Local and voluntary bar news

first_imgLocal and voluntary bar news Wilson to lead Orange County Bar Association Gen. Franks addresses Tampa leaders forum America’s armed forces will be in Afghanistan “as long as it takes,” U.S. Army Gen. Tommy Franks told a group of about 160 at a GrayHarris’ Community Leader Forum in Tampa in May.The war against terror won’t be over in the next six or 12 months, he added, because “there are ample people on this planet who hate us. The people of America will keep doing what it takes.”On September 11, “the United States of America looked evil straight in the face,” Franks said. “The flags went up, and we got quite serious. Now when they look at America, they see the face of resolve on our young people serving all over the world.”Through its Community Leader Forums, the firm brings together clients, attorneys and friends of the firm to hear high-profile business and community leaders and elected officials discuss issues of importance to the Tampa region.As commander in chief of U.S. Central Command, Franks is in charge of U.S. military operations for 25 nations in Africa, Central Asia, and the Middle East.In his opening remarks, Franks drew chuckles from the crowd as he spoke of his less-than-stellar academic efforts in college. But the talk turned to terrorism during the question-and-answer period.“We need to either kill Osama bin Laden and [Taliban leader] Mulah Mohammed Omar, or capture them. Either is fine with me,” he said. “There won’t be closure on September 11 until we get it done. It will help us in our hearts.”However, the general said, their capture or deaths aren’t what’s most important in America’s fight to protect the country against terrorism. “They’ve been marginalized,” he explained. “We’ve had lots of success so far, but there are lots of bad guys out there, and we need to get them.”Franks praised the efforts of America’s allies in the fight against terror. There may be an imbalance in training and access to technology, he said, but “that doesn’t mean they can’t work with us. There’s a way for these allies to be involved.” THE LEGAL AID SERVICE OF BROWARD COUNTY recently held an evening of awards and entertainment, “For the Public Good.” Achievement awards were bestowed to outstanding members of the Broward community for their commitment to social justice. Ruden, McClosky, Smith, Schuster and Russell, one of Broward’s largest and oldest law firms, was one of the recipients. Pictured is outgoing Bar President Terry Russell, center, accepting the award for the firm from honorary event chairs of the evening, David and Barbara Welch. JUDGE CAROLE TAYLOR of the Fourth District Court of Appeal in West Palm Beach, back left, and Assistant Public Defenders Eunice Baros, back center, and Peggy Natale, back right, recently spoke to Lisa Hanser’s social studies class at the Middle School for the Arts in West Palm Beach during Law Week. Members of Hanser’s class included Judge Taylor’s daughter, Claire Fluker, not pictured, and other seventh grade children, including Cara Baros, front left, and Sam Natale, front right. Discussion included the death penalty, Bill of Rights, Gideon v. Wainwright, and which civil liberties the students valued most. EMCEE OF THE LEGAL AID SOCIETY of Palm Beach County’s 14th Annaul Pro Bono Recognition Evening Bill Bone, from the left, and co-chairs Skip Smith and Haward Bergman belt out Guys and Dolls at the event which attracted 900 attendees and earned more than $177,000 for Legal Aid’s 16 projects. All funds generated by the evening — co-hosted by the Palm Beach County, South Palm Beach County, and Hispanic Bar associations — are used to provide free legal assistance to disadvantaged children, families, and elders residing in Palm Beach County. Honored at the event were Palm Beach County attorneys: Jayne Regester Barkdull (Community Service Award), Richard Bartmon (Appellate Law Award), Robert Bergin (Civil Litigation Award), Warren Brams (Child Advocacy Award), Steven Greenberg (Cultural Arts Award), John Kovarik (Family Law Award), Joseph Nusbaum (Juvenile Advocacy Law Award), Jack Orsley and Steven Cripps (Law Firm Award) and Kenneth Spillias (Employment Law Award). Entertainment was provided by students from the Dreyfoos School of the Arts, Olympic High School, and “celebrity attorney” performers. Rashkind to lead Miami FACL Paul M. Rashkind has been elected president of the Miami Chapter of the Florida Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers.Rashkind is the chief of appeals for the Federal Public Defender, Southern District of Florida. The association was founded in 1963 and is now in its fifth decade advancing the principles of liberty and justice in the criminal law.Also elected officers for 2002-03 are Vice President Kenneth Hassett of Coral Gables, Secretary William Thomas of Miami, and Treasurer Glenn Kritzer of Miami.The officers and board of directors were installed at the association’s 26th installation annual dinner dance in May. During the dinner, the association also honored Circuit Judge Ellen Leesfield, who received the “Hon. Gerald Kogan Judicial Distinction Award,” and attorney Albert Krieger, who was presented with the