International media does not escape violence unleashed by Mubarak supporters

first_img Reporters Without Borders unreservedly condemns today’s shocking attacks on BBC, Al Jazeera, CNN, Al-Arabiya and ABC News journalists by Mubarak supporters who were reportedly accompanied by plainclothes police. The attacks took place during clashes in central Cairo’s Tahrir Square between supporters of the president and demonstrators calling for his resignation.“The use of violence against media personnel is especially shocking,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Jean-François Julliard said. “Several were directly targeted by the president’s supporters and infiltrated policemen. Several were beaten and their equipment was stolen.“We remind all parties that journalists are external observers who under no circumstances should be identified with one side or the other. These attacks seem to have been acts of revenge against the international media for relaying the protests calling for President Mubarak’s resigning. They are also designed to silence journalists and gag news media.“We urge the international community to react strongly to these excesses,” Julliard added. “And we remind the Egyptian government that it has a duty to apply the law and to urgently restore security for everyone, including media personnel.”Because of the confusion surrounding today’s protests, it is still hard to obtain precise details about the violence against the media. Initial reports indicate that Anderson Cooper of CNN, Jerome Boehm of the BBC and Lara Setrakian of Bloomberg were among those who were attacked by Mubarak supporters.Several of the journalists who described today’s incidents asked not to be identified for fear of reprisals. “As soon as they see a camera, they hurl themselves at it,” said a journalist who had stones thrown at him during the protests. Another said he was kicked and his camera was ripped from his hands. to go further Detained woman journalist pressured by interrogator, harassed by prison staff Follow the news on Egypt Less press freedom than ever in Egypt, 10 years after revolution News EgyptMiddle East – North Africa RSF_en News Help by sharing this information February 1, 2021 Find out morecenter_img News EgyptMiddle East – North Africa January 22, 2021 Find out more February 2, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 International media does not escape violence unleashed by Mubarak supporters Al Jazeera journalist Mahmoud Hussein back home after four years in prison Organisation Receive email alerts News February 6, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Trojans sweep Matadors in straight sets

first_imgThe No. 1 Trojans were quick and decisive in proving their top ranking, winning 25-18, 25-17, and 25-20 in straight sets Wednesday against No. 12 Cal State Northridge (1-3, 0-1).In the process, the Trojans also earned some much-needed redemption, as the Matadors ended the Trojans’ 2010 season with a four-set win in the MPSF Tournament’s first round last spring. The recent win, however, was also the first time USC has beaten Northridge in 17 matches.Earlier in the week, USC coach Bill Ferguson continually stressed focus on the Trojan side of the net, especially in regards to honing their passing and defense.Paired with their potent offense, this turned out to be the recipe for success.USC dramatically outpaced the Matadors in hitting percentage (.455 to .227), blocks (5.5 to 1.0) and digs (29 to 20).Northridge also finished with 18 service errors, compared to just eight for USC.Freshman outside hitter Brandon Lebrock led the Matadors with 10 kills and senior libero Kaleo Baxter led the team with eight digs.The Trojans executed Ferguson’s plan to near perfection. Northridge’s vaunted serving attack was annulled by strong passing by the Trojans, who finished with only two serve receive errors.Behind sharp passing, senior setter Riley McKibbin exposed the aptly-named Matador defense, dishing out 27 assists that led to a .540 kill percentage.“The middle attack in volleyball is just like running the ball up the middle in football,” Ferguson said. “If you can establish it successfully, the other parts of the game become much more open.With most passes coming right to McKibbin, the quick middle attack became available on nearly every play.The Trojans showcased their quick and sharp middle attack, led by seven kills from senior middle blocker Austin Zahn, followed by three kills from junior middle blocker Steven Shandrick.Both Shandrick and Zahn hit above an astronomical .500 clip.“We always start by attacking their middle blocker. We have two great middle blockers – two of the best in the league,” McKibbin said. “I can set them anywhere and expect them to put it away.”This strategy worked well for the Trojans. Once the middle attack was established, McKibbin’s outside sets were often met by only one blocker at a time.This led to opportunities for junior outside hitter Tony Ciarelli, who led the charge with 11 kills.Senior opposite hitter Murphy Troy had a monstrous match, finishing with 10 kills at a .667 kill percentage, displaying a bevy of tips and tools over and around the Matador block in conjunction with his intimidating power attack.“All the credit goes to the passers. We had great passing, which led to great sets to me and the rest of the hitters,” Troy said. “Riley could get one-on-ones all the time. At that point, putting the ball away is easy.”Ferguson reinforced his co-captains’ benefits from a strong passing game.“The key [to a strong middle attack] is that we’re passing the ball great,” Ferguson said. “[Freshman libero] Henry Cassiday is playing great volleyball, and Ciarelli and [sophomore outside hitter] Maddison McKibbin are passing great too.”Cassiday finished with 13 digs in his first career conference match.“Our technique looked good. If we prepare in the gym and come with the right tools, we can handle anything thrown our way,” Ferguson said.last_img read more

