Efficient offense powers TCU to 6-3 opening day win over Penn State

first_imgFacebook ReddIt Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ Equestrian earns last seed in NCEA team bracket A COVID-19 Charles Schwab Challenge Facebook Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ printThe No. 1 Horned Frogs took their 2017 season opener against Penn State on Friday at Lupton Stadium by a score of 6-3.TCU had six stellar innings from Redshirt Sophomore Jared Janczak en route to the victory over the Nittany Lions. Janczak faced the minimum number of batters through six innings before losing his control in the seventh, loading the bases with no outs after starting the inning with a hit batter and a walk.“It kind of felt like a regional,” Janczak said. “The atmosphere was great. The fans were awesome.”Janczak’s not new to the big stage after making pivotal starts throughout the 2016 postseason. TCU head coach Jim Schlossnagle said Janczak’s shaky seventh could be attributed to sitting through two pitching changes in the bottom of the sixth.“Janczak I thought was outstanding,” Schlossnagle said. “He was pitching ahead in the count, just throwing quality pitches at the bottom of the strike zone.”The scoring got started for the Frogs in the second inning when Nolan Brown followed a Josh Watson walk with a double down the left field line. An errant throw in from the outfield allowed Watson to score and Brown to advance to third. Cam Warner drove in the second run for TCU on a fielder’s choice.PSU’s lone hit of the first six innings came with one out in the fourth when third baseman Connor Klemann doubled into the right center gap. Klemann was thrown out trying to stretch it into a triple on a fantastic relay from Brown to Warner to Elliott Barzilli.TCU doubled their lead in the bottom of the fourth without having the ball leave the infield. A bases loaded RBI fielder’s choice from Cam Warner followed by a passed ball scoring Luken Baker put the Frogs ahead 4-0.Penn State’s starter Sal Biasi went just 3.1 innings, allowing four runs on 1 hit while walking four and striking out seven.The Horned Frog’s fifth and sixth runs came in the sixth inning on a Connor Wanhanen two out, two run single to center. The single was TCU’s second and final hit of the night.Coming off a 2016 season in which Wanhanen hit just .231, Schlossnagle was happy to see Wanhanen start the new season on a high note.“Wanhanen didn’t have the season he wanted so I was glad to see Connor get that hit, get some confidence.”Wanhanen was glad that the season was finally here after seven months of hard work since TCU’s trip to Omaha.“It was great to be back out here. We’re all really excited,” said Wanhanen. “This group of guys is something special.”After Janczak loaded the bases in the top of the seventh, Schlossnagle called on Sophomore Sean Wymer. Wymer allowed all three inherited runners to score on two fielder’s choices and a bloop single to left field. A ground ball to Barzilli left two stranded on base and held TCU’s lead at three. Janczak went 6+ innings of two hit, six strikeout ball picking up win number one of the season.Wymer came back out for the eighth inning retiring the Nittany Lions in 1-2-3 fashion with two strikeouts. Although he allowed the three inherited runners to score in the seventh, Wymer gave up no runs of his own on one hit and three strikeouts.The Frogs went quietly in the bottom half of the eighth, taking a 6-3 lead into the ninth.Sophomore standout closer Durbin Feltman opened the ninth with an electrifying 97 MPH strike that set the tone for a smooth nine pitch inning. Feltman threw all strikes in a three-up-three-down save, recording one strikeout.The team will return to the diamond on Saturday as Brian Howard takes the mound against PSU. First pitch is set for 2 p.m. Twitter + posts TCU starting pitcher Jared Janczak (Photo by Michael Clements) TAGSgame wonTCU in title Iqbal leads women’s golf to fourth-place finish at Big 12 Tournament Branson Nelson center_img World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ Women’s golf heads to Oklahoma for chance at first Big 12 title Twitter Linkedin Branson Nelsonhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/branson-nelson/ ReddIt Previous article#MashForMicah exemplifies Frog Fam’s unityNext articleFinal Frogs for the Cure celebration honors 12 years with Ann Louden Branson Nelson RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Branson is a junior journalism major from Fort Worth, Texas. He enjoys writing about all sports and plans to go to law school after graduation. Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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Horned Frogs refuse to dwell on past in preparation for Texas

