Europe not out of sight – Monk

first_img “The carrot (of Europe) is there for us as we have got Arsenal away, Man City home and Crystal Palace away. They are tough games,” Swansea manager Monk said. “We are under no illusions how tough it will be, but if we perform like we did in the second half, in those games we will be a handful for anyone. “It is feasible to get into Europe but we keep our feet firmly on the ground here. “This game was about consolidating our place in the top 10 and we are in control of that eighth spot now. “We have beaten our best points tally and you have to find new things to fight for.” Ecuador winger Montero broke the deadlock with a first goal in English football since his £4million summer switch from Mexican club Monarcas Morelia, a 76th-minute diving header at the far post. Ki then settled matters with his eighth goal of the season in stoppage time after coming off the bench in the closing stages. “I don’t think Jeff has scored too many goals with his head and everyone is happy for him,” Monk said. Late goals from Jefferson Montero and Ki Sung-yueng almost guaranteed that Swansea will end the season in the top eight – their highest-ever finish in the Barclays Premier League. But Swansea are now only four points adrift of Southampton following their surprise defeat at Sunderland – and seventh place could be enough for Europa League qualification if Arsenal beat Aston Villa in the FA Cup final at the end of May. Garry Monk feels Swansea are in the race for Europe after beating Stoke 2-0 at the Liberty Stadium. “I had a few words with them at half-time as the first half we were at 70 per cent. “The tempo of our passing was not where it should have been but we were so dominant in the second half and deserved to win the game.” Stoke had defender Marc Wilson sent off in the 85th minute for two bookable offences but manager Mark Hughes felt his side paid the price for lacking an attacking edge. “The second half we didn’t really ask too many questions of Swansea,” the Welshman said. “I thought we were very comfortable in the first half. We had the majority of possession without really having that cutting edge in the final third. “Our retention of the ball wasn’t quite good enough to get people up the pitch and in the box. “Our creative play was missing and that was disappointing because I felt it was a real opportunity to get something out of the game.” On Wilson’s dismissal – the first time Stoke have had a player sent off in the Premier League this term – Hughes said: “The first was a coming together and probably looked more than it was. “It was a foul but I’m not sure if it was yellow card. But when you’ve got a yellow card you’ve got to steer clear of those situations Marc found himself in. “He’s tripped the lad going through and unfortunately he’s had to go off, and from that point it was difficult to affect the game.” Press Associationlast_img read more

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Quick Louisville goals to start halves doom Syracuse in upset bid

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on October 27, 2010 at 12:00 pm Contact Michael: [email protected] | @Michael_Cohen13 Jakob Karlgren experienced this feeling before. This wasn’t the first time he’d seen his team concede a goal in the game’s opening moments. That familiar ‘here we go again’ mentality eventually crept into his head. ‘It’s been the story of the season pretty much for us,’ he said. ‘It’s too bad.’ If ever there was a time this season that the Syracuse men’s soccer team needed to avoid a slow start, it was Wednesday night. The Orange was taking on its highest-ranked opponent in a decade. Louisville, the No. 2 team in the country, certainly didn’t need any added advantages. But SU gave them two. Syracuse (2-9-5, 0-5-3 Big East) allowed a goal in the first six minutes of each half and couldn’t battle back against one of the nation’s best teams. The Orange ultimately fell, 2-1, to the Cardinals (13-0-2, 8-0-0 Big East) in front of 722 fans at the SU soccer stadium. Karlgren tied the game near the end of the first half, but SU couldn’t muster a second equalizer to force overtime. Louisville dominated possession in both halves and prevented the Orange from creating more than a handful of scoring chances.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text As Karlgren accurately stated, early goals have been an issue for the team this season. With the Cardinals scoring their first goal in the game’s seventh minute, it was the 11th goal the Orange has given up in the first 30 minutes of games this season. Of those 11, four have been conceded in the first ten minutes. ‘It’s been, unfortunately, a trend this year,’ SU head coach Ian McIntyre said. ‘It’s great to say that we’re resilient and we bounce back, but it would be nice to score that first goal. The Cardinals struck first on a through-ball that split Karlgren and fellow defender David Neumann. Louisville’s Dylan Mares controlled the pass and bent a shot around SU goalkeeper Jeremy Vuolo and into the bottom right corner. But as has been the case, Syracuse responded. Much like it did against Villanova last Wednesday, the Orange hung in there against a better team and evened the score. Karlgren got his head on a cross by midfielder Nick Roydhouse in the 36th minute to put Syracuse on the board. ‘Yeah, you’re worried (after conceding an early goal),’ McIntyre said. ‘But I was interested to see how we would react. And I thought we reacted well.’ Heading into the half, Syracuse had the momentum. It was tied 1-1 with the No. 2 team in the country, and it was well on its way to earning a result that would help sneak into the Big East tournament. And in the early minutes of the second half, the Orange dominated the Cardinals. Twice in the opening five minutes, SU had legitimate scoring chances. A shot by Mark Brode sent a roar through the crowd before the whole stadium realized it had only hit the side netting. ‘The shot I took that everyone thought went in, we were feeling it at that point of the game,’ Brode said. But in seconds, that feeling was gone. With a single pass, Louisville showed why it is the conference’s best team. The Cardinals’ Kenney Walker made a tackle on SU midfielder Mawuena Agbossoumonde just outside his own penalty box and started a counter attack. His ball in behind the Syracuse defense gave teammate Colin Rolfe a breakaway, and he buried a shot into the upper left corner of the goal. In an instant, Syracuse went from being on the verge of taking the lead to being down 2-1. ‘It is a bit of a sucker punch,’ McIntyre said. ‘I think it’s a little bit of naivety, but also you give credit (to Louisville). They’ve got a lot of pace. We got caught attacking, got dispossessed, and they quickly turned that in and we got exposed.’ From that point forward, the Cardinals toyed with the Orange by possessing the ball for minutes at a time. Louisville put together more than 20 consecutive passes at one point. Syracuse was forced to chase, and its fatigue began to increase. ‘It’s always mentally tough to always chase the ball,’ Karlgren said. ‘It’s tough to chase the whole time and be one goal down.’ But it all comes back to giving up early goals. If the Orange doesn’t concede, it doesn’t have to chase. And by coming out five minutes too late, Syracuse came away with nothing. ‘We started on our heels both first and second half,’ Vuolo said. ‘Unfortunately, we had to pay for it. If we don’t start that slow, we come away with a point or three points.’ [email protected]center_img Commentslast_img read more

