Pensioner slapped with assault charge

first_imgA pensioner was on Wednesday slapped with an assault charge when he appeared at the Vreed-en-Hoop Magistrate’s Court before Magistrate Christel Lambert.Joel Harper, 69, of Lot 7 Zeelugt, East Bank Essequibo (EBE), pleaded not guilty to the offence, which he allegedly committed on May 28, 2016 at Tuschen, EBE when he assaulted Norman Duke with intent to cause bodily harm.The prosecution is contending that on the day in question, the Virtual Complainant (VC) was riding a bicycle when he struck the defendant causing him to fall. Upon getting up from the road, the defendant took up a piece of wood and dealt the VC multiple lashes.As a result, the VC had to be rushed to the West Demerara Regional Hospital where he was treated and sent away.The matter was reported to the Police Outpost at Tuschen and then to the Leonora Police Station.The defendant was later arrested and charged with the offence of assault.When given an opportunity to speak in Court, he explained that he was upset because the VC was careless. Magistrate Lambert explained to the defendant that his actions could not be justified, and ordered him to seek anger management counselling.He was granted bail in the sum of ,000. The case will continue on June 22.last_img read more

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Charrandas Persaud tells international media about threats to life

first_imgNo-confidence voteFormer Alliance For Change (AFC) Member of Parliament Charrandas Persaud, who has since been expelled from the party, has outlined the threats to his life after his “yes” vote in the National Assembly on December 21, 2018, toppled the David Granger-led Administration.In an interview with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), Persaud said he made the move because he believed the Government has not been focusing on developing the country or creating jobs.“I was not very calm,” Persaud is quoted by CBC as saying, adding “I was frozen.”“Persaud, who was expelled from his party over his vote, said he was terrified forCharrandas Persaudhis own safety because of Guyana’s history of political assassinations. Because of that, he said the only person he talked to about his intention was the man he asked to provide some security for him in the gallery in case he was “jumped”,” the CBC reported. “I cried all night [the night before the vote],” he told the CBC, adding that he thought he would die.The CBC reported that Persaud added that the feeling only got stronger after the vote when he said another MP told him he would be dead that night. “It was not an idle threat I entertained,” he was quoted as saying.“Persaud said he was even prepared to use his water carafe as a weapon should he be attacked. He said he was lucky nothing happened, adding that modern technology probably saved him.”“Thank God for the advent of cellphones. Too many people were watching internationally and locally,” he told CBC.Persaud added that he did not take any chances, and after the sitting, he went directly to the Canadian High Commission in Georgetown and the next morning, he flew to Barbados and then on to Toronto.According to the CBC, Persaud moved to Canada from Guyana in the late 1970s and studied at the University of Toronto, eventually getting his real estate licence. He returned to Guyana in 1999 to practise law and eventually got into politics.Guyana Times had reported in December 2018, that as Persaud broke ranks and delivered the proverbial nail in the A Partnership for National Unity/Alliance For Change (APNU/AFC) coffin, his life was threatened twice; he was hit by both colleagues flanking him as well as received many explicit comments within a five-minute period. This was all done while the National Assembly broadcast the sitting live on its website. The video is still up on the Parliament website showing clearly what transpired. Persaud received the hostile treatment from his colleagues after he voted his conscience and sided with the Opposition People’s Progressive Party’s motion of no-confidence against the Government, of which he was a part.During the final segment of the 03h:51m:04s video, during the second part of the debate, when Persaud delivered his first “yes”, all hell broke loose. He received the first punch on his left arm, at 03h:33m:04s in the video, from an APNU MP who insisted that Persaud “can’t vote against the Government” .This was followed by a series of expletives from the same MP and surprisingly, Persaud received another punch from another APNU MP.Then came the issuing of death threats to Persaud. If one listens to the video, one would find that at 03h:33m:04s and 03h:35m:35s, he receives the threats: “Charrandas you gon dead tonight” and “Charrandas you want dead tonight” respectively. It sounded as though the threats came from a female MP on the Government side of the benches.last_img read more

