Theology professors press Sewanee to revoke Charlie Rose’s honorary degree…

first_img John Simpson says: Rector Albany, NY Rev Doris Westfall says: February 23, 2018 at 12:13 pm I thank Dorothy Vellom for taking the time to offer a measured rejoinder to my own comments. One may dispute my use of a particular term or two (e.g. “psychological difference”) but I think there can be no question that the trend in recent years has been to minimize male/female distinctions even to the absurd point these days of claiming that one’s gender should be treated as a matter of choice. (Indeed there are weirdos even in the Episcopal Church who are attempting to propagate this view!) As a traditionalist from Massachusetts I have always respected Sewanee for holding firm to a traditionalist perspective more mindful of history. Evidently things may have changed. But to illustrate the point about how in my view women these days are themselves partly responsible for the fact that people like the sophisticated Charlie Rose feel no compunction about mistreating lady acquaintances, I need point only to the exultation felt today over the U.S. women’s hockey team’s Olympic win as if adding another gold medal were all that counted. Aside from the fact that ice hockey is a very rough sport which can cause considerable body damage especially to women, is it unnatural that many reasonable males should resent the intrusion of women into yet another traditionally male sport? Charlie Rose may or may not himself have played hockey but one can understand how people with his kind of mentality may have forgotten (if they ever knew) that women deserve to be treated physically with perhaps a bit more respect than other males.Now I realize that the point I’m making might reduce me to being termed a male chauvinist pig who was born in the wrong century, but in an age when our traditional civilization is clearly under attack, I would respectfully ask for a slightly more sympathetic response than that. I still feel that the debate at Sewanee over the honorary degree awarded Charlie Rose should be broadened a bit. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Gender Justice Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS February 22, 2018 at 12:58 pm The Board dissembles in claiming, “We want to be clear that we have stood, and always will stand, against sexual harassment of women or men.” That may be the Board’s, and the University’s, official position. But the on-campus reality is that protection of sexual predators — and, worse, the placing of blame on those who have experienced sexual harassment/assault by fellow students, faculty and/or staff — has been upheld by this, and previous, administrations. Revoking Charlie Rose’s honorary degree would be only the first step in addressing this long-standing issue at Sewanee. Robert Warren Cromey says: Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By David PaulsenPosted Feb 21, 2018 Rev Doris Westfall says: February 22, 2018 at 9:51 pm “Honorary Degrees awarded by the University are in recognition of unusual achievement by individuals whose services to the Church, to arts and letters, to science or to human society have advanced the principles for which the University stands.” (Ordinances of the University of the South, Ch 19, Sect 1)If this is truly the case, then the University needs to clearly define the principles for which it stands, and then closely examine whether Mr. Rose’s services to arts and letters, and human society, crafted as they were within his toxic work environment, truly advance those principles. Dorothy Vellom, Sewanee Class of 1989 Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN February 23, 2018 at 11:03 am I do agree in part with Tony Oberdorfer, as it certainly appears that “the principles for which the University stands” in this context are directly tied to financial benefit and increased publicity. That this be made transparent was the reason I suggested the University clearly define those principles – I perhaps should have added “for which the University actually, in practice, stands.”Whether any given recipient of an honorary degree from the University of the South is worthy of the honor goes directly back to defining those principles. I am hopeful that this discussion around revocation of an honorary degree will crack open the door to honest examination of the process by which those recipients have historically been selected, and allow the University to, at the very least, bring its actions in line with its published ordinances. My greater hope is that the University administration will recenter its actions, in this and every regard, on the principles for which the greater University family – faculty, staff, students, alumni, benefactors, and community – expect it to stand, principles such as honor, truth, respect, and justice.I find myself ill-equipped to respond to the final paragraph of the comment, simply because I have not ever subscribed to the feminist movement and therefore have no basis from which to engage in that discussion. There is a vast gulf between the belief, as stated, that “there are essentially no psychological differences between the sexes worthy of consideration” (a view I have never held and, quite frankly, have never heard voiced) and the belief that every human being is worthy of being treated with dignity and respect, a view to which I do subscribe. Anticipating probable responses to my having made that statement: yes, “every human being” includes those who do not treat others with dignity or respect; no, I do not think that revoking an honor for which the person is patently unworthy runs counter to that belief; and yes, the revocation of an honor can and should be done in a respectful and dignified manner, lest the University fail, once again, to uphold the principles her greater family expects of her. Given the context in which these discussions are playing out in the University and throughout the United States, no, I do not believe that another issue, however relevant it may be, is currently more worthy of debate. In this moment, the Vice Chancellor and the Board of Regents have the opportunity to listen and to act, to demonstrate that they truly desire and are working for the best for Sewanee and the entire University family, and ultimately to open the door further for additional discussions around related, but less time-sensitive, issues.Dorothy Vellom, Sewanee Class of 1989 Tony Oberdorfer says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (22) February 21, 2018 at 11:28 pm I hope commenters have read the original letters linked from the Sewanee Purple and recommend the opinion piece from one of the students appearing in the Atlanta Journal Constitution http://www.myajc.com/blog/get-schooled/student-college-should-revoke-charlie-rose-honor-after-sexual-misconduct-charges/ux65g8UrS6mI20qvDJt1MP/. It does not bode well for the future of the Episcopal Church that it’s news service begins its coverage of this debacle with a headline about the theology professors- profound though their response was- instead of about the students, young women of faith, who are calling for change in their community. The kind of tone-deaf response that the Sewanee administration demonstrated and is echoed in some of these comments is an example of attitudes that result in the rejection of church by the coming generation. Anne Burton says: February 22, 2018 at 10:12 am Sewanee awarded Charlie Rose an honorary degree in recognition of the good he had done. That is a fact. That is history. Are we now to hide our history. I would venture that in its history, Sewanee has given degrees to bigots, rogues, thieves, and — shocking as the possibility may seem to the puritans pushing for reversal — unfaithful people. Did Sewanee make an error by not engaging an investigative company to do an extensive search for every dirty detail of every year of every honoree’s life? If we are only to honor perfect people, then we may as well print a batch with the same name: “Jesus Josephson.”Mr Rose had an outstanding career as a journalist. He also seems to have misused his relationship of power over a number of women. If that abuse had been known, one may hope he wouldn’t have been awarded that degree.History. Let anyone who wishes go through all the honorary degrees and make their list of who should and who should not have been given their degree. They were still awarded. The Rev Edwin Cox says: February 21, 2018 at 6:00 pm With Christ there is forgiveness. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rebecca Scheer says: Tony Oberdorfer says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC February 21, 2018 at 5:53 pm I can’t recall a single episode of someone being refused communion for a “notorious sin” by any cleric over the past forty or so years… and I’ve had murderers, thieves, bank robbers, and a bunch of adulterers amongst those I gave the sacraments to.Maybe an honorary degree is a different category… but on the other hand it’s a classic statement of the faith, that for membership in this body, “only sinners need apply.” Lisa Rung says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ February 23, 2018 at 9:33 am I think I agree with Dorothy Vellom though I can’t be sure she would agree with me. From his first appearance on the tube Charlie Rose was presented as commercial television’s gift to civilized discourse, an image he substantiated with his link to PBS even though he never gave up the huge income he received from commercial TV. So he had the best of both worlds so-to-speak. Colleges apparently benefit by competing with each other to award meaningless honorary degrees to the biggest “names.” I am cynical enough to believe that the decision makers at Sewanee figured the school would gain, perhaps financially, from the publicity it would receive from being associated with the name “Charlie Rose” even though by Sewanee’s own standards he really did not merit the honor any more than Oprah Winfrey was deserving of being similarly honored by Harvard. The unkindness Mr. Rose has evidently shown towards members of the opposite sex bespeaks his unworthiness as a human being and may deserve condemnation. But it is pathetic that the current discussion about Mr. Rose has focused entirely on whether or not his misbehavior should result in the revocation of his honorary degree rather than on whether or not he was worthy of the honor in the first place. One more thought: I do not question that every female by definition deserves respect and that men who abuse women physically should be severely sanctioned. But can there be any doubt that some of the problem of which Charlie Rose is just one example has been brought about by the aggressiveness of the feminist movement and its insistence that there are essentially no psychological differences between the sexes worthy of consideration? Is that issue not more worthy of debate than merely whether a long forgotten honorary degree should be rescinded? Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel SB Davenport says: Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing February 21, 2018 at 7:05 pm The women who were abused are the ones to grant forgiveness. And forgiveness does not mean that accountability goes out the window or that consequences are not imposed. No one has condemned his immortal soul. The theology taught by the “good people in the Department of Theology” is consistent with the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the historic understanding of sin and forgiveness taught by the church for 2000 years. February 21, 2018 at 6:33 pm Allegations do not make one a criminal. It appears that Salem is alive and well at Sewanee. Associate Rector Columbus, GA February 22, 2018 at 4:09 pm “Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness, for they shall be filled.” Matthew 5:6Lisa Rung Sewanee Class of 1990 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 M. Holloway says: February 21, 2018 at 5:36 pm Your demonizing or Mr. Rose only puts you in the gutter with his actions. Here’s a thought: since he is one of yours by virtue of the degree you gave him why not reach out and offer him your pastoral care and concern. That would not only be in the great Anglican tradition of pastoral care but also in the manner of the One who extended an open hand of concern and forgiveness to sinners. PJ Cabbiness says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service February 21, 2018 at 7:16 pm Yes, Rose is a sinner like the rest of us. Leave him alone. Why does Sewanee have to stoop to Media’s level of lack of compassion. Leave him alone. Take a stand on control instead. February 21, 2018 at 6:43 pm Rose asked for forgiveness. Should not it be the Church that is most likely to grant it? Sewanee was quite right in granting it and not rescinding the diploma. It makes one wonder what theology the good people in the Department of Theology is teaching? Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tony Oberdorfer says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release February 22, 2018 at 10:03 am And the Lord said, “Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.” There are no blameless, only those who have not been caught. And the are often the first to condemn. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA February 21, 2018 at 6:41 pm Holding someone accountable for their actions is neither demonizing nor condemning them. Rescinding the honorary degree does not exclude a pastoral action being taken towards Mr. Rose. As a priest I would be brought before a disciplinary board on Title IV charges if my actions mirrored those of Mr. Rose. Asking that an individual be held accountable for their actions does not smack of McCarthyism or the Inquisition as PJ Crabbiness asserts. Accountability and compassion are not mutually exclusive of one another. And I find it very telling that in not one of the comments were the multiple women who were abused, harassed, or assaulted referenced or given the same consideration as Mr. Rose. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Len Freeman says: Theology professors press Sewanee to revoke Charlie Rose’s honorary degree over scandal February 22, 2018 at 2:48 pm Forgiveness is a forever process. It is not a gift anyone can lightly dispense wholesale. Maybe this withdrawal of honor awarded for particular reasons has been too hair trigger—such a bad metaphor just now. Jackson Hill says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY February 21, 2018 at 5:38 pm Did we learn nothing from the Pharisees or McCarthyism? Rose is not a criminal. He is a flawed human being who behaved badly and is suffering the consequences. This Inquisition type zeal by Academics is troubling and short sighted. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 22, 2018 at 12:36 pm This is an unnecessary act to punish Mr. Rose. Haven’t you noticed that he has practically vanished? His name is not even mentioned anymore nor is he seen on television anywhere. The scandal virtually ruined his career and that alone would have punished him severely. Show some compassion and leave the man alone. What has happened to him is an example enough to those who may be flirting with predatory behavior at work. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME February 21, 2018 at 8:07 pm Charlie Rose has from the start been a member in good standing of the media fraternity that has caused so much damage to our country. While pretending to have a higher calling he was in reality dedicated to enriching himself as egregiously as anyone. Sewanee should never have awarded him an honorary degree in the first place and probably was motivated largely by the publicity it would engender. I might have expected better from the University of the South which surely stands guilty of bad judgment. The Rev. Lyn G. Brakeman says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Dorothy Vellom says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Scott Albergate says: February 22, 2018 at 4:30 pm Not that this comments section sounds anything but informed and reasoned, but…– Sewanee has not revoked the honorary degree– the Theology faculty letter cited above was in response to the theological points made by the Board of Regents in their letter declining to rescind the honorary degree– these are not “allegations.” Mr. Rose has acknowledged his actions– there is a sexual assault crisis in colleges around the country, and students often feel there is no recourse for victims– the request to do so was initiated by undergraduates (whatever “zeal” one perceives is led by the undergraduates, many of whom know first-hand how difficult it is to bring a perpetrator to justice in a university setting)– and if you’re keeping score at home, an honorary degree is not an instrument of reconciliation or forgiveness in this Church [Episcopal News Service] Theology professors at Sewanee: The University of the South are joining a chorus of voices calling for the Tennessee university to revoke an honorary degree given to Charlie Rose because of sexual harassment allegations against the broadcast journalist.The letter, dated Feb. 19, is addressed to top Sewanee administrators and the university’s Board of Regents and is signed by eight professors – a majority of the faculty members in the School of Theology. They seek to frame their response “within the larger, theologically grounded tradition of pastoral response to sin and forgiveness” and dispute some of the theological justifications the school has made in resisting calls to revoke Rose’s honorary degree.The letter also invokes a recent message on sexual harassment issued by the Episcopal Church’s presiding bishop and House of Deputies president.“We pray that this university will have the courage to respond to this call, and that it will seek to demonstrate in symbol and in substance that it respects the dignity of every human being, and demands similar respect be shown by all whom it honors,” the professors say in their letter, posted online by the Sewanee Purple, a student-run news publication.Sewanee’s Episcopal roots date to its founding in 1857 by clergy and lay leaders from dioceses across the south. It continues to be owned and governed by 28 Episcopal dioceses and offers a full range of degrees, in addition to training future church leaders in its seminary.Rose was a top name in TV journalism through his “Charlie Rose” interview show on PBS and Bloomberg and his co-anchor role on “CBS This Morning” when harassment allegations surfaced in November. Eight women told the Washington Post that Rose made unwanted sexual advances toward them, including lewd comments, groping and walking around naked in their presence.Rose issued an apology for his “inappropriate behavior” and admitted he had “behaved insensitively at times,” though he also disputed the accuracy of some of the allegations. He was promptly fired by PBS, Bloomberg and CBS.Charlie Rose delivers the commencement address in May 2016 at Sewanee: The University of the South. Photo: SewaneeSewanee presented Rose with an honorary degree in spring 2016, when he delivered the university’s commencement address. “Fame is way overrated unless you do something good with it,” CBS News quoted Rose as saying in his speech to graduates.Rose was one of a series of prominent men from the world of entertainment, media and politics to suddenly fall from grace last year amid allegations of sexual misconduct, prompting women everywhere to share their own stories of harassment and abuse in what has been called the #MeToo movement. Some universities have responded by taking back past honors bestowed on Rose, including Arizona State University, Fordham University and State University of New York-Oswego.The Bairnwick Women’s Center at Sewanee started an online petition in December calling for Sewanee to revoke Rose’s honorary degree, the Sewanee Purple reported, and early this month, two of the university’s student trustees, Claire Brickson and Mary Margaret Murdock, spoke to the Board of Regents recommending the board take that step.“Revoking Charlie Rose’s degree sends a clear statement to those 17 individuals who reported rapes on campus in 2016, that we support their decision to come forward,” Brickson and Murdock told the Board of Regents, according to the Sewanee Purple.Four Episcopal bishops and three Episcopal priests sit on the 20-member Board of Regents, including Florida Bishop Samuel Howard, who serves as an ex officio board member because of his position as Sewanee chancellor. The regents responded last week in a letter to Brickson and Murdock saying they decided, after “vigorous discussion,” that Rose should keep his honorary degree.“We want to be clear that we have stood, and always will stand, against sexual harassment of women or men,” the board said. “At the same time, we do not believe it is our place to condemn the individual. In fact, we think there is grave danger were we to go down that path. We impose a penalty where appropriate, but we also offer forgiveness.”The Board of Regents also asserted “condemnation has no place here” before elaborating on its “ecclesiastical considerations” in the matter.“Clarification comes in the question ‘Is there a hierarchy of sin?’ Quickly followed by ‘Are we all not sinners?’ Therein lies the ecumenical rub,” the board’s letter said. “If we condemn a person then who among us sinners should not also be condemned?”Episcopal News Service sought comment Feb. 21 from the four bishops on the Board of Regents and was referred instead to Sewanee administrators. A spokeswoman said the university had no additional statement on the issue, though one may be issued later this week.The regents’ reasoning drew a direct rebuttal from the School of Theology professors in their letter.“Respectfully, we must insist that there is a hierarchy of sin, long recognized in the tradition,” the professors say. “In the gospels, Jesus himself makes such distinctions, and he forcefully censures those who place a ‘stumbling block’ before others – that is, create scandal that impedes faith.”The professors also cite the disciplinary rubric in the Book of Common Prayer that says clergy should prevent from taking communion those who are “living a notoriously evil life” and those “who have done wrong to their neighbors and are a scandal.”“Public scandal is, in the tradition, regarded as a reason to send a message,” the professors say. “One struggles to think of a case of public scandal more obvious than the behavior of Mr. Rose.”The professors also acknowledge the revoking Rose’s honorary degree is a mere symbolic act, though no more symbolic than granting him the degree in the first place.And they point for context to the Jan. 22 letter to the Episcopal Church from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies. Curry and Jennings called on Episcopalians to take the coming of Ash Wednesday and Lent as a time to meditate “on the ways in which we in the church have failed to stand with women and other victims of abuse and harassment and to consider, as part of our Lenten disciplines, how we can redouble our work to be communities of safety that stand against the spiritual and physical violence of sexual exploitation and abuse.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Jim Newman says: Featured Events Brian MacFarland says: Rector Washington, DC Dorothy Vellom says: Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

