApp Previous articleOpinion – Game Over Ball BurstNext articleDJ Greg Wilson to play Limerick Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie BusinessNewsCommunityCrime & CourtLocal NewsLimerick in the eye of a sex industry stormBy Staff Reporter – August 30, 2013 5443 TAGSCrimecriminalDorasfeaturedfull-imageIrelandMusic LimerickprostitutionRed LightRomaniansex industryTurn Off the Red Light Facebook Advertisement Doras concerns about ongoing safety and wellbeing of residents in Direct Provision during Covid-19 Pandemic Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR No vaccines in Limerick yet center_img Email Twitter Gardaí step up operations to tackle Limerick dognappers Woman arrested and €72,000 seized in Westbury Walk in Covid testing available in Limerick from Saturday 10th April by Andrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up IT IS home to boutiques, bars and restaurants offering culinary delights from around the world. A little coffee culture haven sits at one end while the other is occupied by doctors, dentists, solicitors and professionals.But there’s another aspect of commercial life in Limerick’s city centre that’s not quite so socially acceptable.Since 2009, young women have occupied street corners with peering eyes behind doors and blinds watching their every move.They’re skilled practitioners of the oldest profession – a profession that local business owners want to see moved on.Many theories abound as to the identity of the designer, creator and sign-writer who placed  three bold notices on parking poles indicating that unassuming punters had entered a “Red Light District”.For the most part, it was met with smile or a smart comment but for legitimate local traders it was yet another reminder that the area is at the centre of the city’s burgeoning vice trade and it’s a situation they are no longer prepared to tolerate.In the wake of the last week’s “red light district” signs, the focus of the national media switched to the streets of Limerick.Down Catherine Street, two young women are sitting on a step in the doorway of an old Georgian building. They’re chatting and sharing some takeaway food as they look at the world passing by.But this picture of urban life is disturbed when two uniformed gardai approach and the women scurry.Last month, gardaí raided the building as part of their crackdown on prostitution. They found 18 Romanian women and a number of men, some of them their husbands, inside the house. This was a brothel.The women, aged between 18 and 36, come from Babadag area of Romania just outside Bucharest.Interpol intelligence has established the routes taken and methods used to get these women into Ireland.Inside the building, however, there is one woman who controls the operation. She is a 40-year-old Romanian who has been in Ireland for the past 12 years. She is a married mother of three but her marital status is far from conventional.She runs one of the more lucrative prostitution operations in Limerick city centre while her husband, who is based in Romania, brings the girls to Ireland.The ‘Madame’ has already been prosecuted for organising and living off the earnings of prostitution in Limerick for which she was fined and received a suspended jail sentence. She doesn’t engage in prostitution herself but she facilitates the operation by acting as translator and setting the girls up with accommodation.Her children do not live in Limerick as they stay with a relative elsewhere in Munster.“She speaks very good English. If you passed her walking down the street, you wouldn’t associate her with prostitution, but it is she who facilitates the whole operation. The girls have very poor English so she does the wheeling and dealing,” explained a source working close to the vice trade.“She negotiates the price and sorts out phone numbers and she tells the punters where and when to turn up.”The services provided by women working as prostitutes in Limerick are advertised on an escort website where they occupy the site with up to 50 other women offering sex for sale in Limerick.Online rates range from €80 to €130 for a half an hour of full sex with these girls, while others can charge up to €250“When the online business is quiet, these girls work on the streets where a half an hour of full sex is available from anything between €30 and €50,” added the source.The women can make anything between €500 and €1,000 a night and every morning the cash is wired from different Internet cafes mostly through the Western Union facility. In this case, the women are allowed retain up to €100 each week which goes to a central fund for rent, bills and food.“If you have ten or 12 women wiring small enough amounts of money, then there is nothing that can be done as it is a legitimate route of transferring funds”, explained the source.“Because the money is not staying in a bank account here, it is hard to seize. Western Union is obliged to report any suspicious transactions or large transfers but these people are clever and if you have ten or twelve different women wiring different amounts of money then there is nothing that can be done as it is a legitimate route of transferring funds”.