Notre Dame student government in brief

first_imgGraduate Student Union The Graduate Student Union (GSU) has achieved several goals this semester, including changing its constitution, planning social events and coordinating a graduate research symposium, president Victoria Froude said. One of the group’s major achievements this year was passing the non-discrimination clause that was added to the GSU constitution, Froude said. Froude said the GSU has coordinated several social events. GSU is also planning its third annual Graduate Research Symposium, which will take place Feb. 4, Froude said. The group’s main goals involve improving graduate student life in general. “This year, we have focused on improving funding opportunities for graduate students, support and inclusion for international students and a family friendly policy for students with spouses and children,”���Froude said. Club Coordination Council The Club Coordination Council (CCC) allocated funds to clubs for this semester and will organize a much smaller winter reallocation of funds for next semester, president Kayla Delgado said. Clubs applied for funds last spring during the spring allocation process, Delgado said. “We get requests for more money than we receive from the Financial Management Board, but we do the best that we can to [help] the clubs,” CCC member Lauren Dugas said. Clubs can apply for more funds either through participation in winter reallocation or by appealing for funds for specific events,” Delgado said. “There is a winter reallocation process in which we do have the opportunity to allocate additional funds to clubs who apply,” Delgado said. There are two appeal funds controlled by the CCC, Delgado said. One is for clubs who have unexpected expenses with a specific event and the other is for clubs collaborating to put on an event. Financial Management Board The Financial Management Board (FMB) approved the allocation of funds to student groups for the 2010-2011 academic year, and will coordinate a reallocation of funds for the spring semester, Student Union Treasurer Sarah Hurtubise said. FMB monitors the financial activity of student organizations, as well as the distribution of funds for The Shirt Charity Fund. The Board must approve any events or expenses over $5,000. Hurtubise said not many changes have taken place this year regarding the allocation of funds. However, Hall Presidents Council did receive $1,000 more funding than last year because of the addition of Ryan Hall, she said. Hurtubise said the Off-Campus Council altered its constitution this year, making improvements from previous years. “We have a slightly bigger pool for winter reallocations, so we’re looking forward to helping out some more groups,” she said. Hurtubise said groups will soon give presentations to the Financial Management Board about why they need additional funds, and decisions about reallocation will be made from there. Hall Presidents Council Hall Presidents’ Council (HPC) has continued to improve pep rallies and promote dorm participation in the rallies this year, HPC executive co-chair Alexa Doyle said. The Council worked closely with student government and the University administration to improve the rallies, Doyle said. “We asked the hall presidents what their residents liked and didn’t like about the rallies,” Doyle said. “We also wanted to make it easier for people to attend the pep rallies.” HPC also oversaw dorm signature events and will continue to encourage attendance at dorm events for the remainder of the year. Doyle said HPC will do so through increased advertising and brother-sister dorm interaction for the remainder of the year. She said attendance increased at dorm events because of brother and sister dorms attending each other’s events. “HPC is an integral link to most of the student body,” Doyle said. “We want to use it as an outlet to make dorm events more well known and well attended.” Senior Class Council The Senior Class Council spent the first part of the semester focusing on community relations. Senior Class president Kate Clitheroe said the Council partnered with the Career Center to host a barbeque at the beginning of the semester. Clitheroe said the Council is planning a February service and networking event in Chicago, as well as a Press Box Dinner. “I am proud of the Senior Class Council’s commitment,” Clitheroe said. “Most events next semester will focus on post-graduate needs, including networking and establishing a way to keep in contact [with one another]. “And Senior Week planning is in full swing.” Junior Class Council The Junior Class Council found success in their philanthropy committee so far this year, class president James J. Ward said. The Council provided class members with the opportunity to raise money for flood relief in Pakistan and held the “She’s the First Campaign,” which assists underprivileged girls in attending school, Ward said. Ward said the junior class can expect more social events off campus next semester, including a dance called the “Chicago Ball,” to take place in downtown Chicago. “I’m really happy that we’ve managed to get the class to come to so many of our events even though half of their friends are abroad,” Ward said. Sophomore Class Council The Sophomore Class Council held the first ever Domecoming Week, full of class activities, class president Brett Rocheleau said. The week included a dodgeball tournament and a “Domecoming” dance that over 600 sophomores attended. The Council also hosted other events, including a Christmas party with kids from the Center for the Homeless, a class rosary and a class Mass. The Council is planning an ice skating event, as well as a poker tournament, for second semester. “Hopefully we will continue to have an event ever other week in the second semester,” Rocheleau said. Freshman Class Council Members of the Freshman Class Council used the first semester to adjust to student government and to host fundraising, social and service events, class president Heather Eaton said. The Council co-hosted the Yule Ball dance with the Sophomore Class Council and is currently in the process of selling their first piece of class apparel to students. Members are planning many events for second semester, including an informal forum on the topic of spirituality, a class Mass and selling Class of 2014 merchandise. “I am so proud of our Council’s dedication and enthusiasm,” Eaton said.last_img read more