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Court in Session: The NFL’s new CBA prioritizes profit over players’ well-being

first_imgBut by putting the players – especially the roughly 60% of players who make the current minimum salary – in a position where they would not have benefited financially by opposing the CBA, the NFL got away with neglecting its obligation to ensure its players’ long-term safety and well-being. On March 15, the NFL Players Association voted to approve a new collective bargaining agreement proposed by NFL owners that will remain in effect for the next 10 years. Despite public objections to the initial terms that the Players Association secured in its negotiations with the NFL by a handful of high-profile players, enough rank-and-file NFLPA members supported the agreement to ensure its passage. It is not difficult to discern why the majority of voting NFLPA members favored the labor agreement’s passage: The players voted in their short-term financial interest. The new agreement will bump the players’ share of the NFL’s revenue pie from 47% to 48% and will gradually increase the current minimum player salary of $510,000 to $1.065 million by 2030, including an immediate $100,000 raise for the 2020 season. It also contains player-friendly provisions narrowing the scope of the NFL’s drug-testing regime – eliminating suspensions for players who test positive for marijuana – and increasing retirees’ pensions. The new CBA is set to last 10 seasons, with no opt-out provisions for either side. That means the CBA’s provisions exacerbating the game’s physical toll on players – which have already been widely criticized for doing so – are locked into place for the next 10 years. The average NFL career is 2.5 years long, a statistic that demonstrates the value of one game on NFL players’ physical welfare. This figure is attributed in large part to the physical toll incurred by playing professional football. But even if NFL owners are more concerned about their own profit than players’ health, there is still reason to temper the league’s adverse physical impact on players rather than exacerbate it. Adding an additional game for every team might seem insignificant, but it is bound to have detrimental effects on players whose bodies and brains are already pushed to the brink of permanent deterioration under the current schedule format. Jake Mequet is a junior writing about sports and law. His column, “Court in Session,” typically runs every other Monday. Based on the trajectory at which CTE became a widely known, controversial issue, one can only guess the magnitude of controversy that the NFL will be subject to by the time its new CBA expires in 2030. Rather than making the difficult decisions necessary to protect players, NFL owners have decided to seek short-term profit at the expense of their players’ permanent health and the sport’s long-term success. The physical impact of additional games will matter, even if it is only one to two more games for every team each season. Every added week of playing means more hits, leading to more brain trauma and more injuries as well as untold long-term pain. In an article for Bleacher Report, former NFL player Ryan Riddle described the physical toll incurred by players during each NFL season. Extensive research in the past two decades has shed light on the adverse long-term health effects of playing in the NFL, especially relating to the high incidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy in former NFL players. The new labor agreement is poised to exacerbate the stress imposed on players’ bodies and minds and gives NFL owners the opportunity to add a 17th regular-season game starting in 2021 — which they will welcome given the prospect of increased revenue. It also bumps the number of teams that make the playoffs from 12 to 14 each year, thus providing for two additional playoff games during Wild Card Weekend. Owners don’t seem to care much about the growing perception of their league as exploitative and dangerous, but they should. However, though the CBA will financially benefit players league-wide, it lacks the structural reforms needed to make the professional football business model sustainable for the long-term. Illustrating the extent to which public opinion can evolve in 10 years is the issue of CTE. As of 2010, evolving academic research had identified the link between CTE and playing in the NFL. This, along with depictions of CTE in popular culture such as the 2015 film “Concussion” and the speculated role of CTE in tragedies like Junior Seau’s 2012 suicide and Aaron Hernandez’s 2013 murder of Odin Lloyd and his eventual death by suicide, the brain health of football players has become a hot-button issue in 2020. The NFL has adopted rules minimizing the number of helmet-to-helmet hits — which have been identified as the primary cause of brain trauma — but the new CBA seems to suggest that the NFL is backsliding on this issue. “With every fall, every tackle, every forearm to the rib cage and helmet flying at you like a torpedo, the damage and physical stress you accumulate over time wear away at the body’s ability to combat such an onslaught of external forces,” Riddle said.last_img read more

