Man charged with murder of three year old boy in Derry

first_imgHomepage BannerNews Previous articleCouncillor McGarvey becomes oldest Mayor in IrelandNext articleLack of bus spaces on Buncrana Main St causing problems News Highland By News Highland – June 13, 2018 Facebook WhatsApp Twitter Pinterest Man charged with murder of three year old boy in Derry DL Debate – 24/05/21 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR A man’s been charged with murdering a three year old boy in Derry on Sunday September 17th 2017.The 23 year old man will appear at Derry’s Magistrates court later today.The child’s body was found in the Bogside area of Derry – a woman who was also arrested in connection with the death has been released pending an investigation. WhatsAppcenter_img Twitter Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Google+ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Facebook News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Pinterest Google+ Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA last_img read more

Read More →

Holiday Inn next to LaGuardia Airport faces foreclosure

first_img Full Name* The sale is planned for June 7, according to a notice that lists Brock Cannon and Daniel Fromm at Newmark as leading the sale. The winning bidder in the auction will still have to pay the senior mortgage of about $21 million.ADVERTISEMENTThe property is owned by Samcom 48 LLC, which was previously controlled by Wing Fung Chau and Aiyun Chen of Sun America Realty Group. In 2020, a memorandum of contract was signed by Chau and Chen to sell the hotel to Sam Strulovitch of Brooklyn.Chau and Chen did not agree to sell the parking structure next door, where they planned to build an eight-story, mixed-use apartment building.In 2016, Sam Chang’s McSam Hotel Group paid $37.6 million for the hotel property.Hotels have been decimated by the pandemic. Tourism and business travel remains a fraction of what it was a year ago. Lenders allowed many hotel owners to extend their loan payments, preventing defaults, but pockets of distress are increasingly showing up.Mack Real Estate recently gained control of a seven-hotel portfolio in Manhattan. The firm initiated UCC foreclosure proceedings against the owners of the properties, Hersha Hospitality Trust and Chinese investment firm Cindat Capital Management, after their joint venture defaulted on a mezzanine loan.UCC foreclosures, which can bypass the court system, are becoming more common as borrowers run into trouble on their loan payments. Traditional commercial mortgage foreclosures are temporarily barred under state law.Attempts to reach Chen were not successful.Contact Keith Larsen Share via Shortlink coronaDistressforeclosureHotelsmoinian groupQueens Holiday Inn at 37-10 114th Street in Corona, Queens (Google Maps)A Holiday Inn near LaGuardia Airport is facing foreclosure, a signal of looming distress for New York’s battered hospitality market.A mezzanine lender tied to Moinian Group is planning a UCC foreclosure sale of the equity interests in the 217-key hotel at 37-10 114th Street in Corona, Queens. The loan has a balance of $7.2 million.Read moreBainbridge launches $500M fund to buy distressed hotelsFour in five hotels backing CMBS loans show signs of distressWin for Moinian Group is bright spot for commercial landlords Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink Tags Email Address* Message*last_img read more

Read More →

SCC sets a ‘knockout’ Guinness world record

first_imgIf at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Last year’s Sophomore Class Council (SCC) kept this phrase in mind the past spring semester when they attempted to break the Guinness World Record for largest tournament of knockout basketball, a feat Keough Hall had fallen short of in the fall of 2011. The SCC achieved their goal March 2 when 433 people participated in the tournament in the Joyce Athletic and Convocation Center (JACC). The results were recently certified by Guinness. Junior Jake Frego, a member of last year’s SCC, said the council held the event to unite the sophomore class with a common goal. “Last year, one of the objectives of the SCC athletic committee was to help our class to realize a noteworthy achievement, and to have a great deal of fun while doing so,” he said. “We wanted the achievement to bring together our classmates and offer them some sort of subsequent recognition.” The council arranged with the men’s basketball team to hold the tournament immediately after the men’s last home game against Providence College. Keough Hall rector Fr. Pete McCormick, who spearheaded the attempt in the fall, said the collaboration helped the SCC succeed where Keough had come short. “They coordinated this whole event with men’s basketball and the community at large, and that was the reason we were able to make this happen,” he said. After the players exited, McCormick said everyone in the stands was invited to go down to the court and join the tournament. Frego said the participants included both students and members of the Notre Dame and South Bend communities. Throughout the tournament, the council took steps to ensure Guinness would validate the attempt if they broke the record. “We were required to inform Guinness of our record attempt and had to submit a very detailed description,” Frego said. On the day of the record attempt, McCormick said every participant was asked to sign a waiver, and the event was recorded. Guinness also required a counter who sat at the foul line to double-check that the names on the waivers were legitimate, and two witnesses not associated with the University to verify the event. Despite the success of the event, McCormick said he does not anticipate an immediate attempt to exceed the record. “For now there are no plans, but it’s one of those things that if some other school would try to break it or actually break it, then I would expect that we would try to regain that record,” he said. The event proved to be an extraordinary achievement for the class, Frego said. “We hoped to demonstrate that if Notre Dame students unite behind an effort, they can achieve something remarkable – even a Guinness World Record,” he said.last_img read more