“It is a long and painstaking process but in order to crack this and get to the organised criminals behind prostitution, you have to follow the money…and in order to do this we have to get the girls to cooperate which is not always easy,” added the source.The sex industry in Limerick went through a major crisis in recent times when some of the street prostitutes offered sex without condoms.This created increased health concerns and highlighted the continued need for services offered by Doras Luimni, the Limerick-based organisation for migrants in the Mid-West, which is part of the ‘Turn off the Red Light’ campaign to end prostitution.The HSE also became involved in a recent case involving a pregnant Romanian prostitute who, despite being arrested several times by gardaí while heavily pregnant, continued to work up to three weeks before her baby was born.The baby girl born six months ago was put into care shortly after her birth and remains under the care of the health executive.Gardai are also monitoring the activities of another Romanian girl working in Limerick who is believed to be four months pregnant.“At any one time, there could be six Romanian men in the building working as security guards. The building is divided into bedsits and the men remain in the sitting room while their wives are in the bedroom with customers, on stand-by in case anything goes wrong,” the source explainedMore than 40 brothels have been raided or closed in the last number of years and one high-profile figure is currently before the courts having operated and lived off the profits of prostitution in Limerick. He was granted legal aid despite having amassed wealth through properties in Europe and cash from busy “lunchtime brothels” in the city.According to garda intelligence, women soliciting for the purpose of prostitution, as well as the running of organised brothels, hit an all-time high in Limerick in 2011 when the city accounted for over 30 per cent of the convictions recorded in Ireland.The Garda response has always been in the public focus with varied opinions as to the level of success with their actions.Senior gardai  say they are tackling on-street and brothel prostitution in Limerick and while this achieves some publicity, its effects are is limited in terms of targeting the people behind the business.Not every aspect of the Garda policing of the vice trade is as obvious as the on-street or brothel raids and 21 men were prosecuted for soliciting on the city’s street as part of Operation Freewheel in 2011With teenagers and young women arriving from Brazil, Portugal and Romania as well as other parts of Eastern Europe, the newcomers live in apartments and some even stay for long periods in hotels, despite having no visible source of income.Doras Luimní runs a street outreach programme in conjunction with the Red Ribbon project providing support to women affected by prostitution in Limerick city.According to Anti-Trafficking Officer, Patricia Stapleton most of these women are young and from Eastern European backgrounds, mainly Romanian.“These women work in all weathers, seven nights a week. During our outreach work, we see the male controllers, handlers and pimps who often prevent outreach workers from engaging with vulnerable women, some as young as 18 years of age.”Last week, gardaí in Limerick applied for Anti Social Behaviour Orders (ASBOs) in respect of eight women from Romania allegedly working as prostitutes in Limerick.However Doras Luimni has criticised the ‘public order’ approach which it claims is a “completely inappropriate” way of addressing the problem.The ongoing issue of prostitution in Limerick was also highlighted last week when a number of traffic signs were mysteriously altered to read ‘Red Light District’, before being quickly removed by the local authority.Cleverly designed to mimic the underlying signs, they read ‘Red Light District, in effect from Monday to Saturday, 6pm to 4am’.The stickers were immediately removed by local authority but local traders fear that business is being severely damaged by the ongoing issue of on-street prostitution.“I’m in a Georgian building and they are at my door at half past six sitting on my steps, I know my neighbours who are open later than I am have called the gardaí because apparently by 6.30pm, a whole other life takes over this area,” said Grainne Vaughan who runs an accessory boutique on Catherine Street.Limerick’s fashion quarter sits among these streets that have the underlying issues with the sex trade.One shop owner said that shoppers who know the streets to be in a red light area will avoid bringing their custom.“The prostitutes are bold and blatant and harass any man they see on the street. It is getting worse and we are continually on to gardaí”.The shop owner described how some of the prostitutes who have been in the area for some time are not as bad as the newer women as they “harass every man who moves on the street”.Last week, former Munster and Irish rugby player Jerry Flannery made national headlines when he said that if some of the men using prostitutes washed more regularly and bought new clothes,  they might not to have to pay for sex.But the problem is much more complex than that.For those dedicated to tackling the serious issue of prostitution in Limerick, the constant and biggest challenge is to prosecute the criminal gangs behind an industry that is worth millions of euro a year.“Another really scary concern of ours is if the local criminal gangs realised just how much money can be made from prostitution, they would get involved as it doesn’t carry the same risks as drug dealing and is so much harder to prosecute”, one Garda source said. Print Rape Crisis welcomes publication of O’Malley reportlast_img read more