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Hearts exit drop zone

first_imgAccra Hearts of Oak are out of the relegation zone, at least for now, following a crucial 2-1 victory over Mighty Jets in match day 20 of the premier league.League leaders Berekum Chelsea posted a vital 1-0 home win against Dwarfs whilst Kumasi Asante Kotoko drew 1-1 with New Edubiase.The full results are as follows;Chelsea 1– 0DwarfsBA Stars FC 1 – 0 All StarsEdubiase FC 1 – 1 Asante Kotoko Aduana Stars 0– 0 Liberty ProfessionalsHearts of Oak 2 – 1Mighty JetsKing Faisal 0– 0AshantiGold FCReal Tamale United 3 – 0 Heart of LionsMedeama SC 2– 1Arsenals Source: Myjoyonline.com/Ghanalast_img read more

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Bismark Adjei-Boateng pens deal with Man City

first_imgGhana youngster Bismark Adjei-Boateng has signed a new deal with English giants Manchester City after completing a successful year on loan with Norwegian champions Stromsgodset.The was youngster lined alongside club team-mates Abdisalam Ibrahim and fellow RtD gradaute Razak Nuhu and impressed from midfield, scoring eight goals in 20 games as Stromsgodset won their first title in 43 years.Boateng has been Ghana’s most prolific midfielder in Europe this season following his exploits in Norway.With the season now over, Boateng, a product of the Right to Dream Academy, has flown back to Manchester to pen his new deal with Manuel Pellegrini and will now take a short break in Ghana before returning to Norway for another season.“I enjoyed playing alongside Abdi and playing my first full season at senior level,” said Boateng. “I had to work my way into the team, starting mainly from the bench and then earning a regular starting spot.“The race for the title went until the final day of the season because Rosenberg could still overtake us. We were playing third-placed Haugesund but we won 4-0 to make sure we were champions.“It’s been so many years that our fans just went crazy and were partying in the streets. Now we have the chance of entering next season’s Champions League, though we have to go through a qualifying process first.”A fast, ball-winning midfielder, Boateng models his game on Yaya Toure and is hoping to play alongside him for the Blues one day.“Though the standard in Norway is not as high as the Premier League, it’s probably on a par with the Championship,” he said. “It used to more kick and run football but last season a lot of teams were trying to play more of a passing game so things are improving. The only thing I found difficult was the cold at the start of the season – it was freezing! Even Manchester seems warm compared with Stromsgodset!“There are three Ghanaians at Stromsgodset with Razak and Adam Larsen Kwarasey and myself which helped me settle into Norwegian life really well. We have a couple of Norwegian internationals and a good manager in Ronny Deila and I have formed a great understanding with Abdi which I hope I we can continue next year.”A Ghana Under-17s international, Boateng is not expecting to force his way into the World Cup-bound national team for Ghana just yet. Ghana beat Egypt 6-1 in the first leg of their African World Cup play-off and have all-but booked their place in Brazil.“I’m looking forward to playing for Stromsgodset again but further down the line, I can’t wait to come back and train alongside players like Yaya Toure at City.“I’m going to go home to Ghana for a month now and see my father, two kid sisters and brother,” said Boateng who will hope to follow in the footsteps of fellow countrymen Michael Essien, Sulley Muntari and Kevin-Prince Boateng (no relation). “After that it’s back to work and I’m really happy to have signed a new deal with City and look forward to returning with another year of senior football under my belt.”last_img read more