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Will fans show up to support basketball?

first_imgAngel Viscarra | Daily TrojanIn the blink of an eye, college basketball season has once again returned. And while fans of the college game and commentators across the nation have bought into the hype for this year’s USC men’s basketball team, there’s still no surety in saying the Trojan student body has done the same.USC will open the 2017-18 regular season as the No. 10 team in the nation. This is the program’s highest preseason ranking in more than four decades, and also the highest ranking for the team since 1992, when USC finished the season ranked eighth nationally.The hype for this season’s squad is palpable. Coming off of a program-record 26 wins last season — which saw the Trojans win two NCAA Tournament games for the first time since 2007 — many feel this USC team has the potential to compete with the nation’s elite. It finished just one win away from a Sweet 16 berth in last year’s tournament, dropping an 82-78 heartbreaker to Baylor.The depth the Trojans will bring back from last year’s team is what has followers of the program most optimistic. USC’s top eight scorers from last season are returning, including the Trojans’ veteran nucleus of senior guards Jordan McLaughlin and Elijah Stewart and junior forwards Bennie Boatwright and Chimezie Metu. While today’s standard in college basketball is to leave a program after one year as a top NBA prospect, this Trojan basketball team is about as veteran-heavy as there is in the nation. In addition to its upperclassman leaders, USC has promising youth that look ready to contribute immediately in the coming season. Sophomore guard De’Anthony Melton put together a promising freshman campaign that saw him earn an All-Pac-12 Defensive Team Honorable Mention. The Trojans also look to receive key contributions from redshirt sophomore guard Derryck Thornton, who transferred from Duke last year, and true freshman wing Jordan Usher. But while USC has caught the eye of many on paper, the Trojans still have other contributing factors on their own campus that may slow down the hype train.The USC football team is currently ranked at No. 15. At 8-2 overall this season, the Trojans are primed to make a run for a Pac-12 Championship, which the program has not won since 2009. USC is one of only four schools nationally to currently have both its men’s basketball and football teams ranked in the top 25 (Miami, Michigan State and Notre Dame are the others). As the football team wraps up its regular season, likely plays in the Pac-12 Championship and qualifies for a bowl game in the coming weeks, the men’s basketball team will be playing its non-conference schedule. USC basketball will inevitably be the white noise playing softly in the background as the football team wraps up its 2017 campaign. USC’s non-conference schedule will begin this Friday night with a home contest against Cal State Fullerton and will run through Dec. 25. The Trojans open conference play against Washington at the Galen Center on Dec. 29. By then, USC football will be nearing the end of postseason play. When classes resume for the spring semester on Jan. 8, rest assured that the campus spotlight will finally be adjusted on this basketball team. If the Trojans can replicate the non-conference effort they gave last season (they reeled off 13 straight wins to open the campaign), then the hype train will pick up speed. It will be interesting to see if the Trojans’ early excitement this season will translate to higher turnouts at the Galen Center. USC’s home arena has a maximum capacity of 10,258, but the Trojans averaged 4,625 fans per home game last year. If the Trojans are still ranked within the top 15 when the spring semester commences, I’d expect this number to grow. When it comes to preseason rankings and projections, players and coaches alike are pretty hushed and private in their discussions. However, it’s no secret that the Trojans’ battle for relevance will begin on their own campus.Angel Viscarra is a junior studying broadcast and digital journalism. His column, “Viscarra’s Vice,” runs Tuesdays.last_img read more