association’s Lifetime Achievement Award.The installation dinner also featured the granting of the association’s two annual law school scholarships. This year’s recipients are Kellee Knepper and Matthew Slater, both students at the University of Miami School of Law. THE AMERICAN CORPORATE COUNSEL ASSOCIATION recently held its annual Ethics Conference in Ft. Lauderdale, highlighted by a presentation moderated by Adele I. Stone, left, the former chair of The Florida Bar Professional Ethics Committee. Stone led more than 50 corporate counsel through various case scenaros highlighting numerous ethical concerns when representing corporate clients, including multijurisdictional practice issues. Panelists for the discussion included Professor Tim Chinaris of Appalachian School of Law, James Gale, Lisa Gefen, Luis Perez, and Frank Smith. The American Corporate Counsel Association/Global Corporate Counsel Association is the in-house bar association serving the professional needs of attorneys who practice in the legal departments of corporations and other private sector organizations worldwide. Pictured with Stone is James W. Patton, president of the ACCA South Florida Chapter. HENDERSON, FRANKLIN, STARNES & HOLT recently awarded $2,000 to Florida Gulf Coast University students as part of the first annual Emerging Artist Awards, a visual arts competition. The competition was open to all fine art students at the university. Pictured is Amy Bailey and her piece, “I’m not a Door Mat, I’m a Runner,” which was named “Best in Show.” Ninety-five pieces were selected to compete, and some of the works will be part of a traveling exhibit this summer and fall throughout performing arts halls in Southwest Florida. THE DADE COUNTY BAR YOUNG LAWYERS SECTION recently hosted Biscayne Elementary Students at the Richard E. Gerstein Justice Building. The approximately 50 sixth grade students went on a tour of the criminal courthouse and viewed Judge Peter Lopez’s morning criminal calendar. They had an opportunity to ask Judge Lopez questions including, but not limited to, everything from “Did you ever sentence someone to death?” to “Do you know Judge Judy?” The sixth graders were then escorted to one of the empty courtrooms where they were able to participate in a mock criminal trial. The students played the role of the judge, witnesses, prosecutors, defense attorneys, clerks, bailiff, jurors, and the defendant. This was an actual case that co-chair of the Schools Committee, Mark Eiglarsh, was actually involved with while serving as a prosecutor. Eiglarsh instructed the students about their constitutional rights, principals of law, and the structure of the criminal justice system. BETH LABASKY, a Tallahassee lobbyist and collector of antiques, recently donated a etched glass window featuring the seal of the Florida Supreme Court to the Supreme Court Historical Society. Labasky said she found the window for sale along a roadside in Havana, a small town northwest of Tallahassee. Turns out the window originally hung in the entrance of the building which served at the state’s Supreme Court from 1913 to 1949, and has since been torn down. The woman Labasky bought the window from said her husband was part of the demolition crew which tore the old Whitfield Building down and decided to save the window. Labasky displayed it in her home for years until moving recently and wasn’t sure what to do with the window at her new house. She then happened to see Dexter Douglass, a past president of the historical society, talking about the organization on TV and thought the time was right for the window to make its way home to the court. Also pictured is Russell Troutman, the current president of the Supreme Court Historical Society, accepting the donated window. RUSSELL E. CARLISLE, from the left, Anthony J. Karrat, Donald A. Wich, Jr., and Linda A. Conahan (not pictured) have been named co-chairs of Broward Lawyers Cares’ 2002-2003 Campaign to Recruit Pro Bono Attorneys. In its 20-year history, Broward Lawyers Care, the pro bono program of Legal Aid of Broward County, has provided its community with more than $10-million worth of donated legal services, raised more than $1 million in cash contributions, and helped nearly 13,000 people in need resolve legal issues. To learn more about the program, call (954) 765-8950. July 1, 2002 Regular News Brian Thomas Wilson was recently installed as president of the Orange County Bar Association for 2002-2003.Other new officers of the association include Paul L. SanGiovanni, president-elect; William E. Sublette, secretary; and Wayne L. Helsby, treasurer.The mission of the Orange County Bar Association is to “promote honor, dignity, truth, and professionalism within the legal community, to promote improvements in the law and aid in the administration of justice, to enhance the delivery of and access to quality legal services, to educate the public about the legal system, to provide for an inclusive bar and to promote camaraderie, a forum for discussion on issues pertaining to the legal system, and education for its members.”The Orange County Bar Association was established in 1933 and boasts more than 2,500 members.last_img read more

