A’s reliever Yusmeiro Petit will honor his father in appropriate way

first_imgOAKLAND — Yusmeiro Petit, the A’s most dependable relief pitcher this season, is honoring his late father with a display of work ethic above and beyond what anyone should expect.Alberto Petit, 65, died of a heart attack on Thursday in Venezuela, prompting Yusmeiro to spend two days away from the team while sorting out his next move.He ultimately decided to remain with the A’s rather than return home, partly because travel logistics were going to be difficult, but mostly because he believes …last_img read more

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Media Club South Africa top 10 photos of the week

first_imgGet a taste of what’s on offer when you register with Media Club South Africa, with our weekly photo essay on the best photography from the site’s free image library.The image library is a free public service provided by Brand South Africa – there’s no catch. To view the library, and download photos in high resolution, all you need to do is register with the site. Registration is quick and easy, and gives you immediate access to the photos.But remember you can only republish images if you credit Media Club South Africa, including a hyperlink to the site if they’re published on the web. If you don’t credit the site you are liable for financial damages as set out in the image library terms and conditions of use.Here are our top 10 photos of the week, and where they can be found in the library.ABOVE: Phakisa shaft headgear catches the sun at Harmony Gold Mine in the town of Welkom in Free State province. Gold mining is one of the generally rural province’s main industrial activities.Photo: Graeme Williams Find this photo in the image library at Business & Industry 20. (Register and log in first.)ABOVE: A summer thunderstorm brews over the Maluti Mountains in the east of Free State province. The landscape is marked by flat agricultural plains rising to sandstone mountains on the border of the Kingdom of Lesotho, a high and remote mountainous country entirely surrounded by South African territory.Photo: Graeme Williams Find this photo at Countryside 19.ABOVE: Cape Town, Western Cape province: Fisherman use handlines to catch bottom fish off Cape Point south of Cape Town in Western Cape province. The fish they catch is mainly of a species known as hottentot, or black bream, as well as panga.The tip of Cape Point, the southernmost end of the Cape Peninsula, can be seen rising above the ocean in the top left of the photo, with its lighthouse just visible. False Bay lies between Cape Point and the promontory to the right, behind the back of the boat. Photo: Rodger Bosch Find this photo at South Africa at Work 20.LEFT: Cattle graze outside the village of Qunu in the Eastern Cape province, watched by Vuyani Sidubule, a young man wearing the clothes and white body paint of manhood initiation according to Xhosa tradition.Qunu is the home of Nelson Mandela, South Africa’s first democratically elected president, international statesman, and symbol of peace and reconciliation worldwide.Mandela grew up and went to school in Qunu, and tells in his autobiography Long Walk to Freedom how during his childhood in the village he looked after his uncle’s cattle, played with friends, splashed about in swimming holes, and slid down the “sliding stone”. This land still belongs to the Mandela clan.In the village of Qunu you can find the second Nelson Mandela Museum (the first is in the Eastern Cape city of Mthatha) and Mandela’s Eastern Cape home. You can view photos of both at Buildings & Structures 12. Photo: Rodger Bosch Find this photo at People 14.ABOVE: Loftus Versfeld Stadium in Pretoria, Gauteng province. Photo: Chris Kirchhoff Find this photo at 2010 Fifa World Cup 9.LEFT: Vines in close focus in the richly biodiverse indigenous forest of the Tsitsikamma National Park on the border of the provinces of Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal.Tsitsikamma is a a subtropical rainforest bisected by the Storms River, which breaks into the sea at the Storms River Mouth. Photo: Rodger Bosch Find this photo at Nature 12.ABOVE: A bakkie – a South African pickup truck – speeds along one of the the straight and seemingly endless roads of the Northern Cape.The Northern Cape is South Africa’s largest province, taking up a good third of the country’s land area. But it is generally arid and uninhabitable, with a population of some 2% of the national total. It is a starkly beautiful part of the country, and well worth a visit.The roads stretch out as far as the eye can see, with a flat landscape giving way to the ragged Richtersveld Mountains in the north – an area that has been named a World Heritage Site.Photo: Graeme Williams Find this photo at Infrastructure 19.ABOVE: The suburb of Sea Point in Cape Town, with the Lion’s Head mountain peak seen in the background, and a summer sky above.Lion’s Head is to the right of Table Mountain, when viewed from the Cape Town harbour. To the left of Table Mountain is Devil’s Peak.Photo: Jeffrey Barbee Find this photo at Cities 3.LEFT: Sitting alone at the top of a hill outside the Northern Cape town of Sutherland, the Southern African Large Telescope, or SALT, is the largest optical telescope of its kind in the world.The telescope forms part of the Southern African Astronomical Observatory installation in Sutherland, a town chosen by astronomers for its high elevation, clear skies, and remote night skies unpolluted by any lights from human development.Photo: Graeme Williams Find this photo at Buildings & Structures 11.LEFT: After South Africa’s first democratic elections in 1994, the new government went on a concerted drive to build cheap and affordable housing for the country’s poor, under its Reconstruction and Development Programme (RDP).Small, packed in straight rows and painted a rainbow of colours, these “RDP houses”, as they have come to be known, are a distinctive feature across the South African landscape. These RDP houses are on the KwaZulu-Natal North Coast.Photo: Hannelie Coetzee Find this photo at Development 7.To download these and some 2 000 other free high-resolution photos, register with Media Club South Africa. And don’t forget to read the Media Club South Africa image library terms and conditions of use.If you have queries or comments about the image library, or need help, don’t hesitate to contact us at [email protected]last_img read more