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OIS: Notre Dame students are safe in Cairo

first_imgAs protests continue in Egypt, the 12 Notre Dame students currently studying at the American University of Cairo (AUC) are safe, according to a Friday website update from Notre Dame’s Office of International Studies (OIS). The note, directed toward the parents of students in Cairo, said OIS heard from one of the students via telephone. While students do not have Internet or mobile phone access, AUC officials allowed them to make one-minute phone calls from land lines. “OIS has received a voicemail from one of our Cairo students, calling on behalf of all of them,” the note stated. “They are all safe at the student residence in Zamalek.” Judy Hutchinson, program coordinator of Cairo study abroad, said the students are staying in their residences. “They are instructed not to participate in or otherwise go anywhere near the protests,” Hutchinson said. According to the website note to parents, AUC officials are advising the 12 Notre Dame students. Hutchinson said there are no Notre Dame faculty or staff members with the students in Cairo. “They are obeying the curfew and, as instructed, have not ventured from their residences nor in anyway been involved in any of the protests,” the note stated. “There are AUC officials in residence at Zamalek that are there to act as advisors to our students.” The note also said OIS is monitoring events in Cairo and expects updates from the AUC New York Office.last_img read more

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Group to make beds from bags

first_imgThere is more to a plastic bag than carrying groceries, senior Monica Aguirre, president of Saint Mary’s Environmental Action Coalition (SMEAC), said. The Coalition will be collecting plastic bags to make sleeping mats and send them abroad to disaster victims and several community organizations, Aguirre said. “We plan to contact a few organizations within the South Bend community, in order to see if they will take a few completed mats and hand them out to anyone living on the streets who would be interested,” she said. “They are very lightweight and weather resistant.” SMEAC advisor Cassie Majetic, a professor of biology, said the practice is popular around the country right now. “I actually first heard about this idea over the summer from my mother, who is a teacher and Girl Scouts volunteer,” Majetic said. “Since then, we’ve found numerous examples of youth and volunteer groups doing this, and SMEAC decided they want to be a part of it.” Right now, the group is collecting plastic bags from students outside 252 Science Hall at the College until Earth Week, which is April 17 to 23. Aguirre said students will be making the mats during the week. “During Earth Week, we will host a workshop teaching interested students how to make the mats, we will provide the bags as well, each student will then be responsible for turning in the completed mats before finals week,” Aguirre said. Majetic said it is important for students to save all their bags because it takes 500 to 700 plastic bags to create one mat. “Each [plastic] bag is cut apart and the loops are tied together to make plastic yarn, which is then crocheted into a mat,” Majetic said. “Each mat requires 500 to 700 individual bags, so we need as many donations as we can get.” Aside from the bag collection, the group is also conducting a school-wide recycling survey, Aguirre said. “Well we have a recycling survey out now,” Aguirre said. “Our club hopes to discover creative, new ways we can educate the campus about how to recycle. So anyone can complete it, it just takes about five minutes.” SMEAC’s main goal is to make Saint Mary’s a more environmentally-friendly campus, she said. “The Environmental Action Coalition is a club that works to educate the campus about environmental issues,” Aguirre said. “We want people to feel that they can personally make a difference with the simple choices they make.”last_img read more

