Career focus: Yorkshire & the humberside

first_img Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. A region by region look at working in HR in the UK. This month we look atYorkshire & the humberside.  Editedby Ross Wigham e-mail: [email protected] of transformation blows across the NorthThe economy of Northern England has been in a period of change for severalyears and the region is a prime example of this transformation. The economy of Yorkshire and the Humber has consistently outstripped theEuropean growth average for the past five years and attracted significantforeign investment. Because of the cheaper costs associated with the region and a workforce of2.3 million, many large firms have moved north. The area’s10 universities and40 colleges now provide around 10 per cent of the UK’s graduates and theregional development fund has awarded £7.5m to skills development schemes. The latest Labour Force Survey shows that employment is stable in the regionat 71.4 per cent, up by 0.6 per cent in 12 months. The seasonally adjustedunemployment rate was down by 0.2 per cent to 5 per cent. The claimant countalso dropped. The survey reports that around 2.3 million people are employed inthe region and that there has been a rise in the number of self-employedpeople. Like other growth areas in the UK the region is pitching itself as aworld-class business location with cities such as Leeds, Sheffield and York atthe forefront of this investment drive. In the east of the region, Hull is one of the UK’s principle ports. One ofthe main areas of development within the local economy has been the growth ofthe service industries and retailing which now employ more people thanmanufacturing. Lesley Hayhurst, branch secretary of the South Yorkshire branch of theChartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD), which has around 2,000members, says: “There are a lot of organisations around the area and somegood opportunities for HR professionals. House prices are reasonable, andalthough there are plenty of towns and cities, you’re never too far away fromthe countryside.” Hayhurst said HR is a real growth area because a great deal of cultural workis being done as the region’s economy changes and develops. “There’s a real challenge around culture change and that presents someimportant roles for HR, and people coming into the profession.” Helen Thornton, chair of the 3,500 strong West Yorkshire branch of the CIPD,which includes Leeds, Bradford, Huddersfield and Dewsbury, reports major growthacross the area. “There are lots of financial institutions now based in the region andthat sector has been growing in the past few years,” she said. “Thepublic sector is another major employer, but the economy as a whole has a goodmix.” There is also support for HR professionals from the Northern AreaPartnership – an informal network of seven CIPD branches. Sarah Attwell works as an HR assistant for Gamestation in York and iscurrently studying for her CIPD qualification. She believes the area is a greatplace to start a career in the profession because it’s so central in the UKwith good transport links. “I think it depends on the company you work for to a certain extent. Inmy experience training and support is available,” she says. Living in the regionEducation: The Region in Figuresreport by the Office for National Statistics shows that the pupil/teacher ratiois slightly above the national average at primary schools on 22.7 (UK average22.0) and secondary schools 16.9 (average 16.4) The Local Education Authorityspend per pupil and average class sizes are also around the national average.Some 40.2 per cent of boys and 51.3 per cent of girls leave school with five ormore grade A-C GCSEs, and 29.2 per cent of boys and 36.6 per cent of girls passtwo or more A levels.Transport: The area is connected to London and Scotland via theEast Coast railway which has a major station at York. There are also largetrain stations at Leeds and Sheffield as well as an extensive local network.Leeds/Bradford airport serves the area, but has limited routes. The M62, the M1and a recent link to the A1 are the main roads.Culture/lifestyle: Yorkshire is traditionally known for it’sbeautiful countryside and friendly people, but a new image of the area isemerging. Traditional tourist hotspots such as York are now being complementedby the vibrant, modern cities of Leeds, Sheffield and Hull. Housing: According to figures from the Land Registry, theaverage price of a house in the region is around £108,876. The average detachedproperty is £188,925 while a flat or maisonette will cost about £98,519. Anaverage semi will be £101, 639. York, North Yorkshire and East Riding are themost expensive areas.Company profileFirst directStaff: 2,600Based: LeedsFirst Direct, part of the HSBC banking group, has been based inLeeds since 1989. Jane Hanson, the organisational development manager said thegroup was based in Leeds from its inception because the area offered severalkey benefits.”Initially, there was an available workforce and we neededthat because it was 24-hour opening with customers using the phone and theinternet.”We felt the people here were suitable for the challengeand research suggested that the [Yorkshire] accent was perceived as verytrustworthy,” she said.Hanson went on to explain that there were lots of young peoplein the area and two very good universities to recruit from. Leeds was also seenas an up-and-coming city with superb transport links to the rest of the country.Hanson moved to the area four years ago and admits thelifestyle had a big part to play in her decision. “It’s a really excitingcity and there have been lots of changes in the past few years. It’s probably abit of a clich‚, but people are much more friendly here. That really helps whenyou’re trying to build a culture within an organisation,” she says.Move here for…RamblingThe area has three National Parks and its famous countrysidehas featured in countless TV shows, such as Last of the Summer Wine andHeartbeatConferenceGet the best seats at the annual CIPD conference in HarrogateSweet stuffYork is home to one of the UK’s largest confectionery factoriesBut beware of…FootballIf Leeds United are relegated, as looks increasingly likely,then there will be no Yorkshire representation in the Premier League The Grit The legendary hard-nosed Yorkshireman might scare’soft’SouthernersLancashireEven mentioning the place could start a second War of the RosesHR contacts and local informationRegional development agency www.yorkshire-forward.comRegional Assembly www.rayh.gov.uk/index.cfmNorth Yorkshire CIPD http://branchwebs.cipd.co.uk/nyork/West Yorkshire CIPD http://branchwebs.cipd.co.uk/wyork/South Yorkshire CIPD http://branchwebs.cipd.co.uk/syork/Humber CIPD http://branchwebs.cipd.co.uk/humber/www.hrdirectorsclub.comwww.ytb.org.ukwww.yorkshirenet.co.uk Career focus: Yorkshire & the humbersideOn 17 Feb 2004 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Vermont House passes universal health care bill 89-47