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GUNS LOADED FIRES ON EIGHT DAYS REST TO WIN $75,000 JOE HERNANDEZ STAKES BY 2 ¼ LENGTHS UNDER GONZALEZ; O’NEILL TRAINEE GETS 6 ½ FURLONGS DOWN HILLSIDE TURF IN 1:12.60

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (Feb. 28, 2016)–An allowance winner on dirt just eight days ago, the Doug O’Neill-conditioned Guns Loaded transitioned back to the turf in fine fashion on Sunday, as he took Santa Anita’s featured $75,000 Joe Hernandez Stakes by 2 ¼ lengths. Ridden by Santiago Gonzalez, Guns Loaded negotiated 6 ½ furlongs down the Camino Real Turf Course in 1:12.60.“All the credit goes to Doug,” said part-owner and O’Neill assistant, Steve Rothblum. “If you’re a numbers player, on the Ragozin Sheets, if you run them back off a good race, within nine days, they run great. If you wait longer, they don’t. It’s either run them back quick or run them back after 30 days.  “We lost this horse for 32 (thousand, dollars) at Del Mar (Nov. 5) and when we took him back in December (6, at Los Alamitos), Pete Miller did us a favor, ’cause he castrated him and it really helped him. He’s a neat little horse that tries his guts out. He can run on dirt or on grass, it’s so cool to watch him progress like that.”Second, about a length and half behind favored Rocket Heat crossing the dirt at the top of the stretch, Guns Loaded rallied powerfully to overhaul “Rocket” a furlong out and won as much best. Off at 6-1 in a field of seven, Guns Loaded paid $14.80, $6.00 and $3.20.“When we put him on the grass (three starts back, on Dec. 27) he ran huge,” said O’Neill. “But, he ran big last time when they took the race off the grass as well. He’ll definitely get a breather now. He’s done a lot here in eight days, so he’s deserving of a month off or so. What an honest, nice horse.”Owned by Westside Rentals.com, Neil Haymes, Leo Rodriguez and Steve Rothblum, Guns Loaded, a 5-year-old Florida-bred gelding by D’wildcat, he’s now two for five down the hillside turf and is 25-7-3-4 overall. With the winner’s share of $47,100, he increased his earnings to $346,570.Off at 9-5, the aptly named Rocket Heat showed the way early under Rafael Bejarano and proved game for second money, prevailing by a head over Irish-bred Hunt. Rocket Heat paid $3.80 and $2.60.Ridden by Flavien Prat, Hunt was the second choice in the wagering at 5-2 and paid $2.80 to show.Fractions on the race were 21.32, 43.14 and 1:06.31.last_img read more

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D’AMATO’S SHEER PLEASURE LOOMS HORSE TO BEAT IN COMPETITIVE $125,000 FRAN’S VALENTINE STAKES AT MILE ON TURF SATURDAY