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CFDG relaunches website

first_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 15 August 2006 | News CFDG relaunches website Tagged with: Charity Finance Group Digital Finance CFDG combines Charities Resource Network with core website to offer sector a one-stop-shopThe Charity Finance Directors’ Group’s website has been re-launched this month, taking on the group’s new branding and uniting all its online services in one place.Visitors to www.cfdg.org.uk and www.thecrn.org.uk will have a unified entry-point, with the online Resource Network services merging with CFDG’s other influencing, educating, networking and informing services. This now gives CFDG members and other professionals in the sector a one-stop-shop for all their needs.“This new site will make it much easier for us to communicate with our members and the sector, empower them to know more about the issues that concern them and promote their views to the sector and beyond. As a membership organisation sprung from the networking of its members, this is good news for all of us.” Tom Steel, Website and Information Officer“With a small core team, thanks to the input from our members, CFDG has been punching above its weight for years – it was important to have a more flexible site-structure, so we can actually represent the full variety of CFDG services and activities on the web, and give us a good basis for our future plans. Now we feel we can tell the whole story of what we are about and how many different aspects of charity management finance really impacts on.” David Membrey, Deputy Chief ExecutiveAs well as the two main services – the general website and the Charities Resource Network – being brought together, the site has been enhanced. Policy, consultations, law and regulation are given more space. CFDG members can now download past meeting reports and presentations in an events archive. For Members outside the South East, region-specific pages have been introduced. Furthermore, CFDG’s popular conferences and events have more space on the web, with information and presentation available from the previous 3 years. The site also benefits from an improved text-only version.For further information, please contact: Susanne Kendler on Tel: 020 7785 6425 or Email: [email protected] to Editor:1. The Charity Finance Directors’ Group was set up in 1987 and is an umbrella charity that specialises in helping charities to manage their finance-related functions. Visit www.cfdg.org.uk for further information.2. The new site has been designed by Ellipsis Media (www.ellipsismedia.co.uk) and converted by Ellipsis and CFDG staff.3. The Charities Resource Network (CRN) was launched in 2003, supported by a grant from the Community Fund, now the Big Lottery Fund, and is an online database of articles, signposts, case studies and example documents around charity finance, IT, HR and governance. The CRN database, which is now integrated into CFDG’s main site, currently holds about 640 documents and is continuously expanding.4. CFDG’s new brand was launched at the end of 2005. In order to guarantee cost-effectiveness and apply resources to the best use, CFDG was implementing the brand visuals into its public appearance in phases. The new website closes of the cycle of implementation phases.– ends –W www.cfdg.org.uk CFDG Promoting Best Practice in Charity FinanceCharity Finance Directors’ Group3rd Flr, Downstream Building, 1 London Bridge, London, SE1 9BGCompany Registration No. 3182826 Charity Registration No. 1054914  48 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Don’t mention legacies to Baby Boomers to secure future bequests, say DMS

first_imgDon’t mention legacies to Baby Boomers to secure future bequests, say DMS Tagged with: Consulting & Agencies legacies Research / statistics AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Today’s Baby Boomers who are writing wills are more concerned with providing for their children than including charitable bequests. However, they are keen to make such gifts in due course.These are the findings of research into the over 50s and their attitudes to legacy giving by fundraising and direct marketing agency DMS. The agency concludes that charities need to engage with Baby Boomers on a non-legacy level to secure any future will bequests.Focus-group research in April at DMS’ offices with a panel of Baby Boomer donors revealed that today’s Baby Boomers are concerned about the strains that modern living is having on younger generations, especially on their children whom are struggling with big mortgages and student debt.On the other hand, Baby Boomers are positively open to legacy giving in the future, but Wills they are making right now are prioritising their children who they foresee to be struggling. They will consider supporting charities once their immediate family is self-sufficient and financially independent.Helen Prince, Creative Planner at DMS, said: “The post boomer cohort is the first generation that is likely to be less affluent than their parents are, and parents recognise this. This however, does not mean that the Baby Boomers are not charitable to legacy causes, but it does put an unknown timeframe on when a charity will be considered for legacy giving.”So, as well as engaging the baby boomer group by sowing the seeds now, the agency recommends that charities focus much more on targeting for legacies as the Boomer generation hit their 70s, by which time direct families will have much more of their own wealth.The one group of Baby Boomers who are worth communicating with right now about legacies are those who are childless, as “these make the ideal immediate prospects for legacy giving”.www.directmarketing.co.uk  37 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 8 May 2008 | Newslast_img read more

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Voter ID laws aim to disenfranchise