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IADC Young Author Award in Panama City

first_imgIADC Secretary General Rene Kolman and Jordy Boone, Image source: IADCThe International Association of Dredging Companies (IADC) said in its latest release that the next IADC Young Author Award will be presented on 10 May 2018 at the 34th PIANC World Congress 2018 in Panama City.According to IADC, they instituted this Young Author Award to stimulate the promotion of new ideas and encourage the young men or women in the dredging industry and its related fields.Each year at selected conferences, the IADC grants the award to the best paper written and presented by authors younger than 35 years of age. In each case, the Conference Paper Committee recommends a winner whose paper makes a significant contribution to the literature on dredging and related fields.The International Association of Dredging Companies bestowed the Young Authors Award to Jordy Boone, author of the winning paper “1DH Modeling of Transport and Sedimentation Inside a Hopper of a Trailing Suction Dredger”.The paper was presented during CEDA Dredging Days 2017 in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and is published as an article in the March 2018 issue of Terra et Aqua.last_img read more

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QPR ‘tried to hijack Murphy’s move to Blackburn’

first_imgQPR made a late attempt to hijack Danny Murphy’s move to Blackburn, according to The Lancashire Telegraph.It is claimed that Rangers chairman Tony Fernandes sanctioned a last-minute improved offer to the 35-year-old, who is leaving Fulham on a Bosman free transfer.Rovers’ new supremo Shebby Singh is said to have responded in kind to complete the deal.Murphy is believed to have agreed a two-year contract at Ewood Park.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img

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Warriors report: Draymond Green formally ruled out on trip

first_imgSubscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table bookATLANTA — Below are the takeaways from Warriors’ morning shootaround before Monday’s game against the Atlanta Hawks.1. Draymond Green won’t play on this trip.Despite expressing optimism earlier last week, Warriors coach Steve Kerr definitively decided otherwise on the chances Draymond Green will return from a right toe injury for any of the team’s remaining three road …last_img read more

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Are Biological Clocks Like Paley’s Watch?