first_imgScheuerman said while the state may not require participation in a single-payer plan, companies would likely be forced to pay into the plan. ‘There is a lot of uncertainty in this bill, and the angst is palpable for businesses in this state,’ Scheuerman said. ‘This is one piece of certainty if we take this off the table to say this would be one thing we wouldn’t do. At least take this off the table and don’t force companies to pay.’  by Anne Galloway vtdigger.org March 24, 2011You can call it Frank. You can call it Fred. But don’t call it a single-payer health care system. That was the message Representative Mark Larson, D-Burlington, delivered to lawmakers in the House Appropriations Committee last week and during the House floor debate on Vermont’s latest effort to reform its health care system. The euphemism single-payer was struck from the bill in an amendment to make the legislation more palatable to Republicans, sources say. The bill passed 89-47 after eight hours of debate, speeches, amendments and roll call votes. The legislation now goes to the state Senate.The actual, rather unsexy moniker? ‘A Road Map to a Universal and Unified Health System,’ or Green Mountain Care, for short.Larson said ‘fewer-payer’ would be more accurate. That’s because the state’s single payment system (in theory administered by a sole entity) will always have at least a few ‘payers.’ In addition to Green Mountain Care, other payers would include Medicare and Medicaid, large self-insured companies like IBM and supplemental insurance (likely for teachers and state and municipal employees who have ‘Cadillac’ plans).Whatever you call it, passage of H.202 pushes the state toward a single-payer health care reform construct, and the goals set out in the ‘road map’ are audacious: All Vermont residents would be eligible to receive an ‘essential’ health benefit package; health insurance companies would be effectively cut out of the game and relegated to a peripheral role in the new system; and cost containment measures would be designed to push the system toward fiscal sustainability. All this would be accomplished under an ambitious, three-year timeline.Though government-controlled health care payment systems are commonplace in most countries in the developed world, no other local or state government entity in the United States has come as close to implementing a universal health care system for all of its residents. Vermont would be the first state to achieve what has been impossible elsewhere ‘ including President Barack Obama’s much-compromised attempt to reform the national system ‘ if the state can negotiate the push and pull of special interests, namely single-payer activists and a host of medical professionals and facilities that stand to win or lose ‘ whatever is proposed.The Legislature has outlined a new ‘road map,’ but it isn’t the first time lawmakers have gone down a garden path toward the dream of creating a fully fledged universal coverage plan. Two previous health care reform efforts that achieved partial gains nudged Vermont closer to the goal. In 1992, Gov. Howard Dean and the Legislature launched the successful Dr. Dynasaur program, a Medicaid-subsidized health care plan for children under the age of 18 whose families financially qualify. Just five years ago, the Legislature and Gov. Jim Douglas enacted Catamount Health, a Medicaid-subsidized program for uninsured Vermonters. Despite this last effort to extend coverage to uninsured Vermonters, 47,000 residents are currently without health insurance, and 160,000 are underinsured and find it difficult to pay for health care costs as out-of-pocket expenses and deductibles rise.With H.202 and the Hsiao report in hand, the third time might be the charm. This go-round Governor Peter Shumlin, a Democrat, has made health care reform his signature initiative and his Democratic compatriots in the Statehouse are determined to make it so. The effort builds on the work of economist William Hsiao’s initial research for the design of a ‘single-payer’ health care system.Republicans opposed the bill because they say they can’t support sweeping reform without knowing how much the system will cost or who will pay for it.Hsiao proposed a 14.5 percent payroll tax, and also suggested that an income tax could also be an option. The House Health Care Committee decided the ‘details’ are beyond the Legislature’s purview for the time being. The board and a team of eight researchers from the Department of Banking, Insurance, Securities and Health Care Administration will devise the system; lawmakers will be responsible for approving a financing plan (2013), a budget (2014) and plans for implementation of the system (2012).If the legislation is enacted as is, (the Senate is taking testimony on the bill Thursday night), it will set a few parameters in place for the formation of the Green