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Tlale returns to wow New York

first_imgA bold David Tlale brocade and chiffon dress in shades of grey.David Tlale will present his 2014 winter collection in New York on 5 September.(Images: David Tlale)MEDIA CONTACTS • Vista KalipaSpokesperson+27 11 482 3580.RELATED ARTICLES• Fashion week wows Jozi• SA fashion goes to New York• SA designer at London fashion week• Conquering the NY fashion world Lucille DavieLocal designer David Tlale is jetting off to New York again this week to participate in the Mercedes Benz Fashion Week, his third show at this event – and he is the only South African designer to have appeared at it.“Renowned for his undeniable knack for showmanship and elaborate designs, Tlale’s work is both daring and dramatic – a brand that defies convention and a brand that impenitently employs unpredictable use and understanding of fabric, colour and texture,” says Mercedes Benz Fashion Week.In September 2012, Tlale presented his spring collection in New York, and in February this year he showcased his men’s autumn collection, entitled Decadence. Now, on 5 September, he presents his 2014 winter collection. Before flying out, the award-winning designer offered a sneak peek of his collection, which consists of 28 pieces. It is a women’s collection, in which they are wrapped in silk brocade, silk organza, leather, woollens, and podesua or peau de soie.“The inspiration comes from the 1950s, and although it is not hardcore African, it has new-age Ndebele geometrics. It is epitomised by a line of lightning,” he explains. Colours range from bubble gummy, mint, and coral, to grey and lemon, capturing a “midday sun ray”.“There is a lot of craftsmanship, with beadwork,” he adds. “The silhouette is for the office, but also the red carpet with pencil skirts, beautiful shorts, and box-pleat, knee-length skirts, with layers. There’ll be black couture dresses, with beadwork. It will make women feel sexy.”But there will also be fun pieces, with the theme of “a new woman in town”. “She is edgy, powerful, very discerning, and likes the beautiful things. She is not apologetic but outstanding.” He adds that “as a brand I have been welcomed in New York. I must be doing something right!”Launch in 2003Tlale launched his brand 10 years ago in 2003 when he won the Elle New Talent competition, which was followed by The Sunday Times’ Best Designer Award. In 2005, he was appointed the head designer for Carducci Women by the House of Monatic Group in Cape Town. In 2007, he was one of four young South African designers chosen to present their couture collection at the Paris Couture week.The following year he was voted the most stylish designer at the South African Style Awards, at the same time was voted South Africa’s Star Designer of the Year. He was nominated for the Mercedes Benz Fashion and Art Awards, and was invited to judge the Elle New Talent competition, where his journey had begun five years beforehand.That year was special for other reasons: he designed a couture masterpiece for British super model Jordan Dunn for the closing show of the Virgin Mobile Cape Town Fashion Week, and he was chosen as ambassador for the Change-4-Ever campaign, which alleviates poverty in Southern Africa. He launched a Green Collection for the voluptuous women of Mzansi, including the likes of Judith Sephuma, Lebo Mashile, KG Moeketsi and Anele Mdoda.The next year marked a turning point for the Tlale brand when he won the Designer of the Year Award after showcasing his debut spring/summer 2010 ready-to-wear collection at the Africa Fashion Week Awards, hosted by the South Sudanese British supermodel Alek Wek. In the same year, he was named Fashion Designer of the Year at the Arise Africa Fashion Awards.He continued this strong presence in 2010 – at precisely midnight he showcased his Butterfly collection at Africa Fashion Week, during the year of the football World Cup. He was hailed as the “King of Fashion in South Africa”.Brand went bigger in 2011And in 2011 the brand went even bigger. Tlale closed the Nelson Mandela Bridge in Braamfontein, Johannesburg to present his autumn 2011 Made in the City collection with 92 models showcasing his designs. Besides models, celebrities and sports personalities strutted his stuff across the iconic bridge in celebration of Madiba’s 92nd birthday.Later that year, the South African Mint approached Tlale to celebrate his Climate Change collection with a coin minted in his honour. Still that year, Tlale opened his first boutique in the Michaelangelo Towers in Sandton, Johannesburg. He now has another boutique in Cape Town.This year, he launched a handbag range that is now sold across the country. “We are growing as a brand, maturing. The competition is getting tougher but our signature is our strength,” he says.He will be participating in Africa Fashion Week in October, giving top clients a preview beforehand. And he is going to make his designs available in the United States. He has signed up an agency there, and will be looking for a showroom in New York in the near future. “The journey will just continue.”last_img read more