first_imgWhat is a clock made of?  We think of springs, gears and moving parts made out of metal.  But a clock could, in theory, be designed with almost any material.  There are water clocks, sundials, and electromagnetic oscillators that all function to tell time.  What difference does it make if the parts are made of liquids, laser beams, or plastic?  What if a clock was made of biological material—would it be any less a device for keeping time?  Would it surprise you that such clocks exist in your body and in every living thing? In living things, biological clocks are given the name circadian systems.  They help organisms from bacteria to humans adjust to day-night (diurnal) cycles or other natural rhythms like seasons.  They control metabolic levels, feeding, reproduction and most other biological functions.  As scientists peer into the mechanisms behind circadian systems, they are finding remarkable similarities to man-made clocks.  One PhysOrg article was entitled, “Finding mechanism behind bacteria’s biological clock” – i.e., “how these biological clocks work at the level of biochemical mechanism.” Scientists at the University of California at Merced uncovered one clever mechanism: “One of the proteins, in the course of a 24-hour cycle, shifts from being squishy to hard and then back to squishy. The changes lead to all three proteins connecting and disconnecting.”  So it’s not just the connections proteins make with each other because of their shapes, but also their flexibility.  The article ended by saying these discoveries are changing the way researchers look at biological clocks.  “It’s now believed the proteins are more involved than previous [sic] thought.” PhysOrg also reported last month that scientists at Tel Aviv University are studying the biological clocks in zebrafish for clues to help humans.  A gene called Period2, “also present in humans,” responds to light and helps calibrate the clock.  It has a region called Light Responsive Model, they said.  “Within this region” (of the gene), they said, “there are short genetic sequences called Ebox, which mediate clock activity, and Dbox, which confer light-driven expression.”  The interplay between these sequences is responsible for synchronization of the circadian system.  Remarkably, “In these fish cells, the human LRM behaved in exactly the same way, activating Period2 when exposed to light — and unveiling a fascinating connection between humans and the two-inch-long fish,” even though, according to evolution, fish and mammals have been separated by many millions of years. Once we understand biological clocks in fish, we might learn how to fine-tune our own internal clocks.  Malfunctions in circadian systems in humans can cause depression, insomnia and other problems.  In Medical Xpress, a subheading reads, “Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have demonstrated that the circadian system, the body’s internal clock, regulates human platelet function and causes a peak in platelet activation corresponding to the known morning peak in adverse cardiovascular events.”  In another paper in Current Biology, scientists uncovered a protein called Nocturnin that regulates the biological clock in our gut.  Authors Gimbel and Floyd said, “What mechanisms control circadian rhythms in the gastrointestinal tract and how does this impact nutrient metabolism? The deadenylase and leucine zipper protein Nocturnin is now shown to play a central role.”  Studies like this can help us understand and correct for the effects of jet lag. Our health and sanity depend on our internal timepieces being properly calibrated. Bacteria have ways of synchronizing their clocks, too.  Science Daily reported on work at UC San Diego that used glowing proteins to let the scientists see how the cells do it.  The article used machine language to describe the mechanism: “Within each bacterium, the genetic machinery responsible for the biological clock oscillations was tied to green fluorescent protein, which caused the bacteria to periodically fluoresce.” Plants have biological clocks.  In Current Biology,1 a summary of a paper by Hubbard and Webb reads, “Plants are more sensitive to light in the day than at night due to the circadian clock. The protein that acts downstream from the clock to modulate blue light signalling in stomata comes as a surprise; it is FT, which is thought to be the long-distance regulator of flowering.” Like man-made machines, biological clocks apparently need to be oiled.  A commentary in PNAS was titled, “Dynamic fluctuations lubricate the circadian clock.”2  These are not random fluctuations, though.  Another PNAS paper described oscillators in the clocks: “Circadian transcriptional regulation by the posttranslational oscillator without de novo clock gene expression in Synechococcus.”3  The word oscillator brings to mind the mechanisms in the back of a pocket watch or the back-and-forth motion of a pendulum clock; except in the case of the bacterium, three circadian proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC oscillate in the levels of their expression, keeping time with the sun (see our entries from 9/15/2004, 5/17/2005, and especially 10/31/2008, where these proteins were described by scientists as having cogs and gears). Like man-made clocks, circadian clocks can tinkered with by humans.  An article on Science Daily was titled, “Manipulating Plants’ Circadian Clock May Make All-Season Crops Possible.”  Describing how a Yale team is identifying plants’ “morning genes” and “evening genes,” the article stated, “The circadian clock is the internal timekeeper found in almost all organisms that helps synchronize biological processes with day and night.” One environment where a clock would seem unnecessary would be in the perpetual darkness of a cave.  Remarkably, though, scientists detected circadian rhythms still partially functional in blind cave fish.  In PLoS Biology, Cavallari et al. discovered that the clock still worked, but was not calibrated by light, as with surface-living organisms.4  Science Daily and Live Science both commented on this unusual finding.  And in the same issue of PLoS Biology, Robin Mejia commented,5 Whether it’s a jay that starts its day at first light, an ice worm that burrows into a glacier when the sun comes out, or a bat that heads out to feed at dusk, virtually all animals follow a daily pattern of activity. While the need for this kind of pattern, called the circadian rhythm, is not fully understood, it is remarkably conserved across species, and disruptions to an animal’s circadian cycle produce stress. In 1804, in his book Natural Theology, William Paley famously made an inference to design from the idea of finding a watch on a heath, examining its parts, and observing that it functioned as a timepiece.  Critics of his design inference have focused on the differences between mechanical watches (which we can see being manufactured) and living organisms, which we cannot see being made.  Living things, furthermore, are able to reproduce themselves, indicating they have a history.  Actually, though, Paley’s design inference was based simply on the observation of seeing the watch function, whether or not he had ever seen a watch before or knew anything about who made it, how it was made, how it worked, or anything about its history. Even if he found a watch that could make copies of itself, the inference would stand – maybe even more so.  Now that we can see the actual parts of biological clocks functioning as oscillators, synchronizers and other devices common to the watches we know, Paley’s design inference seems stronger than ever. 1. Hubbard and Webb, “Circadian Rhythms: FLOWERING LOCUS T Extends Opening Hours,” Current Biology, Volume 21, Issue 16, R636-R638, 23 August 2011. 2. Commentary by Ming-Tao Pai and Charalampos Kalodimos, “Dynamic fluctuations lubricate the circadian clock,” PNAS, published online August 23, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1111105108. 3. Hosokawa et al., “Circadian transcriptional regulation by the posttranslational oscillator without de novo clock gene expression in Synechococcus,” PNAS, published online September 6, 2011, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1019612108. 4. Cavallari et al., “A Blind Circadian Clock in Cavefish Reveals that Opsins Mediate Peripheral Clock Photoreception,” PLoS Biology 9(9): e1001142. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001142. 5. Robin Mejia, “Cave-Dwelling Fish Provide Clues to the Circadian Cycle,” PLoS Biology 9(9): e1001141. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001141. Darwin was strongly influenced by Paley’s Watchmaker argument before he abandoned his Christian worldview.  His materialist disciples, eager to rid any Divine Artificer from science, buried Paley and said “Good riddance.”  It’s uncanny how times have changed.  The new Paleys are the leaders of the intelligent design community, who have given the argument from design new force and scholarship in works such as The Nature of Nature and Signature in the Cell.  But there’s nothing like actual clocks in living things to exhume William Paley, bring him back to life, and see him vindicated in the sequel, “Paley’s Revenge.”(Visited 35 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Showcasing SA’s hottest property