Mountain Care board and implementation of the health care exchanges under the federal Affordable Care Act. In addition, the bill sets the stage for Green Mountain Care, the single payment system. H.202 hands over the biggest decisions ‘ the benefit packages for consumers, reimbursement rates for doctors and hospitals and how the cost containment and payment reform systems will work ‘ over to the five-member professional board.Debate on the floorRep. Mark Larson, chair of the House Health Care Committee, introduced the bill and was subsequently queried by lawmakers for about 5 hours. Larson, D-Burlington, was unflappable. He didn’t lose his cool, even after about three hours of steady grilling from Rep. Tom Koch, D-Barre Town, who used an amendment proposed by Rep. Cynthia Brown, a Democrat, as an opportunity to flay open the underlying bill.Larson began with a preamble that explained the rationale for reform. ‘Our current system is broken; it’s too costly; and there is no mechanism for cost control,’ Larson said. The state is spending $4 billion a year on health care now; he said that total will likely grow by a third, or by $2 billion over the next two years. ‘We have a system that has demonstrated that despite all of our efforts cannot control the cost of health care,’ Larson said.The system, he said, is also unfair and inequitable. Constituents say the premiums they pay for health insurance are comparable to a tax, except that some people pay and others don’t, and yet everyone benefits.‘At a time where Vermonters are increasingly seeing the cost of copays going up and the amount of coverage going down, we can’t afford to spend money on things that don’t add value to our health care system,’ Larson said.The second amendment, proposed by Rep. Linda Waite-Simpson, D-Essex Town, passed on a voice vote. The amendment will require the state to hold a public hearing and an economic study regarding how Green Mountain Care would affect for self-insured employers, including IBM which is in Waite-Simpson’s hometown.Browning’s amendment would have confined H.202 to the formation of the board and the exchanges and would have stopped short of allowing the state to move forward with the laying the foundation for the single payment, universal Green Mountain Care plan.‘We need more detail,’ Browning said. ‘I don’t think we’re ready for this commitment. The other problem I have with it is the level of uncertainty it creates, which is the worst thing for economic activity and the worst thing for business.’Rep. Tom Koch used the amendment as an opportunity to conduct a courtroom-like cross-examination of Larson. With a laser-like focus, Koch methodically deconstructed the 92-page bill section by section, raising questions about how the plan would affect self-insured employers; how the bill would contain costs under a per capita reimbursement system; whether the system would limit care to patients in order to contain costs; how the plan would monitor health care quality and whether the legislation would provide adequate reinsurance in the event of catastrophic medical claims.‘Is not one of problems with capitated payments is the economic incentive for providers to do less for patients?’ Koch interrogated.Larson replied: ‘That’s true if you don’t monitor the quality.’ He said Green Mountain Care would include safeguards to prevent providers from underserving people under capitated payment system.Koch also pointed out a sole reference to ‘single-payer’ and then proceeded to use a Gertrude Stein style a rose is a rose is a rose line of questioning to highlight what was already spelled out in the legislation ‘ that is, passage of H.202 means that most Vermonters, not already covered by Medicare or a large self-insured employer, would, in 2014, shift toward one health care administration system. He pointed out that the objective of the bill is to eliminate insurance competition.Koch and other Republicans also argued that including self-insured companies in the Green Mountain Care system would be unconstitutional; Larson said the state would not seek an ERISA waiver, and said such waivers are not possible to obtain. Businesses, he said, would continue to function as they do now.Nevertheless, an amendment from Rep. Heidi Scheuerman, R-Stowe, and Rep. Oliver Olsen, R-Jamaica, proposed that the state exclude self-insured companies from the Green Mountain Care system.Scheuerman said under the proposal, self-insured companies would pay double ‘ they would pay insurance premiums and potentially a payroll tax, as suggested by Hsiao’s report. Scheuerman said a number of large, self-insured companies could be affected, and she rattled off a list: GW Plastics, General Electric, General Dynamics, Pizagalli Construction, Plasan, King Arthur Flour, Cabot Creamery, CVPS, among others. Anne Galloway is editor of vtdigger.orglast_img read more