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Stock Dogs strut their stuff at Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale dog trials

first_imgRed Bluff >> The 2017 Red Bluff Bull & Gelding Sale held the Stock Dog trials Wednesday in preparation for the 39th Annual Red Bluff Stock Dog Sale to take place at 3:30 p.m. Friday at the Don Smith Pavilion at the Tehama District Fairground.The second day of working the stock dogs will be held inside the Pauline Davis Pavilion at 7 p.m. Thursday.There are five judges at the trials who are looking to see how well the dogs can keep the cattle together, said Adam Owens, Bull & Gelding Sale …last_img read more

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Three New Fossil Finds Challenge Evolution

first_imgThree fossil discoveries challenge evolutionary dogma, and the articles admit it.Turtle: Bone BedTurtle stasis:  A pile of Jurassic turtles turned up in China.  It’s another case of earlier animals displaying no evolution.  The “Huge Deposit of Jurassic Turtle Remains” (Science Daily) more than doubles the number of turtle fossils known from that time.  Some 1800 specimens were found all jammed together, stacked on top of one another in a “bone bed” said to be 160 million years old. Live Science says that some of the densest concentrations contain 36 turtles per square meter.The locale, now one of the world’s driest regions, has also yielded fossils of sharks, crocodiles, mammals and several dinosaur skeletons.  A local flood was invoked to explain the deposit: the turtles, waiting at a waterhole for the rains, died.  “Many of the turtles were already dead and their bodies rotting. When the water arrived, it came with a vengeance: a river of mud, washing the turtles and sediments along with it and dumping them in one place, as the paleontologists read the site and its layers of stone.”  In a separate piece, Live Science posted five photos of the bone bed.Wikipedia says that turtles are “believed to have existed” in the late Triassic (220 million years ago), but the only candidate transitional form in the fossil record is one that already had a backshell and an incomplete carapace, “similar to an early stage of turtle embryonic development” – i.e., pretty far along toward turtledom.  “Prior to this discovery, the earliest-known fossil turtles were terrestrial and had a complete shell, offering no clue to the evolution of this remarkable anatomical feature. By the late Jurassic, turtles had radiated widely, and their fossil history becomes easier to read.”Coelacanth: Living FossilCoelacanths again:  The bony-finned fish Coelacanth “has one of the longest lineages—400 million years—of any animal,” PhysOrg reported.  A new fossil turned up in Texas, dated 100 million years old, though members of the family extend back into the Devonian.  Because of its bony fins, it was long thought to be the closest fish to humans (echoed in the PhysOrg article).  It was also thought to have gone extinct 70 million years ago.  Reports of its rediscovery as a “living fossil” in 1938 are well known.  The fins are not used for anything like walking, though.The article points to the serious questions about evolution and geologic history, without doubting evolution itself:  “The discovery of living coelacanths in the Indian Ocean after being presumed extinct for 70 million years highlights one of the great mysteries of ocean life. Where were they all that time?”  Not wanting to leave evolution in doubt, the statement continued, “The new fossil from Texas is a step toward understanding this fascinating history.”  How big a step on how long a path was not delineated.  Note: the diversity of coelacanth species was much higher in the past, another contradiction to evolution.Priapulid: Living Fossil Wrongly ClassifiedShaking the tree of dogma:  Priapulids are penis-shaped worms from the Cambrian explosion that survive to the present in essentially unchanged form.  A study of the embryological development of these animals now “Shakes Evolutionary Tree” (Scientific American) and “Pokes holes in evolutionary dogma” (Nature News).  How?  It’s going to require a reclassification of categories at the root of Darwin’s tree unquestioned since 1908: the split between protostomes and deuterostomes.Contrary to assumptions by early evolutionists, priapulids are deuterostomes – the anus develops before the mouth as the embryo develops (humans and other vertebrates are deuterostomes).  Protostomes develop mouth-first.  “Just as molecular techniques have revealed data that triggered revisions in cell biology, techniques to sequence genes and observe their activity are now challenging long-standing evolutionary scenarios,” Scientific American‘s short article stated.  That’s because this worm is now having to move from proto- to deutero.  As Nature News explained, taxonomists have long classified animals based on their embryos, because small things in an embryo can produce big changes in adult.So how does this finding “poke holes in evolutionary dogma” and “shake the tree” of life?  The article continues,“Evolutionary biologists will need to rename the protostomes. To do that, “we need to rethink how our earliest ancestors developed,” says Andreas Hejnol, an evolutionary developmental biologist at the University of Bergen in Norway and lead author on the report.”…Now, using molecular techniques to analyse gene expression, Hejnol and his team have revealed that a primitive protostome, the priapulid Priapus caudatus, develops like a deuterostome. These ‘living fossils’ look nearly identical to their priapulid ancestors, which littered the ocean floor during the Cambrian period, when protostomes originated (see ‘Protostome outlier’). That their development does not follow the protostome pattern suggests that early protostomes might also have developed differently. The order of the origin of the mouth and anus is now uncertain.“Here is an animal that is the poster child for early protostomes, and it develops just like a deuterostome,” says Mark Martindale, a developmental biologist at the University of Hawaii in Honolulu. “We’ve been using the name protostome for 100 years, and now it’s clear that it doesn’t mean anything.”Taxonomists are going to have to come up with a new name, and evolutionists are going to have to come up with a new explanation.  In the last paragraph, Nature News probably didn’t intend to make evolution look this bad, but…Just as molecular techniques have revealed data that triggered revisions in cell biology, techniques to sequence genes and observe their activity are now challenging long-standing evolutionary scenarios. “At the turn of the twentieth century, embryologists drew what they saw. But their microscopes stunk and they didn’t know about genes,” Martindale says. “Now we’re finally able to look closer, and we’re finding that they’re often wrong. But if you think about the tools they had, maybe it’s more surprising that anything is right at all.”Creationists could grab that fumble and run with it.  This goes to show that gaffes did not first evolve in Joebidenus vicepresidentus.Can anyone find anything in these observations that contradicts creation?  (No).  Can everyone find lots of things in these articles that contradict evolution?  (Yes, yes, yes…..).   For more on “surprise effects,” see “How to Translate Darwinese” (3/06/2008).  For another surprising story of stasis, read about lampreys (10/20/2006), or search on “living fossils” in the search bar.  And no, we’re not going to repeat the turtles all the way down joke. (Visited 39 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Evolutionary Origin-of-Life Speculations Contradict Each Other