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SCC sets a ‘knockout’ Guinness world record

first_imgIf at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. Last year’s Sophomore Class Council (SCC) kept this phrase in mind the past spring semester when they attempted to break the Guinness World Record for largest tournament of knockout basketball, a feat Keough Hall had fallen short of in the fall of 2011. The SCC achieved their goal March 2 when 433 people participated in the tournament in the Joyce Athletic and Convocation Center (JACC). The results were recently certified by Guinness. Junior Jake Frego, a member of last year’s SCC, said the council held the event to unite the sophomore class with a common goal. “Last year, one of the objectives of the SCC athletic committee was to help our class to realize a noteworthy achievement, and to have a great deal of fun while doing so,” he said. “We wanted the achievement to bring together our classmates and offer them some sort of subsequent recognition.” The council arranged with the men’s basketball team to hold the tournament immediately after the men’s last home game against Providence College. Keough Hall rector Fr. Pete McCormick, who spearheaded the attempt in the fall, said the collaboration helped the SCC succeed where Keough had come short. “They coordinated this whole event with men’s basketball and the community at large, and that was the reason we were able to make this happen,” he said. After the players exited, McCormick said everyone in the stands was invited to go down to the court and join the tournament. Frego said the participants included both students and members of the Notre Dame and South Bend communities. Throughout the tournament, the council took steps to ensure Guinness would validate the attempt if they broke the record. “We were required to inform Guinness of our record attempt and had to submit a very detailed description,” Frego said. On the day of the record attempt, McCormick said every participant was asked to sign a waiver, and the event was recorded. Guinness also required a counter who sat at the foul line to double-check that the names on the waivers were legitimate, and two witnesses not associated with the University to verify the event. Despite the success of the event, McCormick said he does not anticipate an immediate attempt to exceed the record. “For now there are no plans, but it’s one of those things that if some other school would try to break it or actually break it, then I would expect that we would try to regain that record,” he said. The event proved to be an extraordinary achievement for the class, Frego said. “We hoped to demonstrate that if Notre Dame students unite behind an effort, they can achieve something remarkable – even a Guinness World Record,” he said.last_img read more

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Board promotes diversity through conference

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Student Diversity Board (SDB) will host its biggest event of the year after spring break when it sponsors the eighth annual Diverse Students’ Leadership Conference (DSLC) on March 19 and 20. Senior Maddie Meckes, chair of DSLC and vice president of SDB, said the event intends to motivate participants to spark social change.   “The goal of the conference is to allow participants to enrich their perspectives of the adversities and benefits within diverse academic, social and professional settings,” Meckes said. “Our theme this year is ‘From Awareness to Action: Change Your Mind, Ways & World.’ We want participants to be inspired to become catalysts for change in their communities.” Meckes has worked with senior co-chair and SDB secretary Jean Osberger to publicize the event, and several hundred students have already signed up to attend. “We worked with the Career Crossings Office to plan this, and we have five alumnae panelists from the South Bend area attending,” Meckes said. The keynote addresses will come from a wide range of speakers, Meckes said, each with a different perspective on diversity. The opening speaker, Daisy Hernandez, is co-editor of ‘Colonize This!: Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism.’ She will speak at 12 p.m. March 19 in Carroll Auditorium. “[Hernandez] speaks on equality, feminism, race and politics,” Meckes said. “Derreck Kayongo is our closing keynote speaker on March 20 at 6 p.m. in Carroll Auditorium. He is a refugee from Uganda and founded the Global Soap Project, which recycles used soap from hotels for new soap in third-world countries.” Kayongo, who was a Top 10 CNN Hero in 2011, will speak about his experiences and how he became a catalyst for change, Meckes said. The keynote speaker for the high school track is Elliott Lewis, a news reporter and law student at the University of Akron. He will discuss biracialism in America and his book “Fade.” Meckes said the speakers were chosen for this year’s conference because of their backgrounds in social justice and their proven ability to influence change in their communities. “The goal of DSLC is for participants to recognize the need for change in society and desire to create that change,” she said. “All three keynotes have recognized the need for change and worked, either through their writing or their careers, to make a positive change in the world.” Osberger said she is especially excited about the speakers because of their ability to connect with the audience. “I look forward to Daisy Hernandez’s keynote address because … she is charismatic and funny, but her message for feminism and equality is particularly pertinent to our student body,” Osberger said. “We are also honored to host Kayongo who speaks directly to our theme as a key international figure who has innovated positive change in developing countries.” The live salsa band “La Republica” will provide entertainment for the conference, Osberger said, and there will also be salsa lessons in Dalloway’s Coffeehouse at 7 p.m. on March 20. There also will be an alumnae lunch March 20. All workshops will be in the conference rooms of the Saint Mary’s Student Center. Registration for DSLC is available on OrgSync and is open to the public. For more information about registration, visit https://orgsync.com/56318/forms/6541last_img read more