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Bernhard Schulte, MidOcean Wind Set Up US Offshore Wind Joint Venture

first_imgBernhard Schulte Offshore (BSO) and MidOcean Wind (MOW) have entered into a joint venture to build and operate support vessels for the U.S. offshore wind industry.According to the parties, the Connecticut-based joint venture signals a new chapter of cooperation which began in late 2018 when BSO and MOW partnered in WINDEA Offshore US to provide a single point of contact for offshore wind customers in the U.S.Within the joint venture, BSO and MOW also intend to explore opportunities in other sectors of U.S. merchant shipping.“Wind farm owners and turbine manufacturers will be able to reduce their risks by working with our team,” said Bradley Neuberth, Vice President at MOW.“MidOcean will ensure the vessels will be Jones Act compliant and delivered as agreed. Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement as the operator of the ships will bring the learnings of the European wind farm projects into the U.S. market. We have been working closely with the Schulte Group for more than a year and the time is right to formalise our partnership on offshore wind vessels.”last_img read more

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QPR ‘tried to hijack Murphy’s move to Blackburn’

first_imgQPR made a late attempt to hijack Danny Murphy’s move to Blackburn, according to The Lancashire Telegraph.It is claimed that Rangers chairman Tony Fernandes sanctioned a last-minute improved offer to the 35-year-old, who is leaving Fulham on a Bosman free transfer.Rovers’ new supremo Shebby Singh is said to have responded in kind to complete the deal.Murphy is believed to have agreed a two-year contract at Ewood Park.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