first_imgDepiction of first vote of freed Black people during Reconstruction, 1870.Philadelphia – It is being called the new “poll tax” levied as a requirement for voting in parts of the United States.In 2012, ten states — Alabama, Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Mississippi, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas and Wisconsin — passed restrictive voter identification or ID laws requiring documentation that is often difficult or impossible to obtain in order for voters to secure a photo ID.A total of 19 states have passed ID laws since 2011, making voting harder for the old, the poor, married women and people of color. The Brennan Center for Justice estimates that 21 million people may be affected; that means 11 percent of eligible voters lack government-issued photo ID cards. Women who may lack proof of citizenship under their current names, the poor, the elderly and African Americans who are less likely to possess documents required by voter ID laws are particularly vulnerable.The legislation adopted by these states is based on “model” legislation written by ALEC, the American Legislative Exchange Council, a right-wing, corporate-sponsored group that helped develop Florida’s infamous “Stand Your Ground” law used by vigilante George Zimmerman to justify killing African-American teenager Trayvon Martin earlier this year.These laws impact the poor in particular who may lack the funds to secure the required documentation. Canvasses after the last Kansas election found that most people of color who were challenged lived below the poverty line. They did not own cars or have driver licenses, bank accounts or state ID cards. The canvasses found that legitimate, challenged ballots outnumbered fraudulent ballots by 300 to 1.Native Puerto Ricans living in the U.S. could also be impacted by the new laws. In December Puerto Rico passed a law invalidating previously issued Puerto Rican birth certificates as of July 1. More than a third of the 4.1 million people of Puerto Rican descent living in the U.S. must get new certificates.More than 10 million eligible voters in the affected states live more than 10 miles from ID offices. This includes an estimated 1.2 million Black and 500,000 Latino/a voters.Voter ID restrictions are not a problem for the wealthy 1%. They have the required birth certificates, driver’s licenses and passports. Keeping more workers and poor people, particularly women, the elderly and people of color, from voting can only benefit the interests of the rich. Under the 2008 Supreme Court “Citizens United” decision, wealthy corporate donors can practically predetermine the outcome of elections through massive funding of political ads.Impact in PhiladelphiaIronically, voters in Philadelphia — the “Cradle of Liberty” and home to the historic anti-slavery Abolitionist movement — will be among the hardest hit. It is estimated that more than 18 percent of Philadelphia voters will be negatively impacted.The Pennsylvania Voter ID law was passed in March under Republican Gov. Tom Corbett, referred to by many as “Governor Corporate.” He used the argument that the legislation would prevent “wide-spread” voter “fraud.” Under the new law, voters must produce a photo ID in order to vote in the November election.For those who lack a state driver license or U.S. passport, the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation will issue ID cards — providing individuals produce original birth certificates and Social Security cards.In Philadelphia, more than one in four active voters over age 80, roughly 12,000 individuals, lack the required photo IDs. More than 186,000 registered voters in Philadelphia do not drive and may lack a valid photo ID card. Many of them are people of color.For many voters, particular the elderly, these documents may be difficult, time-consuming and costly to produce — a particular hardship for those with disabilities or people who don’t live near a PennDoT center, where they must get the ID cards.An estimated 136,000 Philadelphia voters who participated in at least one election over the last four years may be barred from voting this November because their names don’t match any PennDoT-issued ID. An analysis of state driving records found 9 percent or 758,939 individual voters statewide could not be found in the PennDoT database.The American Civil Liberties Union, which has filed a legal challenge to the voter ID law, says the state’s number is too low because it excludes more than 500,000 registered voters who have expired PennDoT cards that would not be accepted by poll workers.A University of Washington study estimates that 37 percent of eligible Pennsylvania voters are unaware of the new law and another 13 percent mistakenly think they have acceptable ID.Challenges to the ID lawProponents of the Pennsylvania law claim the intent is to prevent in-person voter fraud, yet concede they can’t pinpoint a single instance of the type of “voter impersonation” fraud the law aims to prevent. Most of the fraud occurs with absentee ballots. Under the new law, voters don’t need a photo ID to obtain an absentee ballot.The real motivation behind the law was revealed by Majority Leader Mike Turzai of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives earlier this year when he told the Republican State Committee that the law would allow Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney to carry Pennsylvania in this year’s election.Two lawsuits challenging the voter ID law are pending in Pennsylvania Commonwealth Court, which will decide on July 25 whether to grant an injunction against the law requested by the ACLU.The League of Women Voters of Pennsylvania, the NAACP, the Pennsylvania State Conference and the Homeless Advocacy Project filed the petition, along with 10 voters who cannot obtain birth certificates from other states, have trouble traveling to PennDoT centers because of disabilities, or face other obstacles to voting because of the law.Along with the lawsuits, mounting public pressure has already led to nine modifications to the law by state officials since March. The most recent was a statement issued July 20 that starting Aug. 1, voters who know their Social Security number and can provide two forms of proof of address can secure a voter ID card.Protests against the ID law are planned for July 24 in Harrisburg and July 25 in Philadelphia.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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‘Dreamers’ sleep in Florida Capitol to fight for justice for Trayvon Martin