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Power outage darkens campus

first_imgA power outage across campus left several dorms and classrooms in the dark Wednesday morning, but campus officials have not yet determined the cause, according to an email from Paul Kempf, director of utilities and maintenance.The email was sent to building managers and rectors Wednesday afternoon.“While performing a minor maintenance activity this morning at our electrical substation an unexpected and currently unexplained anomaly resulted in the loss of our interconnect with the grid,” Kempf said in the email. “The result of this loss required the shedding of electrical loads affecting a portion of campus. Our systems are currently stable, but the cause of the issue still remains unexplained.”University spokesman Dennis Brown said only parts of campus were affected by the power outage, which began just before 9:30 a.m.“About 50 percent of the campus was without power for 10 minutes,” Brown said.Workers were scheduled to investigate the cause of the outage by testing the electrical system after 9 p.m. Wednesday, which would cause “some risk of a repeat occurrence,” Kempf said in the email. He told The Observer on Wednesday night another outage was not expected.“The problem we had this morning isn’t totally explained yet,” Kempf said. “… We’re trying to avoid the disruption to classes, and this evening is when we’re trying to work on it.”Breen-Phillips, Farley, Zahm, Cavanaugh, Alumni, Pangborn, Dillon, Lyons, Carroll, Duncan, Welsh Family, McGlinn and O’Neill were reportedly among the affected dorms, according to hall residents.The outage went unnoticed by some West Quad residents because of backup generators kicking in, according to students.“We had backup generators so it was pretty hard to notice,” junior Thom Behrens, a Duncan Hall resident, said. Junior Kyle McCaffery said generators also supplied electricity to O’Neill Hall during the outage.The Hayes-Healy Center and O’Shaughnessy, Galvin, and Geddes Halls lost power, according to students present in the buildings during the outage. DeBartolo Hall was not affected.Brown said Main Building and the Joyce Athletic and Convocation Center also lost power.Rectors cautioned their residents to take precautions throughout Wednesday night’s testing period.“As tests are conducted this evening, the campus may experience rolling power outages after 9 p.m.,” Morrissey rector Ronald Vierling said in an email sent to the hall.In the event of a second outage, “your ID [cards] will not be able to swipe you into any building,” Elaine DeBassige, Farley Hall rector, said in an email to residents.Kempf advised students to limit their use of electronics Wednesday night.“If you’re doing something and you don’t necessarily need to have it on after nine o’clock, you can turn it off,” he said.Brown said the outage was not related to the Aug. 20 partial collapse of a cooling cell in the University’s steam generation system, which provides cool water and air conditioning to campus.Tags: blackout, Dennis Brown, electricity, Paul Kempf, power outage, residence halls, utilitieslast_img read more

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Indiana lieutenant governor to speak at ‘LeadHER’ panel