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Phylloceuticals to Deliver Affordable Medicine to Underserved Areas

first_imgLocal NewsBusiness Twitter Facebook Pinterest WhatsApp TAGS  Twitter Phylloceuticals to Deliver Affordable Medicine to Underserved Areascenter_img Pinterest Facebook DENVER, Feb. 3, 2021 /PRNewswire/ — Phylloceuticals, a privately-held, global technology company dedicated to providing medicine to underserved areas of the world, announced its formation today. The privately held company released details on their PhAAST™ platform, which uses plant-made pharmaceuticals to enable regions and countries to quickly ramp up production of much-needed biologics with public/private and private investment. PhAAST™, or Pharmaceuticals As A Service Technology, is a unique concept that uses a plant-made technology which offers rapid development of biopharmaceutical products at lower capital expense and operating cost. Drug development and manufacturing can happen fast (PhAAST™), enabling countries and regions to quickly develop reliable supply chains for needed biologics medicines. Rather than relying upon the traditional engineering and construction or CDMO models to deliver manufactured drugs, Phylloceuticals’ model helps nucleate teams to produce independently, with a proven production system and ongoing support from the Phylloceuticals team. Phyllo, which is a Greek work meaning ‘leaf,’ signifies the plant-made technology which fuels the PhAAST™ delivery. For more than three decades, the founding partners of Phylloceuticals have worked across the pharmaceutical industry. Their separate career paths have brought them together on a variety of award-winning projects. The strength and deep experience of the cross-functional team lies at the heart of the Phylloceuticals model. The company has a complete portfolio of skillsets, including drug development, regulatory strategy and enablement, full scale manufacturing and marketing support for company and product launch. PhAAST™ also includes groundbreaking data analytics, and top-level AI-enabled process control. This platform fosters continuous improvement and can be monitored from anywhere for a reproducible model that can be replicated across regions and markets underserved currently by large pharma. Phylloceuticals CEO Bill Brydges says: “In regions such as Vietnam, Africa, the MENA region and even Australia and Singapore, commonly prescribed biologics like rituximab for lymphoma and inflammatory diseases may currently be in short supply, or even unavailable to all but the wealthiest. COVID-19 highlighted supply chain difficulties for these regions. The need to rapidly ramp up and supply needed drugs for their own populations was the inspiration behind the formation of Phylloceuticals.” The rising demand for high-quality recombinant therapeutics has driven development of cell-based manufacturing systems for improved production yields. Yet cell-based systems require much higher capital investments and operating costs to finance. Protein therapies now treat a vast number of indications including cancer, diabetes, and inflammatory diseases, and provide a rapid response vaccine platform. Monoclonal antibodies represent the largest market segment at 40% of global market. Other categories include vaccines, antibody drug conjugates, enzyme replacement, diabetes treatments including recombinant insulin, interferons and blood factors. Phylloceutical CSO Barry Holtz, PhD says: “When you bring us an opportunity, feasibility data will be available for you very rapidly. Using our plant-made pharmaceutical (PMP) platform, scale-up is rapid and predictable from early stage process development. The upstream process is always the same and much more cost effective than traditional bioreactor based systems. We have designed a next-gen PMP system incorporating newer plant culture automation, real time AI analytics and the latest in downstream improvements for biologics manufacturing. The time to market is greatly reduced using these new systems and as a result of our years of experience in full-scale manufacturing.” “Prepare for some exciting news in the near future,” – Phylloceutical spokesperson Susan Stipa. The individuals on the Phylloceuticals team have been improving lives for forty years with a variety of skill sets, providing creative therapeutic solutions to difficult medical problems and solving complex challenges for biologics manufacturers. “The experience, expertise, and intellectual property that each of the Phylloceutical partners bring to the table is unsurpassed and highly complementary and their dedication to doing good, by helping underserved areas of the world gain access to the drugs they need, is truly admirable,” says Stipa. The news on the formation of Phylloceuticals was welcomed throughout the industry. “We believe the formation of such a novel new company to address the current weaknesses in the pharmaceutical supply chain couldn’t come at a better moment, says Dr. Sancha Salgueiro, CEO of Chart Bio in Denmark. “I know all of the partners personally, from their prior careers, and to see them collaboratively establish this new method of effectively delivering medicine to those with major