first_imgBy Imani Henry and Scott WilliamsTallahassee, Fla., July 28 — They came from all over: Florida, California, New Orleans, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., the Bronx, N.Y., and elsewhere. People of color as young as 8 years old came to support the call put out by the Dream Defenders to rally and sit-in during the weekend of July 26-28 in Florida’s State Capitol in Tallahassee. They were angry at the “not guilty” verdict for George Zimmerman and wanted justice for Trayvon Martin and new laws from the Florida legislature.Representing the national Alliance for Educational Justice, including  such grassroots groups as Youth United for Change, Sistas and Brothas United, the Northwest Bronx Community and Clergy Coalition, the Baltimore Algebra Project and the Black Youth Project, these modern-day freedom riders traveled as many as 30 hours by bus to Florida.“The brave leadership of the Dream Defenders put their bodies on the line, and our people were glad to join them and will continue to support them throughout the year,” Mustafa Sullivan, AEJ campaign organizer, told Workers World, “‘I believe that we will win’ … is not just a [protest] chant but a promise that the Dream Defenders and the Alliance for Educational Justice plan to show America when it works to end the school-to-prison pipeline, replace racist laws like Stand Your Ground, and fight for justice for all people.”In response to the “not guilty” verdict for George Zimmerman, the killer of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin, the student of color organization — Dream Defenders — has been sitting in and sleeping over in the Capitol building in Tallahassee since July 16. The group is calling on Florida Gov. Rick Scott to convene a special legislative session “to repeal the ‘stand your ground’ law, ban racial profiling and end the school-to-prison pipeline.” (dreamdefenders.org)A statewide organization with six chapters in Florida, Dream Defenders is directed by Black and Brown youth who self-identify as “the sons and daughters of slaves and farm workers” who “confront systemic inequality by building collective power.”One of the first actions of Dream Defenders, which formed in response to the murder of Trayvon Martin in 2012, was to create a human blockade and surround the Sanford Police Department, refusing to leave until George Zimmerman was arrested.‘This is not temporary’Dream Defenders’ Executive Director Philip Agnew told Workers World, “The most important thing that people should know is we are not leaving here. This is not a temporary thing. The governor and the legislature need to know that this is for the future so no one has to do this again. This is not just about the verdict. This is just the latest in a series of injustices against young people.”Over 300 people participated in a rally on July 26 attended by renowned activist and performer Harry Belafonte. Then at 5 p.m. the Capitol was closed for the weekend and 159 young people — the largest number of protesters to date — spent the night.Workers World journalists had the opportunity to interview several of these young activists who spoke about their lives and the racist, sexist, ageist oppression they face every day as they try to access jobs, go to school or simply walk around their neighborhoods as Black and Brown youth. Here are some excerpts.Melanie Andrade, 21, from Kissimmee, Fla., president of Dream Defenders at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University. Melanie has slept in the Capitol for several nights since July 16.WW: What is it like for young people in Kissimmee?I’m a first-generation American. My parents came from Cape Verde in Africa. Florida is the place like New York where many immigrants live. Lots of different people live there.My parents started working in Disney. Lots of people move to Kissimmee because of the jobs at Disney. During 10th grade I moved to Polk County, which is the “heart of Florida,” in the middle in a small city. There is a lot more tension living in a rural area for a young person of color.The rest of Florida is not like Miami or Orlando. Tallahassee is pretty segregated too. Lots of people in rural Florida live in trailers and there are lots of undocumented people. Also lots of orange groves and workers coming to work there.The police are often Black or Latino in Kissimmee. I wasn’t that scared of the police [while growing up], but as years went by, I saw it become gentrified. Now there are a million gas stations and new stores, yet always with a big influx of immigrants.You know the police and what they will do to us based on what we look like. You know if they are from Polk County — more racist — versus Oceola where Kissimmee is. I go outside and every time I get stopped in Polk County. They always patrol the community, asking for my ID. They didn’t believe me once when I said my ID was at my house [and I was] on my front lawn. I told them my ID was inside the house; white kids don’t get hassled over these things. I was safer in Kissimmee in a more diverse neighborhood.What is your economic situation?I work at McDonald’s for five years and now I make $7.40. Started at $6.35. I have never been making enough to live. I never get breaks. If I didn’t work through high school, I wouldn’t have the money to pay for my graduation stuff or to pay for taking the SAT [entry exam to get into college].What about Trayvon’s case resonates and speaks to you directly? How does the war on youth speak to you?I lived in a gated community, and my brother was arrested there. I have had the Neighborhood Watch see my brother and call the cops on him. The cops picked him up for drug paraphernalia. He’s not going to learn his lesson in jail; he will just get more mad.This incident happened just after Trayvon’s. It hit me and made me connect to criminalization. People talk about Trayvon’s character, but they don’t know anything about him. Yet people judge his character.I put things on Facebook about justice for Trayvon. People talk about how bad Trayvon was, yet they don’t understand our culture. They portray him as a “thug.” That’s the same with my brother, who is one of the smartest people I know. Connecting Trayvon’s case with my brother’s — that’s what turned me toward activism.I met the Dream Defenders at a bowling alley during a party. Phillip [the Dream Defenders’ executive director ] took the mic away from the DJ and made an announcement about a meeting they were having about Trayvon’s murder. He said, “Who is coming with me to this meeting?” I was the only one that raised my hand.When I went to the meeting, they were talking about going to the Sanford jail that my bro was in. In that county there is no juvenile detention. Rather boys are in there with men. Dream Defenders were gonna go down there and have an action at the jail where my brother was staying. I worked at McDonald’s at the time and got my shifts covered and went to the jail.What have been moments that are powerful for you this weekend sitting in the Capitol?When I meet new people and hear them expressing the same things I express. When I see people who look like me who are intellectual, who are organizing. Like when I saw the Occupy movement — people who are talking about capitalism — it didn’t hit home with us. The best part’s been talking to people like me and hearing I can do it.”Derrick StephensDerrick Stephens, 24, Youth United for Change, Philadelphia.What are conditions like for young people of color in Philadelphia?