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ReadWriteWeb Interview With Tim Berners-Lee, Part 2: Search Engines, User Interfaces for Data, Wolfram Alpha, And More…

first_imgIn part 2 of my one-on-one interview with Tim Berners-Lee, we explore a variety of topics relating to Linked Data and the Semantic Web. If you missed it, in Part 1 of the interview we covered the emergence of Linked Data and how it is being used now even by governments.In Part 2 we discuss: how previously reticent search engines like Google and Yahoo have begun to participate in the Semantic Web in 2009, user interfaces for browsing and using data, what Tim Berners-Lee thinks of new computational engine Wolfram Alpha, how e-commerce vendors are moving into the Linked Data world, and finally how the Internet of Things intersects with the Semantic Web.Semantic Web and Search Engines Like Google, YahooRWW: You’ve been talking about the Semantic Web for many years now. Generally the view is that Semantic Web is great in theory, but we’re still not seeing a large number of commercial web apps that use RDF (we’ve seen a number of scientific or academic ones). However we have begun to see some traction with RDFa (embedding RDF metadata into XHTML Web content), for example Google’s Rich Snippets and Yahoo’s SearchMonkey. Has the takeup of RDFa taken you by surprise?TBL: Not really, but the takeup by the search engines is interesting. In a way I was happy to see that, it was a milestone for those things to come out of the search engines. The search engines had typically not been keen on the Semantic Web – maybe you could argue that their business is making order out of chaos, and they’re actually happy with the chaos. And if you provide them with the order, they don’t immediately see the use of it.“The search engines have not been keen on the Semantic Web […] their business is making order out of chaos, and they’re actually happy with the chaos.”Also I think there was misunderstanding in the search engine industry that the Semantic Web meant metadata, and metadata meant keywords, and keywords don’t work because people lie. Because traditionally in information retrieval systems, keywords haven’t proven up to the task of finding stuff on the Web. One of the reasons is that people lie, the other is that they can’t be bothered to enter keywords. So keywords have gotten a bad reputation, then metadata in general was tarred with this ‘keywords don’t work’ brush. Because a lot of Semantic Web data included metadata, then people thought that with Semantic Web data — again, that people will lie and won’t have the time to produce it.Google rich snippets example; image credit: Matt CuttsNow I think there’s a realization that when you’re putting data online, that people are motivated NOT to lie. For example when your band is going to produce its next album, or when your band is going to play next downtown, you’re motivated to put that information up there on the Semantic Web. There’s an awful lot of cases when actually data is really important to people; and it’s on the web anyway. So I think it’s great that some of the search engine companies are starting to read RDFa.Does this mean that they will start to absorb the whole RDF data model? If they do, then they will be able to start pulling all of the linked data cloud in.“The web of linked data and the web of documents actually connect in both directions, with links.”Will they know what to do with it? Because when it’s data in a very organized form, I think some people have been misunderstanding the Semantic Web as being something that tries to make a better search engine – i.e. when you type something into a little box. But of course the great thing about the Semantic Web is that you can query it, you can ask a complicated query of the Semantic Web, like a SQL query (we call it a SPARQL query), and that’s such a different thing to be able to do. It really doesn’t compare to a search engine.You’ve got search for text phrases on one side (which is a useful tool) and querying of the data on the other. I think that those things will connect together a lot.So I think people will search using a search text engine, and find a webpage. On the front of the webpage they’ll find a link to some data, then they’ll browse with a data browser, then they’ll find a pattern which is really interesting, then they’ll make their data system go and find all the things which are like that pattern (which is actually doing a query, but they’ll not realize it), then they’ll be in data mode with tables and doing statistical analysis, and in that statistical analysis they’ll find an interesting object which has a home page, and they’ll click on that, and go to a homepage and be back on the Web again.So the web of linked data and the web of documents actually connect in both directions, with links.User Interfaces for Semantic ContentRWW: At the recent SemTech conference, Tom Tague of Thomson Reuters’ Calais project suggested that user interfaces for semantic content are key in getting more take-up. With that in mind, I wonder if you’ve seen some great interfaces or designs for semantic applications in recent