first_imgGood scientific approaches should converge on the truth.  In secular origin-of-life studies, theories run off in all directions, often crashing into one another.Crystal power:  Nature News entertained an idea that RNA found ways to work in ice crystals.  Researchers at Cambridge created an RNA enzyme that worked at freezing temperatures.  ” Ice could have aided the emergence of self-replication in the prebiotic chemical world,” they said.  New Scientist rejoiced at the prospect: “If you thought life evolved in bubbling hot springs, think again.”  But Jack Szostak threw a snowball: the created molecule cannot replicate itself.  “I’m afraid we still have a long way to go to get a self-replicating ribozyme.”Seed bombs, take 2:  PhysOrg re-introduced a formerly discredited idea: “A new look at the early solar system introduces an alternative to a long-taught, but largely discredited, theory that seeks to explain how biomolecules were once able to form inside of asteroids.”  Tweaking the parameters got it to work this time – but it only gets heat to the interior of the asteroid.  It doesn’t create biomolecules.  “We’re just at the beginning of this,” one of the researchers said. “It would be wrong to assert that we’ve solved this problem.”Coacervates, take 2:  Remember Oparin’s old coacervates in the 1920s?  They were theoretical bubbles in which the magic of life happened.  Dutch researchers publishing in PNAS revisited coacervation as the creation of “artificial cell-like environment in which the rate of mRNA production is increased significantly” – provided they don’t have to explain the origin of the complex molecular machines DNA polymerase and RNA polymerase.Bio-organizational predestination:  Against impossible odds, origin-of-life researchers in Rome got 83 molecular machines to self-assemble in fatbubbles, Live Science reported.  They don’t know how they did it.  “It may be that these particular molecules are suited to this kind of self-organisation because they are already highly evolved,” Andrew Bissette (U of Oxford) wrote, but it’s likely some investigator interference overruled nature.  “An important next step is to see if similar, but less complex, molecules are also capable of this feat.”  For now, though, they surmise that “self-assembly of molecular machines into simple cells may be an inevitable physical process.”  They didn’t say what the trapped machines did, or how they could ever get out, or how DNA arrived inside to code for these machines in a self-replicating system.Solve the problem by creating a new word:  “Did autocells lead to life?” Astrobiology Magazine asked.  It depends.  What’s an autocell?  It’s a new word that means autogenesis.  What’s autogenesis?  It’s the spontaneous creation of order, got it?  “Terrence Deacon, of the University of California Berkeley, outlined in a recent talk how this step could have taken place.”  Deacon danced around the problems of entropy, the nature of catalysts to fall apart in water, and the tendency for catalysts to “spill out” of their autocells.  Surprisingly, he pointed to the discredited Martian meteorite photo of a worm-like structure as a possible autocell.Crater bowls of primordial soup:  A paleontologist tosses out deep sea vents, RNA worlds, Mars and the other baggage as he “presents origin of life theory,” according to Science Daily.  Sankar Chatterjee  (Texas Tech) combines panspermia with crater pools, and finds his Eureka moment.  As asteroids pummeled the earth in the Late Heavy Bombardment, “the large craters left behind not only contained water and the basic chemical building blocks for life, but also became the perfect crucible to concentrate and cook these chemicals to create the first simple organisms.”  Sankar Chatterjee  (Texas Tech) is so proud of his model, he indulged in self-congratulation:This is bigger than finding any dinosaur,” Chatterjee said. “This is what we’ve all searched for – the Holy Grail of science.“He’s got it all worked out, with asteroids delivering not only the RNA and proteins, but the lipids as well, then presto: cells.  “The emergence of the first cells on the early Earth was the culmination of a long history of prior chemical, geological and cosmic processes.”  Astrobiology Magazine entertained this hypothesis with a picture of Chatterjee standing by other dinosaurs.Crater refugia:  Nearly simultaneously, Iain Gilmour from the UK proposed craters as “an abode for life.”  PhysOrg and Astrobiology Magazine entertained this idea without mentioning who got it first, Chatterjee or Gilmour.  But do pictures of crater lakes on the present lively earth really support the hypothesis?  It’s not really a hypothesis, either, but a suggestion: Gilmour proposed that “the heat generated from an asteroid impact could lead to a crater becoming a refuge for life, or even a potential birthplace for life’s origin.”Yer all wrong; it’s clay:  Start over.  Now Science Daily says, “Clay May Have Been Birthplace of Life On Earth, New Study Suggests.”  