first_imgARCADIA, Calif. (May 25, 2016)–Fresh off a second place finish to three-time Eclipse Champion Beholder, trainer Phil D’Amato’s Sheer Pleasure heads a competitive field of eight California-bred or sired older fillies and mares in Saturday’s $125,000 Fran’s Valentine Stakes at one mile on turf.Named for the late Earl Scheib’s homebred multiple graded stakes winning millionaire filly, the Fran’s Valentine was originally run at Hollywood Park in 1995 and will be run for the third consecutive year at Santa Anita on Saturday. VELVET MESQUITE: Although all six of her lifetime wins have come over Santa Anita’s 6 ½ furlong hillside turf course, this classy 6-year-old mare by In Excess was a game day scratch out of Saturday’s downhill Mizdirection Stakes, enabling her to face state-breds in her first-ever attempt around two turns on grass. Trained by Blake Heap, she’s owned by her breeder, Harris Farms, Inc., and is out of the Huddle Up mare, Mesquite. With Tyler Baze taking the riding assignment, it’s expected Velvet Mesquite will show plenty of speed on the stretch out. With an overall mark of 21-6-5-2, she has earnings of $459,446.                SINGING KITTY: Fourth, beaten just three quarters of a length by Sheer Pleasure in the one mile (main track) Dream of Summer Stakes here on March 27, trainer Matt Chew’s Singing Kitty has two wins, a second and at third from five tries at one mile on turf and rates a big chance on Saturday with a stalking trip. A three-time stakes winner since being claimed for $32,000 in December, 2014, Singing Kitty has two one mile turf stakes wins to her credit. Owned by Aulds or Jeong, Singing Kitty, a 4-year-old daughter of Ministers Wild Cat, is 16-5-1-1 overall with earnings of $339,488.                 SHEER PLEASURE: Second, beaten 2 ½ lengths by three-time Eclipse Award Champion Beholder in the Grade III, 1 1/16 miles Adoration Stakes here May 8, this 4-year-old Birdonthewire filly takes what by any accounting, is a massive drop in class as she faces state-breds and transitions to turf. Owned by Little Red Feather Racing and R/M Racing, Sheer Pleasure pressed the early pace in the Adoration and made the lead midway, but was no match for Beholder in the final quarter mile. A two-time stakes winner versus state-breds last year, Sheer Pleasure has tried turf just once–as she ran a close fourth in the one mile California Oaks here in January, 2015. She is 12-4-3-0 overall with earnings of $403,030 and will be ridden for the third consecutive time by Martin Garcia. BERT’S MELODY: Trained by Sean McCarthy, this consistent 5-year-old mare by Bertrando was a solid first condition allowance winner going a mile on turf here Feb. 27, and she came back to run a big second in a second condition allowance at 1 1/8 miles on turf May 5. A perfect two for two going a mile on turf at Santa Anita, Bert’s Melody, who is owned by her breeder, Oakcrest Stable, should appreciate the cutback in distance. With three wins from 11 overall starts, she has earnings of $156,893. FRAN’S VALENTINE ONE OF FIVE CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH STAKES FOR HORSES BRED OR SIRED IN CALIFORNIA THE $125,000 FRAN’S VALENTINE STAKES IN POST POSITION ORDER WITH JOCKEYS & WEIGHTSRace 10 (of 11)                           Approximate post time 6:30 p.m. PDT                 NITE DELITE: Trained by Art Sherman, this speedy 4-year-old daughter of War Chant opened up early and finished a tiring second in a one mile allowance at Los Alamitos on April 24, which was her first attempt at a route of ground. Owned by F. Jack Liebau, Nite Delite has three wins from 12 starts, with two of her victories coming on turf. With Stewart Elliott engaged to ride her back, it’s expected she’ll show the way early. Smoove It–Mario Gutierrez–120Nite Delite–Steward Elliott–120Sheer Pleasure–Martin Garcia–122Madame Mousse–Santiago Gonzalez–120Lily Kai–Drayden Van Dyke–120Bert’s Melody–Brice Blanc–120Velvet Mesquite–Tyler Baze–120Singing Kitty–Rafael Bejarano–120First post time on Saturday is at 2 p.m. Admission gates will open at 11:30 a.m. For scratches, late changes and complete morning line information, please visit santaanita.com.last_img read more

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Letterkenny group plants the seeds to end the scourge of polio