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s College Women’s Entrepreneurship Initiative (WEI) and the Career Crossings Collegiate Speaker Series will host Indiana Lt. Gov. Sue Ellspermann and her chief of staff Tonya Brothers-Bridge on Tuesday for a panel discussion titled “LeadHER.”The panel will take place between 7 and 9 p.m. in O’Laughlin Auditorium and consist of local community leaders who will direct the conversation and ask questions of Ellspermann and Brothers-Bridge.According to Saint Mary’s website, the discussion will center around topics such as “fearless leadership, transitions in life and the power of women mentorship.” Associate project director for the WEI Joan McClendon will moderate the event.McClendon said female leaders from the community including president and CEO of the YWCA North Central Indiana, Linda Baechle, president and CEO of Michiana Partnership, Regina Emberton, while Saint Mary’s students Eleanor Jones and Ambar Varela will also join the panel.Brothers-Bridge visited Saint Mary’s on May 27 for an entrepreneurial leadership event and asked if she and the lieutenant governor could return, McClendon said.“She really enjoyed her time here and asked if they could come back to visit, including touring the campus and meeting the students,” McClendon said. “We are an all-women’s college so it is a natural fit for them to come.”Ellspermann and Brothers-Bridge’s experience working together will be a key component of the talk, College director of media relations Gwen O’Brien said.“Part of the reason we even asked Tonya to come was because she had an opportunity to share her relationship with the lieutenant governor,” O’Brien said. “She talked a lot about her relationship with the lieutenant governor [on her previous visit] so I think that will be important. I want and hope that women can take away that women can come together in a professional and in a personal level.”McClendon said when she spoke to Brothers-Bridge, she asked what Ellspermann and Brothers-Bridge could bring to Saint Mary’s and what they wanted to discuss.“Obviously they work together and have worked together before,” McClendon said. ” … They can speak to college students, either coming from high school into college, college students leaving and women making transitions in their careers and lifestyles.“We have more in common than we do differences, so you have this beautiful opportunity to have these two very influential women to come in and share their very influential experiences,” she said.Women of different generations will be represented at LeadHER, O’Brien said, and they will each learn something different depending on where they are in their life.“To me, this talk is another example of how women help women,” O’Brien said. “We just do, we don’t hesitate with ‘what if.’ We’re talking to a couple different generations but wherever they are in their life, they could use a pep talk on how to make that transition in life or how to be a mentor.”“There are some awesome women in the community that need to meet these awesome women inside Saint Mary’s College,” McClendon said. “And let’s not just meet but let’s develop synergy and relationships. That’s my passion, and I believe that is the passion of the lieutenant governor and her chief of staff. As a matter of fact I know that that is their passion, and that’s why they’re coming here.”A photo booth and refreshments will be available at the talk, McClendon said. The event is free but ticketed.Tags: LeadHER, women leaders, Women’s Entrepreneurship Initiativelast_img read more

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Student senate discusses sustainability, Onward

first_imgStudent Senate met Wednesday night for presentations on new sustainability initiatives in the dining halls, the NOVO registration program and Onward, student government’s new online forum for students. Linda Kurtos, director of sustainability, addressed student complaints about the removal of styrofoam cups from the dining halls, saying sustainability has a unique set of priorities.“Something to remember about styrofoam is it really is a very bad actor in the world of sustainability,” Kurtos said. “ When we talk about sustainability, we think about ‘How do we do the best, first for people, then the planet and then for profit?’” Kurtos also discussed what the money saved will be used for. “Part of this program is to reallocate some of the money saved from not buying the polystyrene cups and put it toward more local and more sustainable food,” she said. “So now, we’re using all a local dairy farmer for our dairy products in the dining halls.”After Kurtos’ presentation, Chuck Hurley, University registrar, held a discussion with student senators about NOVO, the class registration system that replaced DART this fall, including information about future updates that will be made, such as adding CIF forms. The meeting ended with a presentation from Student Body President Bryan Ricketts, Director of Constituent Services John Kill and Director of Campus Technology Michael McRoskey about Onward, an online forum to give students a place to post their concerns. Kill said Onward will be a student-driven way to address problems and offer possible solutions.“We’re trying to establish this idea of problem and solution. It falls under what we call ‘ideation to probable action,’” he said. Only Notre Dame undergraduate students will be able to access Onward, which is set to launch next week – faculty and graduate students will not be able to see it. Ricketts described the program as being “like Yik Yak, but not anonymous.” Students can make and vote on posts; posts with more votes will receive more attention. In order to improve transparency with student government and the administration, McRoskey and Ricketts said problems that are being addressed will be “pinned” to the top of the feed with updates to let users know the problem is being handled. Ricketts said he hopes this new program will encourage students to be more vocal about their concerns. “When Nidia [Ruelas, student body vice president,] and I were out campaigning, we went and knocked on pretty much every door on campus, talked to every student that we could and got a lot of great ideas,” he said. “It’d be great if we could do that every day, but we can’t. Senators can bring their ideas to us, but there’s 8,000 students at this school and they have ideas and concerns to share.”The student senate meets every Wednesday at 6 p.m. in the Notre Dame Room of LaFortune Student Center. All meetings are open to the public.Tags: Chuck Hurley, NOVO registration, Office of Sustainability, Onward, Student government, student senatelast_img read more