Cornell is behind this one.  “We propose that in early geological history clay hydrogel provided a confinement function for biomolecules and biochemical reactions,” their champion said in Science Daily.  Sounds familiar; isn’t this an old idea? (see Evolution News & Views).  It is indeed, and it flies in the face of their former Cornell colleague, Carl Sagan, who hypothesized that life began wet at deep sea vents.  This article is accompanied by a picture of cracked, dry clay in a dried-up lakebed.  Sagan didn’t explain how the lucky molecules got concentrated; clay can do it.  If you can concentrate the building blocks of life, living cells with molecular machines must not be far behind.  The London Daily Mail found Adam and Eve in this story somehow:Was the Bible RIGHT about the origins of life? Scientists believe that we may have had our beginnings in CLAY. The Bible, the Koran and even Greek mythology has suggested for thousands of years that life began as earth, dust or clayNew theory is that clay is a breeding ground for chemicals which it ‘absorbs like a sponge’ and eventually leads to proteins and DNA forming One little problem remains: “How these biological machines evolved remains to be explained,” the Science Daily article points out.RNA World not dead yet:  In Science Daily, researchers at the University of Chicago noted that RNA makes up a significant part of the spliceosome, a molecular machine that splices DNA fragments into messenger RNA transcripts.  Looking beyond this observation, they divined a distant echo of a long lost RNA World.Isn’t it wonderful to see so many ideas percolating in the origin-of-life field?  Doesn’t this illustrate an active, progressing science?No.These ideas are mutually exclusive and incompatible.  They essentially falsify each other.  The “building blocks of life” can’t be cold and hot at the same time.  They can’t be at deep sea vents and in asteroids at the same time.  They can’t be dry and wet at the same time.  The metabolism-first and genetics-first scenarios are mutually incompatible and impossible anyway.  Rather than illustrating a field converging on answers, these contradictions reveal a paradigm in crisis.  Out of desperation, evolutionists are tossing around silly notions that cannot possibly work, individually or in combination.  The ideas are not percolating; they are fermenting, putting the origin-of-life (OOL) Dar-winos into a drunken stupor.What are we expected to believe?  That an asteroid dug out a lava-hot crater, which later filled with rainwater, while some delicate RNA molecules cooking at a deep sea vent launched into the crater by unknown lucky happenstance?  That the RNA became trapped with amino acids and lipids left over from the impact, emerging as molecular machines inside fatbubbles?  Whoops, we forgot that ribose can’t get wet, so it must have gotten launched from Martian deserts (9/07/13) into the crater when it was drying up into cracked flakes of clay. Uh-oh; the fatbubbles are death traps (9/03/04).  The molecules (even if they are all homochiral) will decay and perish inside.  They must have all self-organized so that they could work before entropy set in.The improbabilities at each step quickly multiply into impossibilities when combined into any kind of sequence.  Unless one believes in some kind of mystical secular predestination, this is nuts.  It’s not going to happen in quintillions of universes of habitable planets.  But that’s only the beginning of their worries.None of the above proposals answer the question: where did biological information come from?  Each OOL charlatan dodges that all-important question with misdirection, chanting “Abracadabra” with mythical “building blocks of life” as if Scrabble letters will self-organize into a dictionary.  Remember, even if “natural selection” could preserve progress (it cannot), they can’t use the Darwin magic wand until they have a highly accurate self-replicating system.  That’s not going to happen with a one-off lucky ribozyme in the best of RNA-world scenarios.  All the ingredients for a genetic code, and the machinery to read and translate it, encased in a cell with active transport, have to be present and working together from the beginning.In 12 years of reporting this stuff, no progress has been made.  In fact, the OOL field is regressing.  Now, they are reaching back to revive old notions that were long ago debunked, trying to do CPR on mummies.  Desperate to leap ahead into Charlie’s world of tree-thinking, they have to get past this obstacle, but it is a hurdle too high on their secular track, light-years high, light-years wide, and light-years thick.  Even that is an understatement (see our online book).We repeat our contention that that secular origin-of-life scenarios, with all their wish-fulfillment dreams and hopes, are the building blocks of lie – typo intended.(Visited 71 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Bailout bill leaves a one-year gap, with no available tax credits for work performed in 2008