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Kliff Kingsbury to give Cardinals cellphone breaks during meetings

first_imgHe went on to explain Tuesday during the NFL owners’ meetings that the effort is intended to keep the players focused during the sessions. The breaks will come every 20 or 30 minutes when he sees players “itching to get to those” phones.”You start to see kind of hands twitching and legs shaking, and you know they need to get that social media fix, so we’ll let them hop over there and then get back in the meeting and refocus,” Kingsbury said, via ESPN. Related News Cardinals coach Kliff Kingsbury is taking a unique approach to running his team meetings as he embarks on his first season with Arizona.Kingsbury will introduce cellphone breaks at Cardinals meetings so players can “get that social media fix.” “So if we’ve got to split it up or have shorter meetings, that’s what we do.”The Cardinals are coming off a league-worst 3-13 season, missing the playoffs for a third straight year. Arizona enters next month’s draft with the No. 1 overall pick. Giants opens to Josh Rosen talks as Cardinals’ draft plans remain unclear Kingsbury’s strategy is to adjust his meetings to the players, helping them maximize their focus rather than just asking them to sit for longer stretches. Kingsbury explained he used this approach while coaching at Texas Tech for six seasons before he was hired by Arizona to replace coach Steve Wilks.”I think coming from the college ranks to obviously, those young men, it’s got to be quick hitters, 20 minutes at a time, give them a break and get them back in,” Kingsbury said. “We want to make sure that when we have them, they’re focused, and they’re locked in, and we’re maximizing their time.last_img read more

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OPEC members expected to agree cut in crude production

first_imgVIENNA — OPEC members are meeting to agree on their response to recent declines in oil prices, with analysts predicting a cut in production of at least 1 million barrels per day.Crude prices began falling in October and continued to plunge last month because of oversupply and fears weaker global economic growth would dampen energy demand. The price of both benchmark U.S. crude and the standard for internationally traded oil fell 22 per cent in November.Mohammed Hamad al-Rumhy, Oman’s oil and gas minister, said Wednesday of the production cut expected at Thursday’s meeting that “we haven’t discussed the numbers.”U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted Wednesday that “Hopefully OPEC will be keeping oil flows as is, not restricted. The World does not want to see, or need, higher oil prices!”The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Fort St John receives 1012 cm of snow as of Friday afternoon

first_imgAccording to Sekhon, we are expected to receive an additional 5-10 cm overnight with the snowfall ending Saturday afternoon.An extreme cold warning is currently in effect for the North Peace. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Environment Canada has released the amount of snow Fort St. John and the B.C. Peace has received so far.Bobby Sekhon, Meteorologist with Environment Canada, says our area has received 10-12 cm of snow as of Friday afternoon.“We’ve had, obviously, some snowfall with the system that is moving through right now. It looks like about 10-12 cm of snow in the B.C. Peace and still some more to come into this afternoon and tonight.”last_img read more

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Grande Prairie RCMP seek publics assistance in locating missing youth

first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – Grande Prairie RCMP are asking for the public’s assistance in locating 15-year-old Dana Buckley.According to RCMP, Buckley was last seen in the Grande Prairie Area on July 21, 2019.Buckley is described as: Female5’4″Approximately 120 lbsLong brown hairRCMP say there is a concern for her well-being.Anyone with information on Buckley’s whereabouts is being asked to call the Grande Prairie RCMP at 780-830-5700 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.last_img

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Huawei says no legal case against Australia, for now

first_imgSydney: Chinese telecoms giant Huawei said Friday it had no immediate plans to mount a legal challenge over Australia’s decision to bar the company’s equipment from the 5G network Down Under. A day after taking Donald Trump’s administration to court for banning US federal agencies from buying Huawei products, the firm said no such move was envisaged in Australia. “Whilst we have our differences with the federal government, we would still rather work cooperatively,” a company spokesman told AFP. Also Read – Maruti cuts production for 8th straight month in Sep “A legal challenge is not a priority at this moment.” Australia in August announced guidelines on contracts to build fifth generation mobile networks in the country which effectively barred Huawei and another Chinese giant, ZTE, from the project. Canberra cited intelligence agency warnings against the “involvement of vendors who are likely to be subject to extrajudicial directions from a foreign government”. As Huawei has grown, fears have emerged that the company could effectively provide the Chinese state with a switch to cut critical infrastructure during a crisis. Also Read – Ensure strict implementation on ban of import of e-cigarettes: revenue to Customs While Huawei insists it is a private company, its founder Ren Zhengfei is a 74-year-old former People’s Liberation Army engineer. And while there are no formal ties with the state, in practice large Chinese firms and the ruling Communist Party are intricately interlinked. In 2015, Beijing passed a law obliging its corporations to aid the government on matters of national security. That, coupled with Beijing’s more muscular foreign and security policy overseas, has raised concerns among members of the Five Eyes intelligence sharing collective. All five members — Australia, Britain, Canada, New Zealand and the United States — have taken at least some steps toward limiting Huawei’s role in sensitive infrastructure. But at the same time, Huawei has become enmeshed in local economies. The company says its business in Australia alone is worth Aus dollars 650 million and has 700 employees, and its equipment is used directly or indirectly by half the population.last_img read more

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