months – if so which ones and why did they impress you?TBL: I think that whole area is very exciting at the moment. The only piece of hacking I’ve done over the past few years has been on a thing called the Tabulator [a data browser and editor], which is addressing exactly that. Partly because I wanted to be able to look at this data. And now there are lots of different ways that people need to be able to look at data. You need to be able to browse through it piece by piece, exploring the world of data. You need to be able to look for patterns of particular things that have happened. Because this is data, we need to be able to use all of the power that traditionally we’ve used for data. When I’ve pulled in my chosen data set, using a query, I want to be able to do [things like] maps, graphs, analysis, and statistical stuff.W3C Tabulator, a data browser/editor; Image credit: wiwiss.fu-berlin.deSo when you talk about user interfaces for this, it’s really very very broad. Yes I think it’s important. There’s also the distinction we can make between the generic interfaces and the specific interfaces.There will always be specific interfaces; for example if you’re looking at calendar data, there’s nothing else like a calendar that understands weeks, months and years. If you’re looking at a genome, it’s good to have a genetics-specific user interface.“I want to be able to do maps, graphs, analysis, and statistical stuff.”However you also need to be able to connect that data, through generic interfaces. So if my genome data was taken during an experiment which happened over a particular period, I need to be able to look at that in the calendar – so I can connect the genetics to the calendar.So one of the things I hope to see is domain-specific things for various different domains, and the generic user interfaces. And hopefully the generic interfaces will be able to tie together all of the domains.Wolfram Alpha and Natural Language InterfacesRWW: An interesting new product was launched this year called Wolfram|Alpha, described as a ‘computational knowledge engine.’ It’s kind of a mix between Google (search) and Wikipedia (knowledge), and its key attribute is that enables you to compute something. The founders think that ‘computing’ things on the fly is something we’re going to see a lot of in future. What’s your take on Wolfram|Alpha?TBL: There are two parts to that sort of technology. One of them is a sort of stilted natural language interface. We’ve seen those sort of natural language queries for years. Boris Katz [from W3C] created a system called START[a software system designed to answer questions that are posed to it in natural language]. I think with the Semantic Web out there, those sorts of interfaces are going to become important, very valuable, because people will be able to ask more complicated things. The search engine has traditionally been limited to just a phrase, but some of the search engines are now starting to realize that if they put data behind them and have computation engines, then you can ask things like ‘what’s this many pounds in dollars?’ and so on. So yes, those interfaces will become important.“Those sorts of interfaces will become important […] people will be able to ask more complicated things.”Conversational interfaces have always been a really interesting avenue. We’ve had voice browser work in W3C, that has been an interesting alternative avenue. It’s possible that as compute power goes up, we’ll see a prolifieration of machines capable of doing voice. It’ll move from the mainframe to being able to run on a laptop or your phone. As that happens, we’ll get actual voice recognition and pattern natural language at the front end. That will perhaps be an important part of the Semantic Web. Tags:#Interviews#Semantic Web#web Related Posts richard macmanus A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting We talked before about what a great challenge the Semantic Web is going to be from a user interface point of view. Conversational interfaces are going to be part of [solving] that. Of course it’s also going to be really valuable to have compositional interfaces – for the visually impaired and so on.Wolfram|Alpha is also a large curated database of data sets. Obviously I’m interested in the big data set which is out there, which is Linked Data. This everybody can connect to. I don’t really know a lot about the internals of Wolfram|Alpha’s data set. I don’t know whether they’re likely to put any of it out on the web as Linked Data – that might be an interesting addition. I imagine that quite a lot of it may have come from the web of Linked Data.e-Commerce and Linked DataRWW: There have been reports recently that both Google and Yahoo will be supporting the Good Relations ontology and linked data for e-commerce. Companies such as Best Buy are already putting out product information in RDFa. What would be your advice to e-commerce vendors right now, to help them transition to this world of structured data on the Web. The same question could be asked across many verticals, but e-commerce seems like one area which has some momentum right now. Would you advise them just to put out their data as Linked Data?TBL: Yup! Certainly this year is the year to do it. I’ve been advising governments to do it and when you look at an enterprise, you find that a lot of the issues are the same. But when you put your data from government or enterprise out there, make sure you don’t disturb existing ecosystems. Don’t threaten those systems, because you’ve spent years building them up.Maybe there’s an analogy with when the Web first started and the first bookshops went online. They were more or less a flyer, saying ‘hey we have a great bookshop at 23 Main St, come on down!’