Read More →

Bar governors reject three insurance ethics opinions

first_imgBar governors reject three insurance ethics opinions Bar governors reject three insurance ethics opinions Senior Editor After hearing there might be procedural problems, the Bar Board of Governors has rejected three proposed ethics opinions dealing with attorneys hired by insurance companies to represent policy- holders. The Board Review Committee on Professional Ethics, which had heard from several insurance company representatives the day before the board’s December 15 Coral Gables meeting, unanimously recommended that the opinions be rejected. “We were concerned by the procedures under which the opinions were promulgated [by the Professional Ethics Committee],” said board member Manny Morales, chair of the BRCPE. “One of the concerns that was raised by a representative of the insurance industry is our rules apparently do not allow for the procedure that was carried out here.” Morales said the committee didn’t necessarily agree that an error was made, but, “We reached the conclusion it was in the best interest of the Bar not to go forward because the rules are not 100 percent clear.” Insurance representatives said Bar rules require opinions come from questions asked by Bar members who actually face the ethical dilemma they are inquiring about. The three insurance opinions came after a Board of Governors member asked the Professional Ethics Committee for advice about potential conflicts for attorneys who are hired, both on staff and as outside counsel, to represent policyholders after they are sued. The three proposed advisory opinions have been under deliberation for around two years. All involve the obligations of attorneys hired by insurance companies to represent policyholders when they are sued. The proposed advisory opinions are: • PAO 99-2, which holds that an attorney hired by an insurance company to represent an insured may not provide information relating to the representation to an outside auditor at the request of the insurance company without the specific consent of the insured. Such consent cannot be implied by the contract between the insured and the insurance company. • PAO 99-3, which holds that an attorney is ethically prohibited from entering into an agreement with an insurance company to represent insureds where the attorney’s independent professional judgment and the client’s rights will be affected by restrictive billing practices imposed by the insurance company. • PAO 99-4, which holds that an attorney paid a salary by an insurance company to defend company insureds faces a potential conflict of interest. Absent an actual conflict, however, the attorney ethically may undertake such representation only if: the attorney reasonably believes that he or she can adequately represent the insured’s interests; the insured consents after consultation; the attorney’s professional independence in representing the insured is assured; the attorney honors the duty of confidentiality owed to the insured; and the attorney is not assisting the insurer in conduct constituting the unlicenced practice of law. Morales also recommended, and the board approved, having the Bar rule for promulgating ethics opinions reviewed to clear up the ambiguity that surfaced with these three PAOs. Morales said the Disciplinary Procedure Committee probably would be asked to look at the issue. The board’s action pleased the insurance representatives. “The flawed process used to develop the proposed advisory opinions led to significant substantive errors in the opinions,” said Katherine Giddings, who represents the American Insurance Association, one of about a half dozen insurance industry interests at the meeting. “We are very pleased with the board’s rejection of these proposed advisory opinions based on the flawed process,” she added. Giddings said the representatives will be working with the Bar on a related issue, a rule change requiring that policy- holders, when they are sued and an attorney is appointed to represent them, be given a statement outlining their rights. “We look forward to working with the board in implementing the statement of client’s rights once it’s approved by the Supreme Court,” she said. Board member David Bianchi, who chaired the special committee that proposed the insured client’s rights statement, said that would be going to the Supreme Court in February. The board approved a slight change in that proposed rule on Bianchi’s recommendation. He said the change, proposed by city attorneys, clarifies the rule does not apply to governmental entities, who frequently have their staff attorneys named to defend them. January 1, 2001 Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