unmet drug supply needs, is a tremendous step forward for our industry,” says Dr.Bernard Guay of BGC Pharma Consulting. Phylloceuticals will establish joint development agreements with investors, regions and clients. Other terms of the company formation were not disclosed. About Phylloceuticals Phylloceuticals is a global technology company dedicated to providing affordable medicine to underserved areas of the world. Founded in 2021, Phylloceuticals is rapidly building a reputation for solving complex technical challenges in the most demanding environments — and allowing needed drugs to be produced locally, with ongoing support from our team. Phylloceuticals uses a plant-made technology which offers lower overall investment and a much quicker response time for drug development. Drug development and manufacturing happen fast (PhAAST™), empowering underserved areas of the world to gain access to biologics medicines that other areas of the world take for granted. Phylloceuticals is not a CDMO. We are not a biologics or pharma company. Our mission is to nucleate, enable, and help construct companies in these traditionally underserved regions and underserved markets to manufacture biologics with our plant-made technology. We call it PhAAST™ – Pharmaceuticals as a Service Technology. About PhAAST™ PhAAST™ (Pharmaceuticals as a Service Technology) means: Lower cost facilities and operationsContinuous improvements in plant-made pharmaceutical manufacturing systemsRapid process and product development of new pharmaceutical candidatesContinuously optimized product vectors for an expanding product pipeline and increased production yield.Management and staff recruitment and trainingCentralized expert data management by automated quality control systems and data security through block chain technologyRegulatory support and clinical trial structure and managementDefinition of geographic regions for marketing products, with a special emphasis on bringing biologics manufacturing to underserved areasAssistance with obtaining capitalMarketing launch assistance for new companies For more information on Phylloceuticals, please visit http://phylloceuticals.com and connect with Phylloceuticals on LinkedIn. Media Contact: Susan Stipa, 484.883.8808, McDay|CGLife, mc-day.com Technical Contact: Barry Holtz, Ph.D., +1.281.794.1436, [email protected] View original content: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/phylloceuticals-to-deliver-affordable-medicine-to-underserved-areas-301221246.html SOURCE Phylloceuticals Previous articleMahomes the rare quarterback with no weaknessNext articleAP Sportlight Digital AIM Web Support WhatsApp By Digital AIM Web Support – February 3, 2021 last_img read more

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Insolvency Proceedings Maintainable Even If Winding Up Petition Is Pending Against Corporate Debtor: Supreme Court

first_imgTop StoriesInsolvency Proceedings Maintainable Even If Winding Up Petition Is Pending Against Corporate Debtor: Supreme Court LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK1 March 2021 8:58 PMShare This – xThe Supreme Court held that a petition either under Section 7 or Section 9 of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code is an independent proceeding which is unaffected by winding up proceedings that may be filed against the same company.The bench comprising Justices RF Nariman and BR Gavai observed that a secured creditor stands outside the winding up and can realise its security de hors winding…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court held that a petition either under Section 7 or Section 9 of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code is an independent proceeding which is unaffected by winding up proceedings that may be filed against the same company.The bench comprising Justices RF Nariman and BR Gavai observed that a secured creditor stands outside the winding up and can realise its security de hors winding up proceedings.In this appeal, the appellant’s contention was that post admission of a winding up petition, no petition under Section 7 of the IBC can be filed. According to it, the effect of Section 446 of the Companies Act, 1956 (which is equivalent to Section 279 of the Companies Act, 2013) is that no suit or other legal proceeding can be initiated once there is admission of a winding up petition.Referring to provisions of the IBC, the bench observed IBC will prevail over the other statutes. It said:Given the object of the IBC as delineated in paragraphs 25 to 28 of Swiss Ribbons (P) Ltd. v. Union of India, (2019) 4 SCC 17 [“Swiss Ribbons”], it is clear that the IBC is a special statute dealing with revival of companies that are in the red, winding up only being resorted to in case all attempts of revival fail. Vis-à-vis the Companies Act, which is a general statute dealing with companies, including companies that are in the red, the IBC is not only a special statute which must prevail in the event of conflict, but has a non-obstante clause contained in Section 238, which makes it even clearer that in case of conflict, the provisions of the IBC will prevail.The court said that it is not possible to accede to the argument that given Section 446 of the Companies Act, 1956 / Section 279 of the Companies Act, 2013, once a winding up petition is admitted, the winding up petition should trump any