. Let’s say that a person named Joe owned one of these early online bookshops. If somebody had suggested to Joe that he should put his catalog online, Joe would’ve felt that that was very proprietary data. And he’d be worried that other bookshops would see where he was weak, so they’d be able to advertise themselves as filling that niche he’s weak in.“When you put your data out there, make sure you don’t disturb existing ecosystems.”But when his competitors Fred and Albert put their catalogs online, then Joe can check which books people are browsing at Fred and Albert’s websites. So Joe would [finally] be pursuaded to put his book catalog up online. But he doesn’t put up the prices… until Albert and/or Fred does. And even if catalog and pricing is up there, nobody puts their stock levels online. And there was a period of time when nobody [i.e. online booksellers] had their stock levels up. But people got fed up with ordering stuff that wasn’t in stock. So the first book shop to actually tell you about stock levels suddenly was then unbelievably attractive to its customers.So there’s this syndrome of progressive competitive disclosure. This happens when people realize that if you’re going to do business with somebody, if you’re going to have your partners up and down the supply chain, really it’s useful to check the data web – and life goes much more quickly and open.Best Buy may be what starts the ball rolling [among e-commerce vendors]. Now if I want to look out for what [products are] available, I can write a program to see what there is. If somebody wants to compete with Best Buy, to my program they’ll be invisible unless they can get their data up in RDF. Doesn’t matter whether they use RDFa or RDF XML, as long as it maps in a standard fashion to the RDF model, then they will be visible.The Internet of ThingsRWW: I’m fascinated by how the Internet is becoming more and more integrated into the real world. For example the Internet of Things, where everyday objects become Internet connected via sensors. Have you been following this trend closely too, and if so what impact do you think this will have on the Web in say 5 years time?TBL: It connects very much with Semantic Web [and] with linked data. With Linked Data you’ve got the ability to give a thing a URI. So I can give a URI to my phone, and I can say that’s my phone in Linked Data. And also the company that made it can give a URI to the model of the phone. They can also put online all the specs of the phone, and then I can make a link to say that my phone is an example of that product. So now any system which is dealing with me and has access to that data will be able to figure out the sorts of things I can do with my phone, which actually is really valuable. Especially if the phone breaks.“The Semantic Web is a web of things, conceptually. Tying an actual thing down to a part of the web is the last mile.”The Semantic Web has already given URIs to things, and to types of things. When the things themselves have an RFID chip in them, then I think it’s a very exciting world. One can take that RFID chip, go to the Internet and find out the data about the thing. Whether we’ll be able to do that, whether the manufacturers will be open enough to allow me to turn data about the identifier of the thing into data about the thing, is yet to be seen. But it’s a very exciting idea.Pachube, an example of the Internet of Things (see ReadWriteWeb profile)Similarly, I’d like to be able to scan a barcode and get back nutritional information about what’s in – for example – a can of food. But we don’t have that yet. To get that sort of thing, which is very powerful, we need to build look-up systems, which allow you to translate an RFID code or a barcode into an HTTP address.The Semantic Web is a web of things, conceptually. Tying an actual thing down to a part of the web is the last link – the last mile. Give the thing a notion of its own identity in the web.ConclusionRWW: The over-riding message in both Part 1 and 2 of our interview with Tim Berners-Lee, is for companies and organizations to make their data available online. Preferably as Linked Data, which uses a subset of Semantic Web technologies. But Berners-Lee noted, in Part 1 of our interview, that he’d even be happy with the data in CSV (comma separated values) format.It’s clear that we’ve seen a lot of progress in linked data already in 2009. In upcoming posts on ReadWriteWeb, we’ll continue to track this trend and explain how organizations can contribute their data. Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