first_img27 January 2004Selling houses has traditionally been done via newspaper advertising and occasional shopping mall exhibits, mainly attracting distracted shoppers who have three bags of shopping, two kids and a husband in the car wanting to get back to the rugby. South Africa’s Hot Property Exhibition has changed all that.First launched last year in conjunction with Decorex SA, the Hot Property Exhibition comes to Durban (18 to 22 March), Cape Town (21 to 25 April) and Johannesburg (5 to 9 August) with a show featuring beach resorts, golf resorts, game farms, cottages, urban developments and more.“Hot Property Exhibitions are a national, independent property showcase which allows property developers to expose their products in one-on-one discussions with motivated, potential buyers”, says Peter Weaver, co-owner of Hot Property Exhibitons.“One of the biggest markets for South African property is international buyers”, says Weaver. “Hot Property Exhibitions attracts such buyers by providing a consolidated marketplace showcasing properties from all over SA at one venue.”According to Weaver, South Africa has “the best climate, incredible scenery, and quality property developments which are financially attractive by international standards”, making the exhibition a winning formula both for visitors and for participating property developers.Nearly 100% of 2003 exhibitors have rebooked for the Johannesburg show and are booking for Cape Town as well. “The reason”, says Weaver, “is buyers in Gauteng have an unprecedented opportunity to view all kinds of property at the show, from luxury golf estates to wine estate developments to mid-priced urban housing, from all around the country, under one roof.”Melanie Froneman of exhibition organisers South Africa RAI says Decorex and Hot Property Exhibitions is a perfect match. “Now, at one show, you can search for your perfect home and pick up on the latest decor, design and home lifestyle trends.“This method of selling properties is universally accepted as being the most pro-active, hard-selling vehicle available to property developers”, says Froneman. “It is amazing to me that there has never been a fully independent national property exhibition in this country.”Froneman says a measure of the mark the Hot Property Expo has already made is that international developers and agents from southern Europe have been attracted to the 2004 exhibition. Besides the foreign interest, all parts of South Africa are represented.Source: South Africa RAIlast_img read more

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9 months agoAinsley Maitland-Niles: My ideal position at Arsenal…

first_imgAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Ainsley Maitland-Niles: My ideal position at Arsenal…by Paul Vegas9 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveAinsley Maitland-Niles sees his future at Arsenal on the wing.The Gunners and England have high hopes for Three Lions’ U21 prospect.”I’d like to be a winger,” Maitland-Niles told Sky Sports. “I feel comfortable there and I’ve been playing there this season.”I was a striker growing up. Thierry Henry was the perfect role model at the time.”Then everybody started growing but I was still a bit short. As I was still quick, direct and could run at players they thought they would put me on the wing. So up until the age of 16 I was a winger.” last_img read more

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