subsequent attempt at revival of the company through a Section 7 or Section 9 petition filed under the IBC. It said:A conspectus of the aforesaid authorities would show that a petition either under Section 7 or Section 9 of the IBC is an independent proceeding which is unaffected by winding up proceedings that may be filed qua the same company. Given the object sought to be achieved by the IBC, it is clear that only where a company in winding up is near corporate death that no transfer of the winding up proceeding would then take place to the NCLT to be tried as a proceeding under the IBC. Short of an irresistible conclusion that corporate death is inevitable, every effort should be made to resuscitate the corporate debtor in the larger public interest, which includes not only the workmen of the corporate debtor, but also its creditors and the goods it produces in the larger interest of the economy of the country. It is, thus,Also, referring to Section 230(1) of the Companies Act, 2013, the bench said What is clear by this Section is that a compromise or arrangement can also be entered into in an IBC proceeding if liquidation is ordered. However, what is of importance is that under the Companies Act, it is only winding up that can be ordered, whereas under the IBC, the primary emphasis is on revival of the corporate debtor through infusion of a new management.Another contention raised was that the SREI has suppressed the winding up proceeding in its application under Section 7 of the IBC before the NCLT and has resorted to Section 7 only as a subterfuge to avoid moving a transfer application before the High Court in 28 the pending winding up proceeding.”These arguments do not avail the Appellant for the simple reason that Section 7 is an independent proceeding, as has been held in catena of judgments of this Court, which has to be tried on its own merits. Any “suppression” of the winding up proceeding would, therefore, not be of any effect in deciding a Section 7 petition on the basis of the provisions contained in the IBC. Equally, it cannot be said that any subterfuge has been availed of for the same reason that Section 7 is an independent proceeding that stands by itself. As has been correctly pointed out by Shri Sinha, a discretionary jurisdiction under the fifth proviso to Section 434(1)(c) of the Companies Act, 2013 cannot prevail over the undoubted jurisdiction of the NCLT under the IBC once the parameters of Section 7 and other provisions of the IBC have been met.”, the bench said while dismissing the appeal.Case:  A. Navinchandra Steels Private Limited vs. SREI Equipment Finance Limited [CIVIL APPEAL NOs.4230-4234 OF 2020]Coram: Justices RF Nariman and BR GavaiCounsel: Sr. Adv Abhishek Manu Singhvi and Sr. Adv Ranjit Kumar, Adv Abhijeet SinhaCitation: LL 2021 SC 122Click here to Read/Download JudgmentRead JudgmentNext Storylast_img read more

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Supreme Court Restores Appeal Before NGT Against Environmental Clearance Granted to Vishakapatnam Greenfield International Airport

first_imgTop StoriesSupreme Court Restores Appeal Before NGT Against Environmental Clearance Granted to Vishakapatnam Greenfield International Airport LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK2 March 2021 8:55 PMShare This – xThe Supreme Court, on Monday, set aside an order of National Green Tribunal which dismissed an appeal filed against the grant of environmental clearance for construction of the Greenfield International Airport, Bhogapuram, Vishakapatnam.The NGT, to dismiss the appeal filed by Sridevi Datla, had refused to condone the delay. The delay was sought to be condoned on the ground that the clearance…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Supreme Court, on Monday, set aside an order of National Green Tribunal which dismissed an appeal filed against the grant of environmental clearance for construction of the Greenfield International Airport, Bhogapuram, Vishakapatnam.The NGT, to dismiss the appeal filed by Sridevi Datla, had refused to condone the delay. The delay was sought to be condoned on the ground that the clearance and related documents were voluminous and the matter required some technical expertise, requiring the papers to be forwarded to experts and lawyers in Delhi, and the inter se communication delay.The issue considered by the Apex Court bench comprising Justices L. Nageswara Rao and S. Ravindra Bhat was whether the approach to the issue of limitation by the NGT was correct, and whether on a correct interpretation of law, the appeal under Section 16 was filed within the 90 days period, in the facts of this case.Provisions of the Limitation Act are inapplicable.The bench agreed with the contention of the Centre that by virtue of Section 33 of the Act, the provisions of all other laws stand overridden and consequently, the question of extending the period of limitation by reference to Section 5 of the Limitation Act would not arise.”There can be no dispute that the period of limitation set out in a special law, which provides for remedies and appeals, has to be construed in its terms and without reference to the Limitation Act, if it contains specific provisions delineating the time or period within which applications or appeals can be preferred, and confines the consideration of applications for condoning the delay to a specific