first_imgPolio is a crippling and potentially fatal infectious disease usually affecting children under 5 years of age for which there is no cure, but there are safe and effective vaccines. It can be spread person to person, typically through contaminated water. Though the disease is eradicated from most of the countries, it still affects some of the most marginalized sections and poorest people in Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria.In spite of the success, if we fail to completely eradicate this highly infectious disease, there is a good possibility of it reappearing in the coming decades. Therefore the main purpose of World Polio Day in October is to celebrate this great achievement but continue to spread the word, not the disease. However, until we end Polio forever with vaccinations, every child remains at risk.The Rotary Club in Letterkenny are delighted to be involved in supporting the Polio Campaign and were busy last October planting Purple Crocus corms in Ballymalcool Park adjacent to where the 2017 bulbs were planted near Ballymacool House.The purple colour is symbolic with the colour of the Polio vaccine used by volunteers, and the Purple Crocus is used by Rotarians worldwide raising awareness on the Rotary fight against Polio.This work was completed in association with Town Gardener David Donnelly and his staff and thanks to them for their dedication. The signage is now complete thanks to Joe Bonnar Metalcrafts Ltd for their support in this regard, which was unveiled today 9th April, with Mark Patton, Bonar Metalcrafts in attendance, David Donnelly (Town Gardener) & some of his dedicated crew, as well as Rotary Club President Sharon Black & fellow Rotarians.It is intended to enlarge the Crocus area on an annual basis, which will remain a symbolic reminder to us all of the ‘End Polio’ campaign for many years to come.Letterkenny group plants the seeds to end the scourge of polio was last modified: April 9th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:letterkennypolioRotary Clublast_img read more

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The RESNET Standard Becomes the New Ventilation Battleground