first_imgNew Tax Credits For Residential Energy Improvements Will Be Available for 2009 WorkWASHINGTON, DC — The $700 billion bank bailout bill signed into law by President Bush in October 2008 included a renewal of the homeowner energy-efficiency tax credits originally established in August 2005. (These tax credits were available to homeowners who performed air-sealing work, installed Energy Star windows, installed insulation, or bought an efficient furnace or air conditioner in 2006 and 2007.) While the new bill reinstates tax credits for work performed in 2009, it leaves a one-year gap, with no available tax credits for work performed in 2008. “Congress really left a doughnut hole with this kind of language,” commented Steven Nadel, the executive director of the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy. “The package was getting too expensive, so they were trying to find out ways to cut the cost.” Tyson Slocum, director of the energy program at Public Citizen, a nonprofit advocacy group, was more blunt. “While Congress was opening up the federal checkbook to provide up to a trillion dollars to Wall Street, they were extremely militant about keeping the cost down of tax breaks for households,” said Slocum. For work performed in 2009, however, homeowners can receive the following tax credits:Up to $150 for a new efficient furnace.Up to $500 for 10% of the cost of air-sealing materials, new insulation, new exterior doors, or new reflective roofing.Up to $300 for a new efficient central air conditioner, heat pump, water heater, or certain biomass stoves.Up to $200 for 10% of the cost of new Energy Star windows.The maximum tax credit per household is $500. For more information, visit www.ase.org/taxcredits. ANALYSISFor those who care about energy efficiency, the federal tax credit program looks like a very blunt instrument indeed. The program shows all the signs of having been drafted by manufacturers’ lobbyists, not energy experts. Why else is a credit provided for window replacement, a measure that is almost never cost-effective? The window replacement tax credit will do more to line the pockets of window manufacturers than participating homeowners. A truly effective program would provide tax credits for home energy audits and air-sealing work; but since the cost of these measures is mostly labor, they are excluded from the tax-credit program, which covers material costs only. (Bizarrely, a taxpayer can claim a credit for 10% of the cost of any tubes of caulk used to perform air-sealing work, but can’t claim a credit for the cost of the labor to find air leaks — an absurd provision that appears to be propelled by the needs of caulk manufacturers, not logic.)last_img read more