Read More →

Do more to stop coronavirus price gouging, US states tell Amazon, Walmart, Facebook

first_imgThe steps include triggering price-gouging protections prior to emergency declarations in a state, being proactive in setting policies and restrictions on sellers instead of playing catch up and creating a “fair pricing” page where consumers can report incidents.“They should use their data and analytics tools to stop price spikes, not play whack-a-mole when they find something on their platform…We are seeing them handle this on a case-by-case basis, which is really not practical,” Shapiro told Reuters in an interview.The companies did not immediately respond to requests for comment.Read also: E-commerce platform Tokopedia shuts down COVID-19 profiteers A group of 32 US states have a message for the nation’s leading online platforms: You are not doing enough to stop price gouging amid the coronavirus crisis.In a letter sent on Wednesday to Amazon.com Inc, Walmart Inc, Facebook Inc and eBay Inc a bipartisan group of US attorneys general outlined specific steps it wants the online platforms to take to end this practice.Pennsylvania’s Josh Shapiro is leading the effort along with attorneys general from the states of Connecticut, Vermont and New Mexico. Shapiro said his office has received approximately 2,900 tips of price gouging on online platforms and brick-and-mortar stores in the past eight to nine days and issued 90 cease-and-desist orders to sellers engaged in the activity. He said if these orders fail to deter merchants, his office can fine them up to US$10,000 per violation.The issue of price-gouging on online platforms has become a hot topic among law enforcement agencies, officials and lawmakers as panicked consumers look to stock up on essential items during the outbreak.It also reflects the intense pressure online platforms are under to protect consumers while delivering goods during a pandemic.Earlier this week, Amazon said it had removed 3,900 seller accounts involved in this activity. In early March, the company said it is working with state attorneys general to identify and prosecute third-party sellers.A report by the US Public Interest Research Group released March 11, found nearly 1 in 6 of the products sold directly by Amazon had prices spike 50 percent higher than the 90-day average.“Even new protections by your company including heightened monitoring, bans on certain advertisements, and bans on selling certain items, have failed to remove unconscionably priced critical supplies,” the letter said.Topics :last_img read more