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Big events to bet on over the summer

first_imgEmbed from Getty ImagesThe summer isn’t a time to relax if you are a sports lover. The main football leagues may have ended but the coming months are packed with top sporting events to not just enjoy watching, but also try to get some good wins when placing bets on them.This blog will give you a taster of the top sporting events to place bets on this summer. Of course you will need to find somewhere to be placing all these wagers It’s a great idea to check out https://footballjunkie.co.uk/best-betting-sites/ where there will be plenty of markets with highly competitive odds to look at. So, let’s look at the top events that are on their way.Women’s World CupAfter the excitement and betting mania of last year’s Men’s World Cup, it’s the turn of the women this year. The tournament is being held in France with the final taking place on July 7 and there’s plenty of British interest with both England and Scotland taking part.Embed from Getty Images2019 Cricket World CupIt may be a one-day tournament, but the 2019 Cricket World Cup runs until July 14. The top cricketing nations in the world are all taking part and each game has a whole stack of markets to hopefully make some profits from.Formula 1The 2019 F1 season has been dominated by Mercedes but can they continue their supremacy during the summer? June, July and August will see some key races being run including the British Grand Prix on July 14 (the same day as the Wimbledon Men’s Singles final). Copa AmericaThis is the main men’s football tournament taking place this summer. The top South American countries and some invited guests are battling it out between June 14 and July 7. Chile will be bidding to win the tournament for the third time in a row.Open GolfIt’s already been a thrilling year on the golf calendar with the triumph of Tiger Woods at the Masters. There are two Majors left to be played this year starting off with the US Open from June 13-16 and The Open Championship from July 18-21. Betting opportunities galore as Brooks Koepka looks to continue his excellent form.WimbledonJuly gets off to an excellent start with the Wimbledon Tennis Championships taking place from July 1-14. This is the top tennis tournament in the world and the one all players want to win. There will be betting opportunities galore for this tournament with not just the singles competitions to try and get winners on but the doubles too. With all the top players involved, it’s a betting feast you won’t want to miss out on.The AshesAll the excitement of the 2019 Cricket World Cup is for many cricket fans just the starters. Once the world champions have been crowned in July, the five-test Ashes series between England and Australia begins on August 1. England will be bidding to regain the Ashes and there’ll be market after markets available at the top betting sites. Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebookby Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksRecommended for youAspireAbove.comRemember Pauley Perrette? Try Not To Smile When You See Her NowAspireAbove.comUndoLifestly.com25 Celebs You Didn’t Realize Are Gay – No. 8 Will Surprise WomenLifestly.comUndoUsed Cars | Search AdsUsed Cars in Tuen Mun Might Be Cheaper Than You ThinkUsed Cars | Search AdsUndoTopCars15 Ugliest Cars Ever MadeTopCarsUndoezzin.com20 Breathtaking Places to See Before You Dieezzin.comUndoFood World Magazine15 Fruits that Burn Fat Like CrazyFood World MagazineUndoHappyTricks.comHer House Always Smells Amazing – Try her Unique Trick!HappyTricks.comUndoDrhealth35 Foods That Should Never Be Placed in the RefrigeratorDrhealthUndolast_img read more

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Which 1-win wonder spies No. 1 pick: 49ers, Raiders, Cards, Giants?

first_imgIt’s here. The three-game stretch that can uplift the 49ers. It won’t save their season. But it must be a wonderful sight to see fellow one-win wonders ahead of the Nov.18 bye.Sunday’s game between the 49ers (1-6) and host Arizona Cardinals (1-6) pits the longest shots to make the Super Bowl at 500-to-1, per Bovada’s online sportsbook. After that, the 49ers host the Raiders (1-5) on Thursday night, Nov. 1, then the New York Giants (1-6) on Monday night, Nov. 12.C.J. Beathard of the San …last_img read more