number of days. Undoubtedly, in such cases, the Limitation Act would be inapplicable. There are several previous judgments of this court holding that where periods of limitation are prescribed under special laws, appeals that exceed the period granted and are within the extended period of limitation in the special law, can be entertained at the discretion of the tribunal, or court concerned and the Limitation Act would not apply upon expiry of such extended period. This court holds that there is merit in the contention of the Union that the provisions of the Limitation Act are inapplicable.”, it said.Section 10 of the General Clauses Act ApplicableThe court then proceeded to consider the contention that the appeal is to be considered as having been filed within the extended period of 60 days, since the last (of the 60 days) was a Sunday (12.07.2020). It noticed that Section 10 of the General Clauses Act, 1897 stipulates that when the last date for doing something falls on a public holiday, the act “shall be considered as done..” if it “is done or taken on the next day afterwards on which the Court or office is open”.”This provision applies to all Central Acts enacted after the said Act was brought into force…It is also noticeable that there is no indication in the NGT Act that Section 10 of the General Clauses Act cannot be applied. It is therefore, held that the provision applies proprio vigore to all appeals filed under the NGT Act.”, the court added.’Sufficient Cause’On the question of “sufficient cause” in terms of Section 16 of the NGT Act, the bench observed thus””It is evident that the term sufficient cause is relative, fact dependent, and has many hues, largely deriving colour from the facts of each case, and the behaviour of the litigant who seeks condonation of delay (in approaching the court). However, what can broadly be said to be universally accepted is that in principle, the applicant must display bona fides, should not have been negligent, and the delay occasioned should not be such that condoning it would seriously prejudice the other party.”Allowing the appeal, the bench said that the NGT erred in observing that no sufficient cause was shown by the appellant. It said:”This court is of the opinion that there is merit in the appellant’s argument. The respondents, especially, the project applicant, had urged that the appellant is an interested party, and cannot be called a public-spirited citizen, because she had opposed acquisition of land for the airport and therefore, was able to access legal advice at the High Court stage. There is, in our opinion, nothing in the NGT Act which excludes parties who would be directly affected by a project, that has environmental repercussions, from accessing the tribunal (NGT). Likewise, characterizing the nature of legal advice that can be accessed for challenging land acquisition, as similar to a challenge to environmental clearance which involves application of mind to technical issues in a detailed manner, would be unfair and simplistic. Scientific or technical support – apart from expert professional legal advice is necessary, if the NGT were to be approached. In these circumstances, this court is of the opinion that given the mandate of the NGT Act, the exercise of discretion, as was done in this case, to reject the appeal by dismissing the application for condonation of delay, on the ground that no sufficient cause was shown, was erroneous and based on a narrow reading of the law. An appeal to the NGT in such matters is no ordinary matter; it has the potential of irrevocably changing the environment with the possibility of likely injury. Application of judicial mind by an independent tribunal in such cases, at the first appellate stage, is almost a necessity.”, it said.Case: Sridevi Datla Vs. Union Of India  [CA 3136 OF 2020]Coram: Justices L. Nageswara Rao and S. Ravindra BhatCounsel: Sr. Adv Anitha Shenoy, Sr. Adv Mukul Rohatgi, ASG K.M. NatrajCitation: LL 2021 SC 127Click here to Read/Download JudgmentNext Storylast_img read more

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Aurora Borealis may be visible over Northern coasts tonight

first_img News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Google+ Facebook Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Aurora Borealis may be visible over Northern coasts tonight WhatsApp DL Debate – 24/05/21 Facebook People in Ireland may get a chance to see the Northern Lights this weekend.Known as the aurora borealis, the phenomenon is usually best viewed in the north of Norway.It’s expected that the display will be visible from at least Ireland’s Northern coasts, if not the whole country.David Moore, from Astronomy Ireland, says some recent activity on the sun could see the lights become visible as far south as Ireland later tonight:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/moorenorthernlights.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Google+center_img Twitter AudioHomepage BannerNews Pinterest WhatsApp Previous articleMay hints third vote on Brexit deal may not happenNext articleDonohue rules out general election in 2019 News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic By News Highland – March 23, 2019 Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Pinterestlast_img read more

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How do I get to become a CEO?