first_imgJust because I haven’t written about the jockeying over ventilation rates and strategies with the ASHRAE 62.2 committee doesn’t mean nothing’s going on. If you’ve been following the battle over this issue, you know that Joe Lstiburek, PhD, PE, got fed up with ASHRAE and introduced his own ventilation “standard” in 2013. Then the “Great Ventilation Debate” happened in Detroit, and he got back on the ASHRAE 62.2 committee.Stuff happened and now RESNET just put an interesting amendment out for public comment. Follow that?A brief history of the recent battleLet’s go over the recent history quickly because we want to get to the current state of affairs, right? (Plus I’m on an airplane that will be landing in an hour and then I’ve got to go watch the fireworks with my stepson. No, really. It’s the 4th of July.) So here’s my quick chronology.The 2010 version of the residential ventilation standard, ASHRAE 62.2, gets adopted for programs and codes. The simplified version of the rate is 1 cfm per 100 square feet of conditioned floor area (CFA) plus 7.5 cfm per person. (The number of people isn’t the actual number of people; it’s the number of bedrooms plus one.) Everyone’s happy, mostly.The 2013 version of ASHRAE 62.2 changes the first part of the calculation. It goes from 1 cfm per 100 square feet of CFA to 3 cfm per 100 square feet. The result is that the total rate nearly doubles. The natives become restless. Dr. Joe introduces BSC-01, his ventilation “standard.” (I put that in quotes because it’s not really a standard in the same sense that 62.2 is. There’s no consensus process or public comment behind it. Now that you know that, I’m going to drop the quotes, but you can do air quotes when you read it if you like.) It basically goes back to the 2010 rates of 62.2 but also includes credits to adjust the rate based on the ventilation strategy. The revolution has begun.At the 2014 Affordable Comfort conference in Detroit, the Great Ventilation Debate resulted in Dr. Joe becoming a member of the 62.2 committee again. Everyone sings Kumbaya. Got it? That’s where things were last time I wrote about this issue.The 62.2 committee discusses ratesIn 2014 I started going to the ASHRAE 62.2 committee meetings. The June meeting that year was in Seattle. Joe Lstiburek and Max Sherman spoke to each other, as you can see in the photo below (Image #2), but not much happened at that meeting.No, the first big move came at the 2015 meeting in Atlanta. There the committee voted on proposals to lower the ventilation rate and give a credit to balanced ventilation. The vote at the meeting was in favor of those proposals, but when absent committee members voted later, the proposals failed.At the 2016 meeting in St. Louis last month, the committee voted again on lowering the rate. They wanted to take the square footage part of the equation from 3 cfm per 100 square feet of CFA to 2.2 cfm per 100 square feet.Those in favor of higher rates made various arguments to support their reasoning, but none had any hard evidence behind them. Max Sherman made what I thought was the worst argument: He quoted the first ASHRAE president as saying, “Ventilation is next to godliness.” What he didn’t say was that in the 19th century, medical doctors often advised people to keep their homes closed up because they thought fresh air made people sick, so the big battle then was just to get any ventilation at all.When the committee voted, the result was 10 in favor of lowering the rate and 8 opposed. The motion failed because it needed a 2/3 majority to pass.Following that discussion, the committee considered a proposal to give a credit to ventilation systems that distributed the air throughout a home. The vote was similar. A majority voted for the credit, but not a 2/3 majority. It failed, too.Meanwhile, at the code hearings…While Lstiburek was trying to get his ideas adopted into the ASHRAE 62.2 standard, he was simultaneously working to get them adopted into the building code. The code hearings have to keep up with their three-year cycle of publishing updated codes. Since the 2015 codes came out, they’ve taken up the issue of ventilation rates.Through the 2015 IRC, the ventilation rate was set at the ASHRAE 62-1989 rate:0.35 air changes per hour but not less than 15 cfm/personLast year at the code hearings, that rate was updated to:(0.01 cfm/square foot of conditioned floor area) + (7.5 cfm/person)That’s basically the rate from the 2010 version of ASHRAE 62.2 and Lstiburek’s BSC-01. There’s no acknowledgment of the differences between ventilation strategies, though. It’s the same rate whether you do exhaust-only, supply-only, or balanced.This change has happened already. It has passed. It will be in the 2018 IRC/IECC.But there’s another part of the code that needs to be changed to realize the rate change fully. Three years ago, I wrote about something new that appeared in the last code cycle (the codes get updated every three years): The IECC adopted another compliance pathway. It’s a performance, as opposed to prescriptive, path and meeting the code is based on hitting a certain number on what they call the Energy Rating Index (ERI). That index is basically the same thing as the HERS Index and it’s in the 2015 IECC.But now the building code needs another change if they want the ERI to be calculated using the code-mandated ventilation rate rather than what RESNET says. The code has to make a change even if RESNET adopts the amendment described below because the code language for the ERI points to RESNET’s current standard. So, they’re working to fix that. The language to do so is:The ERI reference design ventilation rate shall be as specified by Equation 15-1 of Section M1507.3.3 of the International Residential Code.If it passes, that would mean the ERI will always be calculated based on the ventilation rate specified in the building code, not what RESNET or any other ERI organization specifies.RESNET’s sticky situationAnd now you know how the code change is connected to RESNET through the Energy Rating Index. That ties RESNET to the building codes pretty strongly. Actually, RESNET was bound to the code before the ERI because the HERS reference home is based on the 2004/2006 IECC.Recently, RESNET sent out a notice of a proposed amendment to the home energy rating standard. The changes mostly have to do with how the ventilation rate is calculated for the reference home, but there are a few other updates in there, too. If you download the proposed amendment, you’ll see that references to the 62.2-2013 rate are struck through and replaced with 0.01 x CFA + 7.5 x (Nbr+1) cfm.I asked Joe Lstiburek about the amendment, and he sent this response in an email:RESNET is currently in conflict with the IRC on ventilation. RESNET by referencing ASHRAE is setting a higher ventilation rate than the code. RESNET is in the ratings business, not in the business of setting ventilation rates. If other programs such as Energy Star or LEED want to set a ventilation rate in order to participate in their program, that is up to Energy Star or LEED. And RESNET should rate those houses accordingly. But in terms of rating standard newly constructed houses, RESNET should follow the code.If RESNET does not adopt this amendment then there is a high likelihood that the proposed IECC code change allowing RESNET to provide an alternative path for code compliance will lose at the Final Action Hearings in Kansas City in October unless the proposed code change is modified to bring it into compliance with the IRC. Building officials do not like third-party groups setting important code changes such as ventilation rates that the building officials do not get to approve as part of their code process.Additionally, the current language penalizes balanced ventilation in favor of exhaust ventilation. This is a bad precedent. Better ventilation systems are penalized in favor of poor ventilation systems. RESNET raters are aware of this as are builders and both are gaming the ratings system. Balanced system get rating point hits as compared to exhaust-only systems.He’s right, and there’s an important point in here that often trips people up. I got confused about it myself when I was new to the home energy rating field. A HERS rating is just an analysis. There are no thresholds you have to meet to “pass” anything. It’s supposed to be an objective look at the energy use of a house compared to a “reference home.”That’s what Lstiburek is saying in the first paragraph above. The reference home, by definition, is supposed to be based on the code. Now that the code and ASHRAE 62.2 have parted ways, RESNET has to make a choice: Do they want to stick with the building code, as they should? Or will they follow a ventilation standard that’s not being used much? I’m in favor of sticking with the code.If you’d like to learn more about the RESNET amendment or to make a comment, go to the RESNET page for this amendment. Once there, you can read the comments that have already been posted.SummaryThe building code has changed the ventilation rate required in new homes. They’re working on getting the calculation for the ERI based on the new code-required ventilation rate. If RESNET wants the HERS Index to qualify as an ERI, they need to make a change, too. Here are the three scenarios:If the code language above gets adopted and RESNET passes its amendment, the ERI will be based on the new IRC ventilation rate and the HERS Index will be the same as the ERI.If the code amendment passes but RESNET’s doesn’t, RESNET will have to make changes to calculate the ERI separately from the HERS Index. They might need to have separate calculations anyway for programs and jurisdictions that use different ventilation rates.If the code language above does not pass, the ERI path probably won’t be as appealing to builders because they’ll take a hit in ERI points for meeting code instead of ASHRAE 62.2-2013.Isn’t it fun to get into the world of ventilation standards and codes! But guess what? This isn’t new. Here’s a quote from the book Ventilation and Heating by John Shaw Billings, M.D.:“It is in the determination of [the ventilation rate] that the young architect or engineer is likely to find his chief difficulties, owing to the great divergence of opinion among the authorities to whom he will probably refer for guidance.”That was written in 1893. As it says in the Bible, there’s nothing new under the sun. Allison Bailes of Decatur, Georgia, is a speaker, writer, building science consultant, and the author of the Energy Vanguard Blog. Check out his in-depth course, Mastering Building Science at Heatspring Learning Institute, and follow him on Twitter at @EnergyVanguard. RELATED ARTICLESHow Much Fresh Air Does Your Home Need?Ventilation Rates and Human HealthDesigning a Good Ventilation System Resistance May NOT Be Futile in the Residential Ventilation WarsAn Interview with Dr. Joseph Lstiburek ASHRAE 62.2 Committee Chair Defends Ventilation StandardWhat is the Deal with Ventilation Requirements? GBA Encyclopedia: Ventilation Choices Just Right and Airtight Unintended Consequences Sucklast_img read more