Read More →

Annenberg hosts annual USG presidential debate

first_imgIn light of rising discussion regarding students’ ability to challenge USG funding for events like Shapiro’s, Pruett asked the candidates about their stance on the decision to bring Shapiro to campus last semester and what they would do for similar situations in the future. Three presidential tickets discussed student health care, diversity and freedom of speech at the annual Undergraduate Student Government presidential debate Monday, hosted by Annenberg Media. Annenberg Media executive editor Charlotte Pruett moderated the debate between candidates Michaela Murphy and Meagan Lane, Trenton Stone and Mahin Tahsin and Maxwell Brandon and Grayson Adler, which nearly 150 students attended at Wallis Annenberg Hall. Lane said there should be a balance between student safety and well-being and due process for Greek organizations. Brandon said that from a safety standpoint, he does not see the benefit of the Department of Public Safety cracking down on Greek life and forcing such organizations to spread out throughout the community. Tahsin, a junior majoring in economics and business administration, began her opening remarks by explaining that she approached Stone to run as write-in candidates after realizing the student body should have more options. “Our campaign is built not only on hope, but on proof,” Murphy said. “We have spent this entire last year as senators working not only to improve existing resources, but to create ones of our own.” Murphy said her campaign’s position is that the approval of campus speakers requires deeper analysis. Murphy has voiced concerns about the delegation of USG funds for controversial speakers at past USG Senate meetings. “The positions of president and vice president are uniquely qualified, to not only serve the 19,000 undergraduates here, but you have a special task to protect the least protected on this campus,” Murphy said. “[You] certainly do not have … a constitutional nor intrinsic right to the student programming fee money of the communities which your rhetoric is further marginalizing. Full stop.” Murphy and Lane are both USG senators and Stone and Tahsin both serve as USG funding directors. Neither Brandon nor Adler have been involved with USG, but both are members of the USC chapter of Young Americans for Freedom, a group that brought conservative commentator Ben Shapiro to campus last October, prompting protests and backlash from several student groups. Adler said USC has better representation of black students on campus than UCLA and UC Berkeley, and Brandon spoke about the importance of outreach to children and teenagers who may apply to the University. “As a member of a Greek organization myself, I understand the challenges that come with inherent risks of being attached to a name like USC,” Lane said. “Also balancing having fun and being a 20-something-year-old kid in a sorority, and sometimes things happen, … but we want to see a balance with that.” Adler said he believes anyone has a right to speak on campus as long as their speech does not incite violence. He also thanked Stone and Tahsin for approving the funding for the event last semester. Adler said he and Brandon promise to donate their combined stipends, which add up to $18,000 per year according to the USG bylaws, to a cause of undergraduate students’ choosing each month. Lane said she doesn’t have the same ability to donate the paychecks she depends on. “I think that it is definitely more beneficial for the student’s enjoyment and safety to focus emphasis on containing parties to the Row by obviously having guidelines that do support safety,” Brandon said. “But also letting them feel that they could … promote brotherhood and sisterhood.” A previous version of this article contained an error. The article stated Lindsay Mahin was a sophomore Tahsin. Tahsin is a junior. The Daily Trojan regrets the error. Later, Pruett asked the candidates about the perceived crackdown on Greek life on campus and if they would work with fraternities and sororities during their presidencies. center_img The Trenton & Mahin ticket and Maxwell & Grayson ticket are both write-in presidential candidates, which announced their candidacies past the official filing deadline. Both tickets will be included on the official ballot when voting begins Feb. 5. “We do believe that Greek life is a fundamental tradition and is a tenet of the school,” Stone said. “But, in the end, we believe that Greek organizations deserve the same kind of respect and judicial process that other students receive … currently SJACS has some flawed measures in place.” All three tickets emphasized the need for reform in the Engemann Student Health Center, which the candidates said currently lacks resources for students. The candidates also discussed issues of funding in reference to mental health resources and on-campus counselors. Brandon began his opening statement by emphasizing that both he and Adler have deep history as legacy members of the Trojan family. Adler’s father is a member of USC’s Board of Trustees. Students had the opportunity to submit questions prior to and during the event. Calvin Carmichael, a freshman majoring in business administration (cinematic arts), asked the candidates about their plans to address the low percentage of black undergraduate students on campus, most recently reported by USC as 4.6 percent. Murphy, a junior majoring in public policy, began her opening statement by discussing how the USC administration has “failed its student body,” with a lack of transparency from the presidential search committee and throughout the ongoing investigation into the behavior of former campus gynecologist George Tyndall, who was  accused of sexual misconduct. “Our campaign slogan is ‘Bring Back Victory,’” Brandon said. “We want to restore the pride in USC. USC has a foundation of winning and quite frankly we don’t feel like USC wins anymore. Our traditions … [are] beginning to tarnish.” “Candidly, I’m very disappointed in that answer,” Murphy said. “[4.6] percent is a staggeringly low number … it doesn’t matter what top-tier institution we rank just behind … that’s horrible.” “Michaela and I understand that not everybody has the type of privilege to [donate their stipend],” Lane said. “If I didn’t get a scholarship, I wouldn’t be at USC … [Being a senator] is the only job I have right now. I’m taking 20 units, and my last paycheck still wasn’t even enough for my light bill.” According to their respective websites, UCLA’s undergraduate population is currently 5.2 percent black, while Berkeley’s is 3 percent. USG presidential tickets Trenton Stone and Mahin Tahsin (left), Michaela Murphy and Meagan Lane (center) and Maxwell Brandon and Grayson Adler (right) spoke about issues like funding and student health. (Ling Luo/Daily Trojan) After the candidates were asked about the problem of fake IDs in USC Village, the room erupted in laughter. While Stone said he plans to work with DPS as part of their general campaign platform, Brandon said he believes in students making their own decisions. Murphy said she believes there are “bigger fish to fry,” and Lane questioned the implication that USC Village caused a rise in fake ID usage when it has been an ongoing problem for the University. Voting for USG elections will take place online from Feb. 5 to 7. “After careful and extensive reflection, we decided to run as a presidential duo,” Tahsin said. “The undergraduate student body deserves an alternative choice in who best represents their interests.”last_img read more

Read More →