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Pay More Taxes

first_imgOver the last couple of days a number of people have shared with me their feelings about the outcome of the Presidential election.They’ve said things like, “The government punishes business so much, there isn’t going to be any reason to put forth the effort.” I’ve heard, “Why should I work so hard when the government is going to make me pay more and more taxes?”Here’s my favorite: “Forty-seven percent of the people aren’t even going to try. They’re just going live on government handouts.”You personal economy has nothing to do with outcome of the Presidential election. That isn’t how successful people look at these issues.The Truth (For Those That Will Heed the Call)Pay the highest tax rate you possibly can.Succeed so wildly in all of your business endeavors that you find yourself in a tax bracket that makes you crazy uncomfortable. Give to Caesar what is Caesar’s, but keep the rest for yourself. Make sure that remainder is enough that you make your life the best life possible.Now let’s deal with the forty-seven percent. Let’s say forty-seven percent of the population isn’t going to try to succeed. It’s sad. But for our purposes it means that half of the people with the skill, talents, and abilities—but lacking the ambition—aren’t going be competing with you (not that I believe that number is anything close to accurate).Unless you are in politics, there isn’t much you can do about the outcome of any election. What you can do something about is your mindset and the level of success you achieve. Go ahead and succeed, and pay more taxes. Get the Free eBook! Want to master cold calling? Download my free eBook! Many would have you believe that cold calling is dead, but the successful have no fear of the phone; they use it to outproduce their competitors. Download Nowlast_img read more

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Indian tennis scene seems perched at an uncomfortable crossroad

first_img(From left) Chiradeep Mukherjea, Vijay Amritraj, Royappa and Kamesh Krishnan: tired actors in a tragic farceThere was, in a sense, a certain amount of symbolism in Chiradeep Mukherjea’s facile win over Australian Brian Benson in last fortnight’s Indian Open Satellite Tennis Tournament at Calcutta’s South Club. The comparatively unattractive prize,(From left) Chiradeep Mukherjea, Vijay Amritraj, Royappa and Kamesh Krishnan: tired actors in a tragic farceThere was, in a sense, a certain amount of symbolism in Chiradeep Mukherjea’s facile win over Australian Brian Benson in last fortnight’s Indian Open Satellite Tennis Tournament at Calcutta’s South Club. The comparatively unattractive prize money – Benson received Rs 3,325 as runner-up – and the glaring absence of any players of international repute has reduced the Indian tennis circuit to a tragic farce. This year, with the Indian Open having been scrapped and major tennis tournaments pruned down to a mere 17, the Indian tennis scene seems perched at an uncomfortable crossroad. Firstly the biggest foreign name the All India Lawn Tennis Association (AILTA) had was Benson and the two Americans, Rich Flach and Scott Kidd-all three virtual unknowns on the international tennis scene. The additional fact that the Satellite Tournament, which is considered a stepping stone to the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) Volvo and Grand Prix tournaments, has Nandan Bal as top seed, is a dismal commentary on the status that the Indian circuit has earned over the years.At one time, it was possible for Indian tennis fans to bask in the reflected glory of Nastase, Thomas Koch, Tom Gorman, Raul Ramirez and of course the Amritraj brothers. But that is history. And the rot has started seeping down to the Amritrajs of tomorrow. “The circuit is getting stale,” says Balram Singh, a circuit veteran, “you don’t enjoy tennis anymore and neither do top players like Vijay, Anand, Shashi (Menon) bother to participate. That means that none of the top class foreigners are interested either.”Poor Organisation: But much of the griping from Indian circuit hopefuls is directed at the AILTA and the organisational hassles that make playing in the Indian circuit a frustrating experience. And, in the long run, scotches any talent that may be available. “The way Indian tennis is run is a disgrace,” storms Shyam Minotra, former Davis Cupper and the secretary’ of the recently-resurrected Tennis Players’ Association of India. “It has become routine to be elected and re-elected as the office bearers of the AILTA thus maintaining a never-ending monopoly.”Certainly, a close look at the organisational aspect of the Indian tennis circuit indicates why veteran has-beens like Jaideep Mukherjea and Premjit Lall are still winning tournaments, while no youngster worth the name (with the possible exception of Shankar Krishnan) has made any waves. For instance, none of the players is provided with the train fare, as was the case earlier. They are crammed together in spartan dormitories and paid an astonishing sum of Rs 15 a day for meals, AILTA spokesmen defend their penny-pinching by pointing out that the tournaments carry prize money. But how much? The prize money starts only when a player reaches the quarter finals and is a paltry Rs 200-250 for a majority of the tournaments. The total prize money is around Rs 20,000 and the bulk of the gate money and advertising revenue goes to the organisers.Few Opportunities: The result is that not many players complete the circuit since their money is exhausted by the time they are halfway through. Most of them come from middle class families and have a limited budget. Consequently, the entries for the later tournaments are sparse and the opportunities for spotting new talent greatly reduced. Argues Chiradeep Mukherjea: “There should be separate men’s, women’s and junior tournaments, with the juniors being given free board and lodging instead of prize money.”Another deterrent is the haphazard way in which the tournaments skip from one part of the country to another and back again, draining the mental and financial reserves of most of the players. In the 1978-79 circuit, players found themselves in Madras one week, then in Cuttack, Gauhati, Allahabad and Meerut. Says Narendra Singh who was in the committee that finalised the dates of the 1978-79 circuit: “One cannot help such things. Halfway through the tournament, a quarter of the centres have cried off due to finances, calamities or non-availability of top players. In which case, last minute adjustments have to be made.”But the AILTA seems determined to avoid what is the most obvious remedy. Increase the prize money and give free board and lodging till the end of the tournament. Even an improvement in the lodging facilities would be some sort of incentive if instead of 10 or 12 players sharing a dormit- ory, decent double rooms were provided. Says Royappa, a former Indian number one and a player on the international circuit: “Instead of one tournament a week, we should have at least two or three in different centres. This would lessen the load of entries on the organisers in the initial tournaments and would reduce the muddle that exists now.” But that is wishful thinking. The AILTA, which claims to be organising itself on ATP lines, seems quite content to let sleeping dogs lie. But it is a direct result of their attitude that led to India’s disgraceful performance in the Eastern Zone Davis Cup last year when the team lost to lowly North Korea. It was indicative of the huge gap between players of the calibre of Vijay Amritraj and Ramanathan Krishnan and the current crop of players who are stagnating through no real fault of their own or lack of adequate talent, but because of the peculiar attitude of the powers-that-be.advertisementadvertisementlast_img read more