first_imgHow do I get to become a CEO?On 6 Nov 2001 in Personnel Today Iam 39, CIPD qualified and in the process of applying for upgrade to MIPD. I ampersonnel manager for a law firm – a role which is 90 per cent operational and10 per cent strategic. I want a greater challenge, more responsibility and thechance to grow and I find the role of CEO is increasingly appealing. What roleshould I be looking for and what qualifications will help me achieve my goal?AnnaCook, project co-ordinator, Chiumento Youhave good experience working for a professional organisation and are currentlyin a position of strength, with time to explore all the avenues available toyou. Decidewhat you enjoy and try to identify in more detail what jobs would appeal (evenif they are too senior for now). This will help you identify the most logicalroute.Youmention man management – is this managing a team or acting as a guide to linemanagers? If you want to manage a team, this will have implications for thesize of organisation you work for. If you mean coaching and developingpartners, this is an area you could develop while working for your currentemployer.Networkwith others in HR to establish what experience is required to progress and,more importantly, what opportunities exist.Movingto a CEO role in professional services could be a possibility, although you areright in thinking that you may need further study and experience.Ifyou want a more strategic overview of the general business sector, an MBA wouldbe worth considering. It is a well-recognised qualification and would open updifferent sectors to you. In any case, researching the course will help to giveyou some answers as to what you would enjoy doing and why.MargaretMalpas, joint managing director, Malpas Flexible LearningThenext challenging post for you could be a more demanding role in a largeorganisation – perhaps one with employee-relations issues. This would be goodexperience if you want to develop into a CEO role too. In general, such postsare not advertised, you need to get onto specialist agency lists or use yournetworks.Therearen’t really any specific qualifications for a CEO post, but there areattributes you need of intrinsic motivation and drive, financial and commercialacumen and possible leadership qualities. These may give you something toponder upon.JoSelby, associate director, EJ Human ResourcesAtthis stage, defining the type of role you want is very important and given you arelooking for the opportunity to grow, you may wish to consider a move to alarger organisation where you can work as part of a team and which willpotentially offer you greater scope for career development. Youmay wish to consider whether you wish to stay in the legal sector. Yourbackground lends itself to the industry, but that should not preclude you fromconsidering other environments.Thecurrent job market is not as buoyant as it has been, but there areopportunities, so while I am surprised you are finding there are noneavailable, finding the right role may take longer than you originallyanticipated. Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Theory of wave polarization of radio waves in magnetospheric cavities

first_imgWhen interpreting observations of radio waves of low frequency in magnetospheric cavities, it is often assumed that the electron concentra­tion is small enough for the ray paths to be treated as straight, but great enough to ensure that a wave that starts as a pure ordinary (or extraordinary) wave has a wave polarization close to that of an ordinary (or extraordinary) wave at each point of the path. This polarization changes because the magnitude and direction of the planetary magnetic field change along the path. But the change of the magnetic field also introduces coupling between the ordinary and extraordinary waves. If the electron concentration is small or zero, this coupling may be cumulative so that it restricts or prevents the change of polarization. A full-wave integration of the governing differential equations is used to study this problem. It is similar to the problem of limiting polarization for a radio wave emerging from the ionosphere into free space. It is concluded that the polarization of an initially ordinary (or extraordinary) wave remains close to that of a locally produced ordinary (or extra­ordinary) wave with the same wave-normal direction, provided that the plasma frequency exceeds a minimum value. This value depends on the direction of the path. Some typical examples are given.last_img read more

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