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Toronto independent theatre battles back but the war isnt won

first_img Facebook Toronto’s real estate market continues to be the city’s favourite topic of conversation, between tenant protests over rent hikes in Parkdale, complaints about Airbnb rentals in Kensington Market and a Toronto Life cover story about a wealthy family renovating a former crack house.The conversation around who gets to live and work in downtown Toronto and for how much dominates our collective consciousness, which is something Toronto’s indie theatre community knows all too well.The past year has seen a major loss of independently run venues. Advertisement In both cases, the theatres had to scramble to find new spaces on very short timelines and, also in both cases, the outcry over the sudden closures was passionate and deeply felt. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementcenter_img Advertisement Login/Register With: Twitter Last August, Unit 102 Theatre lost its space at 376 Dufferin St., which for five years housed its own productions as well as those of other indie companies, when the building’s new owner cancelled its month-to-month lease.In January, the Storefront Theatre was evicted from a former drugstore at 955 Bloor St. W., where it had become an indie theatre hub over its four years of operation. The Storefront also lost its studio on Brunswick Ave. this summer, which functioned as a rental rehearsal and storage space. It subsequently had to sell physical assets like risers and chairs.last_img read more

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More controversy over wages and benefits at Sandy Bay School

first_imgAPTN National NewsA Manitoba Chief and his council are in a battle with a teacher’s union.Caught in the middle are the children of the Sandy Bay First Nation.APTN brought you this story in July and now more controversy over wages and benefits the teachers say are going unpaid at Sandy Bay School.APTN’s Shaneen Robinson has the chief’s side of the story.last_img

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