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Australia proves fertile talent pool for NBA

first_img“It definitely gives you something to aim for, knowing that they have started where you started and they made it all the way to the top,” Austin Bradtke told AFP after a narrow win at a recent basketball carnival in suburban Melbourne.“Experiencing American basketball, and also the crowds and stuff, it looks really enticing for a young player, that is where I am keen to go,” added the 17-year-old, whose father Mark was among the earliest Australians to play in the NBA.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutOnce a far-flung dream for young hopefuls, technology is giving scouts greater access to international talent, while an elite junior program is putting promising Australians at the forefront of the game, with courts Down Under proving fertile ground for US recruiters.Australia’s national side “the Boomers” were earlier this month crowned FIBA Asia Cup champions despite fielding a second-string side because their top international stars were unavailable. UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension “When they have guys that are prepared to sacrifice for their teammates and put their team above the individual… I think that attracts all the NBA teams to look to those characteristics,” said Andrew Gaze, one of the first Australians to play in the US college system.“It is great for our national team and it provides tremendous inspiration for the youngsters coming through, who know that if you play basketball in Australia, there is clearly a pathway you can end up as an NBA player.”The 1990s were a golden era for Australian basketball, with a handful of trailblazers, including Gaze (Washington Bullets and San Antonio Spurs), Bradtke (Philadelphia 76ers) and Luc Longley, who won three championships with the Chicago Bulls alongside Michael Jordan, playing in the NBA.The Boomers reached the Atlanta Olympic semi-finals in 1996 before losing a memorable encounter to the USA “Dream Team” and took fourth-place at Sydney four years later.Standards during this period were also bolstered by US talent looking for game time elsewhere, said Marty Clarke, associate head coach with Saint Mary’s College in California, where Australians Mills and Milwaukee Bucks’ guard Matthew Dellavedova graduated.Strong at the grassroots“Partly because of the influence of the USA, with import players going overseas and the coaches going to coach elsewhere, the distance between the USA and the rest of the world certainly shrunk,” said Clarke, also a former Boomers assistant coach.While Australia’s National Basketball League (NBL) struggled after the turn of the century as attendances dwindled, grassroots participation remained strong, producing a new generation of talent.“Whereas people (once) played another sport and made a transition to basketball, these kids have been around these big stadiums since they were babies,” Clarke added.Exum, Simmons, and Jonah Bolden, who was recently drafted to the Philadelphia 76ers, are all sons of former NBL imports. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesses Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC A record eight Aussies (excluding Maker who was listed as South Sudanese) were listed on NBA rosters at the start of last season and hundreds of young men and women are now competing in the US college system, with many progressing to professional careers internationally.While no basketball nation can match the athleticism of the US, coaches say Australians have earned a reputation for selflessness and being team players.“I know that when we take kids to tours in America, the main thing that we struggle with is defending those super-athletic kids.“But then down the other end (Americans) struggle to defend our structure and our skill, and our decision-making,” said Melbourne Tigers coaching director Nick Abdicevic.Australia’s golden eraADVERTISEMENT Argentina, Uruguay collide in South America qualifierscenter_img (FILES) This file picture taken on August 21, 2016 shows Australia’s Matthew Dellavedova (2nd L) going to the basket during their men’s bronze medal basketball game against Spain during the Rio 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. AFP PHOTO / Andrej ISAKOVIC / TO GO WITH Basket-AUS-USA-NBA, FOCUS by Daniel DE CARTERETIf you ask Australian youngsters who their favorite basketball player is, US superstars such as LeBron James or Kevin Durant are likely responses, with the mere mention of the NBA creating a buzz.But home-grown talent Ben Simmons (Philadelphia 76ers), Patty Mills (San Antonio Spurs), Dante Exum (Utah Jazz) and South Sudanese refugee Thon Maker (Milwaukee Bucks) have swelled Aussie numbers in the world’s top league and heightened the hopes of young Australians playing the game.ADVERTISEMENT The elite training program in Australia’s capital Canberra can take much of the credit for producing the country’s top talent.“We have got this hidden gem sitting in Canberra,” said Basketball Australia chief Anthony Moore.The academy has been lauded for producing an NBA talent pool whose numbers compare with some of the top US colleges.Recognizing this, the NBA in June teamed up with Basketball Australia to launch the NBA Global Academy there.“(Australian players in the NBA) have all had a touch point at some part with the AIS (Australian Institute of Sport) basketball program, so that holds us all in really good stead, and that certainly has drawn the NBA to us,” Moore added. MOST READ LATEST STORIES WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Read Next Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