“Overall, young Black people are stereotyped that they are young and dangerous. There is the school-to-prison pipeline. Schools are set up to send you to jail. Cops are always suspicious of us. People get arrested for minor things. Cops ask me randomly if they could see my ID.It’s hard for young people to get jobs. In Philly, if you do make it through college, you can even get lower-paid jobs than the people who didn’t graduate from college. I know three college graduates working at restaurants, two as servers. These are jobs that people would get out of high school.What brought you to the Capitol this weekend?First, my morals. I joined YUC in 9th grade. Afterwards I graduated and was a mentor. The executive director asked me to sit on the board.When I got the email, I knew I had to come this weekend. I am working as a chef at a restaurant, and I called my boss and told him that there is a movement going down to Florida around Trayvon and the school-to-prison pipeline. My boss is a Black small business owner in Philly so he was very supportive.Since you’ve been here, what is a highlight for you?How many people came from around the country for the takeover yesterday and the people that stayed, slept here and continued the fight.Shamile LouisShamile Louis, 21, from Orlando, currently living in Gainesville. She came and slept over at the Capitol with only the clothes on her back on July 16.What are the conditions for young people in Orlando?People think of Disney, such a happy-go-lucky place. In West Orlando — the west side — the police harass you if you fit that suspicious look. It is really sad where I come from. Kids die every day. Lots of single-parent homes with poor and old people.My high school was the oldest high for Black people in Orlando. It’s old, dilapidated. The teachers don’t care, and it’s not up to par. Although University of Florida has been awesome, I wasn’t ready, academically prepared, for it.Why are you here at the Capitol?At University of Florida it’s mostly white, only 5,000 Black people [out of 50,000]. You see white frat guys painting “black face” on each other for their “rappers vs. rockstars” parties. That’s when I got active on social media.There was an isolated hazing incident involving a Black fraternity that made all the newspapers, and emails were sent by the administration to the entire community and alumni. Yet white frats have a minstrel show and nothing was done by the administration.That was my first chance at activism. We had lots of people come out, held town halls, and a student speak-out against racism, so that they didn’t push the mistrel show parties under the rug.When I heard that Zimmerman was “not guilty,” my world shattered. I went and balled up and cried for hours. I turned on the TV and saw [Zimmerman] smiling. My friends and I were supposed to go out, but I couldn’t. How is this OK?I just felt helpless and lost. Dream Defenders had an organizing meeting, organized a march the next Monday [July 15]. Then people decided to come to Tallahassee. I was only supposed to be here one day, but I stayed. So many times we just talked about what to do, but this time we really have a clear list and we are doing it.I have been here 11 out of the 12 days. The one night I was away from the Capitol, I slept on the floor of my house in solidarity.What has been the highlight for you during the sit-in?After the first night, no one knew what to expect sleeping in here. Thirty-five people started, 15 stayed. I got nervous that people wouldn’t care. So nervous that I bit all my nails off. By the time the building closed the next day, we had doubled to 60 people. It was so beautiful for me because I knew this is what people care about. It was a feeling that could not be explained.Last weekend when we were locked in, people from the outside were cheering for us and we were chanting together and communicating through the glass. It was one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen. They had a candlelight vigil, it was raining, and they still showed up. It was the most beautiful thing.There was a woman who had come Monday after the weekend and said that people who had been standing on the outside felt such a connection with us. She hugged me and started crying — this woman I had never spoken too. When we are here inside and outside the Capitol, we are all family. We are here for Trayvon, but this is so much bigger than Trayvon.Travis Mariani, 23, Sistas and Brothas United, Bronx, N.Y.What is it like for young people in the Bronx?It is a Catch-22. You need years of experience to get a job, but no one will give you job so you can get some experience. With the cops, I have been picked up for trespassing in my own building. Now that the Bronx Pride Community Center has closed, it is harder to find activities and events for lesbian, gay, bi, trans youth in the area.Why did you get on the bus this weekend?It more than just Trayvon Martin. It is a national issue. Racial profiling, the school-to-prison pipeline. That we are demeaned by older people who don’t expect us to be up on the issues. This is why I came.What has been a highlight for you this weekend?Being around people much younger than me here. Teenagers in high school like Trayvon. I love the chants. That we are together as young people in the Capitol, together on this issue. That we are family.Katherine EnglemanKatherine Engleman, 20, Baltimore Algebra Project. All the Baltimore participants traveled four extra hours on their own to get on the Philadephia bus.What are conditions like for young people where you come from?I lived in Baltimore for nine years; before that I lived in Evansville, Ind. Where I lived in Indiana was one of the poorest school districts, but we still had books, good food in the cafeteria, air conditioning. It was so drastically different in Baltimore. You could tell they just didn’t care about us as students. There were no books, no AC, not enough supplies.Right now we are dealing with the closing of parks and recreation centers while the city spends more money for police. If your car gets pulled over, you see three police cars surround that one car. Why do they need more money for cops if you clearly have enough police to pull over people ?Why did you come from Baltimore this weekend?I felt like I had to be here and not just talk about things but take action.The action yesterday, all the marching, singing “We who believe in freedom cannot rest” with all those people made me cry. It is powerful when we chant, “I believe that we will win!”Jaylen StewartJaylen Stewart, 8, Tallahassee. He starts 3rd grade on Aug. 19. He has been in the Capitol for six days.Why are you here, Jaylen?Because I want justice.What do you think was bad or unjust?That Trayvon Martin got killed. Because he was on his way home and he didn’t do nothing.What has been your favorite thing about being here?I get to learn more stuff. Games. Songs.What is your favorite song ?“Mama mama can’t see. What the state is done to me. They keep trying to bring us down. So we’re marching into town.”What do you think is important for people to know about why you are sleeping here?They need to change the law because it wasn’t right what Zimmerman did to Trayvon.Mustafa Sullivan, AEJ campaign organizer, told Workers World, “This past weekend joining the Dream Defenders was an honor, a lesson and a life-changing experience. Many of the youth leaders, adult organizers and community members of the Bronx, D.C., Philadelphia, Baltimore and Florida pledge to continue the fight for Trayvon’s law until the fight is won.” To support the Dream Defenders’ struggle for Trayvon’s Law, see DreamDefenders.org.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Azerbaïdjan : bloggers arrest an example of crude retaliation

