Ojibwe girl who refused chemotherapy dies from stroke reports

first_imgAPTN National NewsNEW CREDIT – Makayla Sault, the 11-year old girl who made national news after refusing chemothereapy has died.According to a statement posted on the Two Row Times website, Sault died of a stroke.“After a valiant fight, almost a year from diagnosis, our daughter, Makayla Sault suffered a stroke on Sunday morning that she just couldn’t recover from.Surrounded by the love and support of her family, her community and her nation – on Monday, January 19 at 1:50 PM, in her 12th year, Makayla completed her course. She is now safely in the arms of Jesus.Makayla was on her way to wellness, bravely fighting toward holistic well-being after the harsh side effects that 12 weeks of chemotherapy inflicted on her body.Chemotherapy did irreversible damage to her heart and major organs. This was the cause of the stroke.We continue to support Makayla’s choice to leave chemotherapy. At this time we request privacy from the media while we mourn this tragic loss.”After 11 weeks of chemotherapy at McMaster hospital in Hamilton, Sault asked her parents to stop.McMaster asked children’s aid to intervene in the case to force the girl to return to treatment. Brandford Children’s Aid refused.last_img read more

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Political panel heats up over bill aiming to change how energy projects

first_imgNation to NationThere used to be a time when Conservative governments cared about the environment says Liberal MP Marc Miller.“They don’t anymore,” said Miller on Nation to Nation Thursday.“They just care about a shrinking base.”Which is why the Conservatives are feeding into the base – heading into a fall election – when they say Bill C-69 will kill pipelines he added.“So absolutely false,” responded Conservative MP Cathy McLeod, “that we do not care about the environment but what we don’t want put in place is a process that does nothing for environment but increases red tape across the country.”It was rare show of combativeness for Miller, a regular on Nation to Nation, who usually sticks to party lines on any topic.The exchange followed a line of questioning on the new Indigenous languages bill that both agreed was a good idea.But when it came to resource development the Liberal and Conservative butted heads even though they both want Trans Mountain pipeline expanded.Where they differ is how similar projects are approved which is what Bill C-69 is about, including overhauling the federal review process.It’s currently before the Senate and expected to be kicked back over the House of Commons with amendments before becoming law.McLeod, like many in the resource sector, don’t want it to get that far.“I think this bill needs to be killed. This is a no more pipelines bill. It will drive away investment,” she said. “I think it’s a bill looking for a solution where there was no problem.”That’s not exactly true said Miller.“If you are for killing C-69 you’re for that process that led to the TMX mess that Conservatives created,” he said.He’s speaking of the Trans Mountain pipeline approval that a Federal Court later overturned for not properly consulting Indigenous people.The lack of consultation mostly happened under the previous Stephen Harper government through the National Energy Board that recommended Canada proceed with the expansion from Edmonton, Alta. to Burnaby, B.C.But final approval was given by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who believed his government’s own review of the National Energy Board approval, along with speaking, briefly, to First Nations affected by the pipeline route was enough consultation.Now the Trudeau government says they are trying to get it right and listening to courts.“This bill plugs a lot of holes that were created by the previous government and allows Indigenous consultation, reliance on science and not some partisan approval that just jams things through,” said Miller.That includes the Harper government eliminating thousands of preliminary screenings of projects the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency did each year down to less than 100 said Green party leader Elizabeth May.But Trudeau isn’t looking to increase the number.“Under the current legislation most federal projects will never see a review,” said May.That means if a First Nation has a problem with a project there likely won’t be an initial environmental assessment where that issue can be raised.Then things get weird with the bill, said May, because she and Conservatives agree on something.“The pro-pipeline people of this bill have decided this bill is a bill to stop pipelines because there is a lot of ministerial discretion. In other words, the minister of Environment can step up at various points in the process and say this project is approved or this project is turned down before the process of review is even complete,” said May.She agreed that the minister should not have that level of discretion.“You should make sure you reviewed a project fully and then a minister can make the ultimate decision. There’s no need for that kind of discretion,” said May. “So on that, and on that only, I would agree with Conservative senators.”Yet, she believes the bill can be fixed.It just needs good [email protected]last_img read more

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Sourcegraph a code search and navigation engine is now open source

first_imgThe Sourcegraph team announced that they’re making Sourcegraph, a self-hosted code search and navigation engine, available as open source, earlier this week. “We opened up Sourcegraph to bring code search and intelligence to more developers and developer ecosystems—and to help us realize the Sourcegraph master plan,” writes Quinn Slack on the announcement page. This Sourcegraph master plan involves making basic code intelligence ubiquitous (for every language, and in every editor, code host, etc.). It wants to focus on making code review continuous and intelligent. Additionally, they also hope to increase the amount and quality of open-source code. Sourcegraph comprises the following features: Instant Code Search: Fast global code search with a hybrid backend. This combines a trigram index with in-memory streaming. You can search in files and diffs in your code by just using simple terms, regular expressions, and other filters. Code intelligence: It offers code intelligence for many languages using the Language Server Protocol. It also makes browsing code and finding references on your code easier. Data Center: Once you grow to hundreds or thousands of users and repositories, you can graduate from the single-server deployment to a highly scalable cluster using the Sourcegraph Data Center. Integrations: It offers Integration with third-party developer tools via the Sourcegraph Extension API. Organizations that are already using the Sourcegraph navigation engine can upgrade to Sourcegraph Enterprise (previously called Data Center) to get a hand on features that large organizations need such as single sign-on, backups, and recovery, cluster deployment, etc. However, these additional features that come with the Enterprise edition are paid and not open source. “We’re also excited about what this means for Sourcegraph as a company. All of our customers, many with hundreds or thousands of developers using Sourcegraph internally every day, started out with a single developer spinning up a Sourcegraph instance and sharing it with their team. Being open-source makes it even easier to start using Sourcegraph in that way”, explained the announcement page. For more information, check out the official announcement. Read Next Facebook open sources LogDevice, a distributed data store for logs Kong 1.0 launches: the only open source API platform specifically built for microservices, cloud, and serverless Uber’s Marmaray, an Open Source Data Ingestion and Dispersal Framework for Apache Hadooplast_img read more

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