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As new PBA chief, Marcial vows to focus on improvements in officiating

first_imgTyphoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH 2 ‘newbie’ drug pushers fall in Lucena sting John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Willie Marcial. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netWillie Marcial, the longtime media bureau chief turned PBA commissioner, admitted that he was overwhelmed when he got the nod to lead Asia’s first pay-for-play league.But he vowed to try his earnest to fulfill his duties, starting by making sure the PBA Governors are on the same page anew following the PBA’s controversial chapter which led to the departure of former commissioner Chito Narvasa.ADVERTISEMENT View comments Chief Justice Peralta vows to lead by example, bares 10-point program PLAY LIST 02:02Chief Justice Peralta vows to lead by example, bares 10-point program01:37PNP vows dismissal for cadets in alleged hazing at PNPA00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City “For the Board, I hope we’ll all get along. If we won’t get a long, the PBA won’t work, so that’s what we want to do,” he said.The 56-year-old Marcial, who has served the league for more than three decades before his appointment, still couldn’t believe that the Board entrusted him such a huge responsibility.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“I really thank the Board because it’s a huge honor that I never expected. A lot of people have wanted to get this job, but it fell on us. As hard as we tried to evade the job, it still ended up on us. So maybe, it’s God’s will. We’ll just do our best,” he said.Marcial’s earlier moves as the league’s officer-in-charge to start the 43rd season has been greatly praised in the boardroom and has been much appreciated by the fans. Slow and steady hope for near-extinct Bangladesh tortoises Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasacenter_img Globe Business launches leading cloud-enabled and hardware-agnostic conferencing platform in PH MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC NCAA volleyball: Arellano thinks fatigue big factor in San Beda’s surprise collapse He formed a five-man committee to tackle transactions between teams, allowed more physicality to be observed during the games, and has also extended the basketball superstars to the streets by making surprise visit to the barangays with PBA Homecourt.In his first act as a commissioner, Marcial has also solidified the league’s support to Gilas Pilipinas as he convinced the Board of Governors to allow all players to be made available for national team duty moving forward.The cordial executive, however, knows that the work is just getting started as he seeks to further improve the style of play in the PBA and to bring the league back to the fans.“We’re focusing on implementing changes in officiating. We want our product to be more appealing and to draw the league closer to the fans,” Marcial said.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next NEXT BLOCK ASIA 2.0 introduces GURUS AWARDS to recognize and reward industry influencers LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