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CBSE hikes exam fees SCST general category to pay more

first_imgNew Delhi: The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) has increased the fees of Class 10 and 12 board examinations for SC and ST students from Rs 50 to Rs 1,200, while the amount has been doubled for those from the general category, who will now have to pay Rs 1,500.The students appearing for the Class 10 board exams are registered for it when in Class 9, and those appearing for Class 12 are registered when in Class 11. The board notified the changes in the fees last week and has asked the schools who had already begun the registration process and charged students as per the old fee structure, to now collect the difference in amount. Also Read – India gets first tranche of Swiss bank a/c detailsAccording to the revised norms, the Scheduled Caste and Scheduled Tribe students will have to pay Rs 1,200 for five subjects, while earlier they were supposed to pay Rs 50 for the same, a hike of 24 times. The general category students who were paying Rs 750 earlier, will now pay Rs 1,500 for five subjects. “The fees is applicable for both Class 10 and 12 examinations,” a senior CBSE official said. For appearing for an additional subject in Class 12 board examination, the SC and ST students who were earlier not supposed to pay any extra fee will now have to pay Rs 300. General category students will also have to pay Rs 300 for an additional subject, instead of Rs 150 earlier.last_img read more

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World Travel Awards arrives in Bogotá ahead of Latin America Gala Ceremony

first_img Mazagan Beach & Golf Resort to host World Travel Awards Grand Final 2015 Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:san bartolome, teatro colon, world travel awards Diamonds La Gemma dell’Est to host World Travel Awards Africa & Indian Ocean Gala Ceremony 2016 Sandals Resorts International Honored At Annual World Travel Awards Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppBogotá, October 6th, 2015 – World Travel Awards has arrived in Colombian capital Bogotá as final preparations begin for the Latin America Gala Ceremony 2015.Hundreds of industry leaders from across the region are expected to attend the red carpet ceremony on Saturday, October 10th, with presentations taking place in Teatro Colón.The ceremony will be followed by a sumptuous banquet of traditional cuisine with a modern twist in Colegio Mayor de San Bartolomé.Speaking ahead of the event, World Travel Awards President Graham Cooke said: “It is an honour to be welcomed to Colombia for the first time and a privilege to host our annual Latin America Gala Ceremony 2015 here in Bogotá.“The Latin America Gala Ceremony has grown tremendously in recent years, and I look forward to welcoming the elite of both Central and South America tourism to the event on Saturday.”A full list of nominees can be seen here.World Travel Awards Gala Ceremonies are widely regarded as the best networking opportunities in the travel industry, attended by government and industry leaders, luminaries, and international print and broadcast media.There is more information on the official website. Recommended for youlast_img read more

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