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SMC students’ costumes featured on Buzzfeed

first_imgTags: ’90s, costumes, halloween, Weddings Five Saint Mary’s students decided to dress up for Halloween as a ’90s themed bridal party, and in a span of two days, pictures of the students and their costumes were featured by BuzzFeed, Cosmopolitan, Elite Daily and HelloGiggles.The original BuzzFeed article, published Nov. 1, “A Group of College Friends Dressed Up As 90s Bridal Party For Halloween And Had A Fake Wedding,” features the students posing for wedding pictures in their costumes and describing what they did to mimic a wedding.One of the “bridesmaids,” junior Claire Condon said junior Bridget Hogan, the “bride,” originally thought of the idea two weeks before Halloween, and the group of friends unanimously agreed to it.“They all went to the Salvation Army and St. Vincent’s, and they bought the most ridiculous dresses,” Condon said. “I said to pick me something ugly. It was like a real wedding day. We were counting down the days like it was real.”Condon explained that when the girls were getting ready for the “wedding,” she decided to start documenting the experience. She took more than 150 pictures that resembled typical wedding day events and posted them on social media sites.“We all have the same monogram glasses, and we all have the same matching robes with the monograms on them,” she said. “Then we went down to the chapel, and we all went down the aisle, took pictures and came back. Everyone at the party thought our costumes were hilarious. We were like celebrities.”“I put it up as if it were a real album,” Condon said. “I made the album public, only friends of friends could see it, but that’s how all those sites got ahold of all the pictures, too. I went out on a whim, went on Buzzfeed, clicked on the viral page and just clicked the writer’s name [Stephanie McNeal]. I had no idea who she was or anything about her, but I just sent her an email.”Condon explained that after pitching the idea to BuzzFeed, she heard back a day later, and then she and the lead writer exchanged emails.“Next thing I know, I got an email back from her saying thanks, with a link to BuzzFeed attached. We were all cracking up, and we shared it. We were saying, ‘We peaked, look at us,’” Condon said.Condon said people on the Internet were not all supportive of the costume.“Some people were very mean on the comments — they said things like, ‘These girls know nothing about the ’90s,’ ‘They desecrated a church,’ and that our cats must have been busy,” Condon said.Condon said the story, which reached the No. 9 trending story on BuzzFeed and had gotten 100,000 views in one day, was a fun albeit strange experience.“The whole thing was very unreal; it snowballed. It’s bizarre. I keep laughing about it,” she said.last_img read more

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Theology professor dies in San Antonio

first_imgTheology professor Fr. Virgilio Elizondo, who is widely considered the founder of U.S. Latino theology and received the 1997 Laetare Medal, committed suicide Monday in San Antonio, according to a South Bend Tribune report. “San Antonio Police Department officers were called at 1:55 p.m. Monday to a house owned by Elizondo,” the report stated.“The Bexar County medical examiner confirmed to the [San Antonio] Express-News on Tuesday that Elizondo was pronounced dead five minutes after officers arrived, of a self-inflicted gunshot wound.”Elizondo, the University of Notre Dame professor of Pastoral and Hispanic Theology, was named in a 2015 San Antonio civil suit alleging Elizondo sexually abused the unnamed plaintiff when he was a minor, according to a report originally run by WSBT. Elizondo last taught at the University during the spring 2015 term, University spokesperson Dennis Brown said in an email. The lawsuit was filed against the Archdiocese of San Antonio, Fr. Jesus Armando Dominguez and Elizondo in Bexar County district court. It alleges Dominguez repeatedly sexually abused the plaintiff, listed as “John Doe” in the 1980s. When the plaintiff asked Elizondo for help dealing with Dominguez’s abuse in 1983, the lawsuit alleges “Elizondo began to fondle the Plaintiff’s genitals, taking advantage of the same sexual liberties Plaintiff complained of with Father Dominguez.”In a report in the Express-News, Elizondo denied the allegations.“The allegations made against me are not true and have absolutely no basis in fact,” Elizondo said in the Express-News report. “I deny all the claims which have been asserted against me.”The lawyer representing the plaintiff in the lawsuit, Thomas J. Henry, said Elizondo’s death is “unfortunate,” mysantonio.com reported Tuesday. “The next stage in this litigation was discovery production and the taking of depositions,” Henry said. “The taking of Father Elizondo’s deposition could have led us to the truth regarding his actions, and his untimely death at this juncture raises even more questions. We will continue to seek and uncover the facts of this matter.”Tags: Theology, Virgilio Elizondolast_img read more

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