first_imgNews December 20, 2010 – Updated on January 25, 2016 Azerbaïdjan : bloggers arrest an example of crude retaliation RSF_en Cable 09BAKU749In a cable referring to President Aliev family as the Corleones (in The Godfather movie), the President’s foreign policy is seen as “a helpful bias toward integrationwith the West”, yet “at home his policies have becomeincreasingly authoritarian and hostile to diversity ofpolitical views.” The President takes challenge as an affront, “to the detriment of the country’s democratic development”. “The example of the cruderetaliation against the young bloggers Emin Milli and AdnanHajizade is the most recent and public example”. Both were sentenced to prison terms but released after a few months in jail. (read the article)Read the cable:http://www.wikileaks.ch/cable/2009/09/09BAKU749.html center_img Organisation Help by sharing this informationlast_img read more

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Uzbek journalist freed after 19 years in prison

first_img Follow the news on Uzbekistan May 11, 2021 Find out more UzbekistanEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentViolenceImprisoned More than six years in prison for Uzbek blogger who covered corruption Help by sharing this information News Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is relieved to learn that Yusuf Ruzimuradov, an Uzbek journalist who had been held for 19 years, was finally released on 22 February. RSF calls on the Uzbek authorities to free the nine other journalists still held in Uzbekistan.Now aged 64, Ruzimuradov was one of the world’s longest held journalists. A reporter for Erk, then Uzbekistan’s leading opposition newspaper, he was arrested in 1999, tortured and convicted on a charge of conspiracy against the state, receiving a 15-year jail sentence that was extended at least twice.“We are greatly relieved by Yusuf Ruzimuradov’s release, even if he should never have been imprisoned, and we urge the authorities to immediately free the nine other journalists and media workers who are wrongfully imprisoned in Uzbekistan,” RSF said. Ruzimuradov is the latest in a series of journalists and human rights defenders to have been freed since President Islam Karimov’s death in August 2016. The journalists include former Erk editor Muhammad Bekjanov, freed in February 2017 after being held for 18 years, Jamshid Karimov, released a month later after nearly 10 years in a psychiatric clinic, and Solidzhon Abdurakhmanov, freed in October 2017 after nine years in prison.The journalists Bobomurod Abdullayev, Barno Khudoyorova and Gayrat Mikhliboyev and the blogger Hayot Nasriddinov continue to be jailed in connection with their reporting. Five other journalists who worked for the newspaper Irmok are also still held although their release was announced several months ago. Uzbekistan is ranked 169th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index. New press freedom predators elected to UN Human Rights Council News Receive email alerts October 15, 2020 Find out more Uzbek blogger facing possible 10-year jail term News February 11, 2021 Find out more RSF_en Organisation March 6, 2018 – Updated on May 16, 2018 Uzbek journalist freed after 19 years in prison to go further News Credit: Radio Ozodlik (RFE/RL) UzbekistanEurope – Central Asia Condemning abusesProtecting journalists Judicial harassmentViolenceImprisoned last_img read more

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Questionable video allegations about murders of two journalists

first_img October 26, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Questionable video allegations about murders of two journalists to go further González is seen handcuffed and surrounded by five heavily armed masked men in the video. Responding to questions, he says that the articles of Armando Rodríguez Carreón of El Diario and Enrique Perea Quintanilla, the founder and editor of the monthly Dos Caras, Una Verdad linked his sister to the Juárez drug-trafficking cartel and that she therefore ordered their execution.Rodríguez was gunned down outside his home in Ciudad Juárez on 13 November 2008. Perea was murdered on 9 August 2006. In a dubious video sent to TV Azteca three days later, three men are seen confessing to killing Perea on the Juárez cartel’s orders.Reporters Without Borders treats all allegations of this kind with the required caution.The carefully-staged interrogation of González raises many questions about the veracity of what is alleged. Who made the recording and with what aim? Who are the armed men surrounding González and why are they on screen? Was González talking spontaneously or was he reciting what he had previously been told to say? The investigations into the unsolved murders of these two journalists should be relaunched on the basis of these questions.Mexico is ranked 136th out of 178 countries in the press freedom index that Reporters Without Borders released this month. A total of 11 journalists have been murdered in Mexico since the start of the year. It has been established (or is considered probable) in seven of these cases that the murder was linked to the victim’s journalistic work. Help by sharing this information NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say May 5, 2021 Find out more April 28, 2021 Find out more MexicoAmericas RSF_en Receive email alerts News May 13, 2021 Find out more News 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Reports MexicoAmericas Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state Organisation News In a video posted yesterday on the website of the daily newspaper El Diario (and subsequently posted on YouTube), the kidnapped brother of former Chihuahua state attorney general Patricia González, lawyer Mario Ángel González, has accused her of ordering the murder of two journalists.Watch the video (in Spanish, without subtitles) Follow the news on Mexicolast_img read more

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Donegal suffer heavy defeat at the hands of Mayo

first_img Pinterest Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH News Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Twitter Google+ Help sought in search for missing 27 year old in Letterkenny WhatsApp 448 new cases of Covid 19 reported today WhatsApp Pinterest Reigning all Ireland champions Donegal suffered a heavy defeat this afternoon after a  4-17 to 1-10 defeat at the hands of Mayo in Croke Park.Despite conceding very few goals throughout this campaign, Donegal were unable to hold Mayo out for long with two early goals from Cillian O’Connor and Donal Vaughan helping the Connacht champions on their way.A half-time scoreline of 2-10 to 0-04 confirmed their dominence all over the park.The second half didn’t prove any better for Donegal as Mayo quickly added two more goals to further extend their lead.Donegals fortunes were further compounded when Eamonn McGee was shown red midway through the second half.Despite a late Colm McFadden consolation goal, a final scorline of 4-17 to 1-10 left Donegal with their heaviest defeat under manager Jim McGuiness.center_img Donegal suffer heavy defeat at the hands of Mayo Twitter Previous articleConcern over threats and intimidation from travellers at Ballybofey car park – Cllr McGowanNext articleFunerals of two men killed in road collision near Rathmullan takes place News Highland RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Facebook NPHET ‘positive’ on easing restrictions – Donnelly Three factors driving Donegal housing market – Robinson Facebook By News Highland – August 4, 2013 last_img read more

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Letterkenny Town Council may take legal action to prevent council being scrapped

first_img Calls for maternity restrictions to be lifted at LUH Business Matters Ep 45 – Boyd Robinson, Annette Houston & Michael Margey Facebook Previous articleCouncillor Peter McLaughlin elected as ‘Funcrana’ MayorNext articleBuncrana Councillor outlines some positives from recent Minister Phil Hogan meeting News Highland Cllr Ciaran BroganLetterkenny Town Councillors have committed to strongly oppose the scrapping of town councils.This week Councillors agreed to leave no stone unturned in trying to save the council and have not ruled out going down the legal route.Raising the issue Councillor Ciaran Brogan also expressed his disappointment that council staff and members have been told nothing of what will happen if the council is scrapped:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/ciacounSCRAP.mp3[/podcast] Google+ Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Facebook Twitter Letterkenny Town Council may take legal action to prevent council being scrappedcenter_img WhatsApp News Almost 10,000 appointments cancelled in Saolta Hospital Group this week WhatsApp By News Highland – June 13, 2013 Guidelines for reopening of hospitality sector published Need for issues with Mica redress scheme to be addressed raised in Seanad also Google+ Pinterest LUH system challenged by however, work to reduce risk to patients ongoing – Dr Hamilton last_img read more

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