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10 months agoNewcastle inviting offers for Rob Elliot

first_imgNewcastle inviting offers for Rob Elliotby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveNewcastle United are inviting offers for Rob Elliot.Rafael Benitez confirmed that Newcastle keeper Rob Elliot will be available during the transfer window with Martin Dubravka, Freddie Woodman and Karl Darlow currently ahead of him in the pecking order.Asked if Darlow could be sold amid speculation linking him with Sky Bet Championship promotion-chasers Leeds, he replied: “I know some of our players, the agents are telling us this club is interested or another one, but we are not ready at the moment to sell anyone.“The only one that now is available in the window is Elliot because the others, at the moment we need them.“Obviously, we have too many keepers and we have to manage, but Rob is available in the window.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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9 months agoAinsley Maitland-Niles: My ideal position at Arsenal…

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Ainsley Maitland-Niles: My ideal position at Arsenal…by Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAinsley Maitland-Niles sees his future at Arsenal on the wing.The Gunners and England have high hopes for Three Lions’ U21 prospect.”I’d like to be a winger,” Maitland-Niles told Sky Sports. “I feel comfortable there and I’ve been playing there this season.”I was a striker growing up. Thierry Henry was the perfect role model at the time.”Then everybody started growing but I was still a bit short. As I was still quick, direct and could run at players they thought they would put me on the wing. So up until the age of 16 I was a winger.” last_img read more

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