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a month agoOgbonna: West Ham players not about money and flash cars

first_imgOgbonna: West Ham players not about money and flash carsby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveWest Ham defender Angelo Ogbonna says there’s excitement amongst the players about what they can achieve this season.The calibre of the players themselves at West Ham has also gone up. New £50million striker Sebastian Haller has netted in each of the club’s last two Premier League wins.“We are blessed because we not only have good players but good people. Diop. Rice, Fredericks. Some players go out and they buy cars and spend money. These players are West Ham are humble with their feet on the ground.”Ogbonna is equally respectful of Monday’s hosts Aston Villa, despite defeats in three of their four League games so far.“It will be a tough game,” he told the Mirror. “A game for us to see how far we have come.” About the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Annie Lennox Gets Honorary Degree For Activism

first_imgInternationally-acclaimed singer/songwriter and human rights activist Annie Lennox was this week presented with an Honorary Degree by the University of Essex.Annie Lennox Awarded Honorary Degree by the University of EssexLennox received her Honorary Degree in recognition of her work in political and social activism and her extensive campaigning for humanitarian causes. She was presented with the honour by the University’s Chancellor Lord Phillips of Sudbury during a packed Graduation ceremony at the University’s Ivor Crewe Lecture Hall on Colchester Campus.“People ask me all the time, about HIV/AIDS,” Annie said during her speech. “They’ll say ’I’ve heard about the AIDS pandemic in Africa…but I don’t know what to do’. The answer is, of course, both simple and complex. You do what you’re drawn to do. And if you’re interested enough, you figure out what your contribution is going to be. You start by becoming aware, by being concerned, by breaking through your indifference, passivity, cynicism or intolerance. You transform. You become passionate..You become an activist.”During the ceremony, the University’s Dr Pam Cox spoke about Ms Lennox’s support for a wide-range of humanitarian projects which have made vital, practical, life-saving differences – above all in South Africa. Dr Cox also mentioned Ms Lennox’s ‘SING’ campaign which works with women and children with HIV – raising awareness regarding preventing the transmission of the virus from mother to child.After the ceremony Ms Lennox said: “The University of Essex has been recognised by both the Queen and Nelson Mandela for its involvement with the fight for human rights around the world, and I am delighted to receive this award in recognition of my work to raise awareness and funds for humanitarian causes and, in particular, for those affected by HIV and Aids. It is vital to work together to help people who need access to education, health care and justice.”Ms Lennox is one of seven distinguished individuals to receive Honorary Degrees at this year’s Graduation at Essex, which will see 2,745 students graduate ̶ the University’s biggest Graduation ever held.Also receiving an honorary degree today at the University of Essex was double Olympic gold medallist cyclist Laura Trott, in recognition of her significant achievements in European, World and Olympic cycling.last_img read more

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