first_img Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Twitter ReddIt Nov 25, 2016; Austin, TX, USA; Texas Christian Horned Frogs quarterback Kenny Hill (7) carries the ball against the Texas Longhorns during the first half at Darrell K Royal-Texas Stadium. TCU won 31-9. Mandatory Credit: Brendan Maloney-USA TODAY Sports Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Twitter Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Facebook Previous articleSeniors can order class rings on campus this weekNext articleThe Skiff: November 2, 2017 Robbie Vaglio RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TCU wants ex-professor’s discrimination suit dismissed ReddIt Robbie Vaglio I am the executive editor of TCU 360 from Raleigh, North Carolina. If you walk by my desk in the newsroom you’ll immediately know I’m Post Malone’s biggest fan. I’m always looking for a good story to tell! If you have any story ideas, feel free to reach out! Go Panthers!center_img Facebook World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution + posts Two students joined harassment and discrimination lawsuit against TCU The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years “I tweeted that because I believe that whenever you reach a high amount of success, there has to be a reset, a clue that you have to stay on schedule to continue to do what we have done to get to this point,” he said. “Saturday was our learning lesson.”The Frogs will have to have learned from last week’s breakdown, as the Longhorns will enter the stadium as a 4-4 program, but their record doesn’t accurately reflect how well the team has played in recent weeks. Texas holds a 3-2 record in Big 12 Conference action, coming off a 38-7 victory over Baylor in Waco and were forced to play three games against top 12 opponents in a span of four weeks, one of the nation’s toughest schedules. The stretch includes losses against USC, Oklahoma State and Oklahoma, and wins against Kansas State, Baylor and Iowa State.One player that the Horned Frogs must pay close attention to in preparation for Saturday’s potential defensive showdown is Malik Jefferson. The junior linebacker leads the defensive force the Longhorns pose. He also leads the team with 76 tackles, including 54 solo tackles. He has a team-high 8.5 tackles for loss, four sacks and five quarterback rushes. He set a career high for tackles against Oklahoma State where he recorded 14 tackles.Patterson praised the defensive prowess posed by Texas. The Longhorn defense has been dominant on the line, stopping the opposing team’s run game. Texas is only allowing 87.7 rushing yards per game over their last seven games, holding four opponents to under 100 yards. They rank seventh in the nation in third-down defense (.261), second in fourth-down defense (.143) and first with five defensive touchdowns scored.TCU is 1-0 when rushing for less than 100 yards this season, defeating the Kansas State Wildcats on Oct. 14. The Frogs rushed for a total of 98 yards on the afternoon.“They’re fast and they play with a high amount of effort,” Diarse said. “They’re very similar to last week’s opponent. From what I have seen on film, these guys play very well together. From the front four to the back eight, they are talented all over the field.”Diarse added that he is excited for the atmosphere and the spark that playing at home provides the team.“It’s always huge playing in the Carter,” he said. “It’s always special. Just being able to be back in front of Frog Nation, they cheer us on and compel us to do what we do best. There’s no better feeling than that.”Patterson is looking forward to Saturday’s matchup and said that the team has been the “most attentive” during this week’s practice compared to the rest of the season.No. 8 TCU will kick off against Texas in Amon G. Carter Stadium at 6:15 Saturday evening. What to watch during quarantine printTCU will welcome a new-look Texas team to Amon G. Carter Stadium Saturday evening. This game will mark Tom Herman’s first game against the Horned Frogs as the head coach of the Longhorns.TCU head coach Gary Patterson made few remarks about last week’s performance against No. 25 Iowa State during his weekly press conference. Patterson addressed senior quarterback Kenny Hill’s performance and the unjustified unrest from the Horned Frog faithful.“They don’t know anything about Kenny,” Patterson said. “They don’t know that a wide receiver didn’t run his route about four times. The easiest person to blame is the quarterback. He’s going to have to play better, but he’s giving us what he’s asked. Everyone has in their mind that Iowa State is the same Iowa State from the past; Iowa State is not Iowa State.”Now Patterson and his team are on to their next opponent: the Texas Longhorns.“Texas is a really good football team,” Patterson said. “They’ve been playing really well on defense lately, but they know how to get things done in ball games.Senior wide receiver John Diarse said he believes there are a few positive takeaways from a loss.“We still have something to play for, and that makes getting over that process much easier and much faster,” he said. “It could have been worse, and we still have the same undefeated team. There are no new strategies and no new coaches.Following the loss, Diarse tweeted that this loss was something the team needed. Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Linkedin Snow temporarily stepping down as honors dean Linkedinlast_img read more

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Poland: Record fine for Polish TV news channel

first_img Reporters Without Borders (RSF) is alarmed by the record fine of 350,000 euros that was imposed yesterday on TVN24, a privately-owned Polish TV news channel, regarding the fine as designed to throttle a media outlet that is critical of the government. With firing of four editors, “repolonisation” under way in Poland News PolandEurope – Central Asia Media independence Judicial harassmentEconomic pressure June 2, 2021 Find out more December 12, 2017 Poland: Record fine for Polish TV news channel PolandEurope – Central Asia Media independence Judicial harassmentEconomic pressure Use the Digital Services Act to make democracy prevail over platform interests, RSF tells EU Poland’s new social media law puts freedom of expression at risk, RSF warns Receive email alerts Follow the news on Poland The fine was ordered by Poland’s National Broadcasting Council (KRRiT), which regulates the broadcast media. It said TVN24 “promoted illegal actions” and “encouraged behaviour threatening the country’s security” in its coverage of anti-government demonstrations in December 2016, when it showed opposition leaders urging the population to participate in the protests. The Polish opposition has described the huge fine as a violation of media freedom and as a new attempt to gag an independent media outlet. The TV channel, which has been controlled by US media company Scripps Networks Interactive since March 2015, has said it plans to appeal. “We condemn this very disturbing decision by the KRRiT, an entity created by the current government and subservient to the ruling Law and Justice party, because it is clearly designed to gag a media outlet opposed to the government,” said Pauline Adès-Mével, the head of RSF’s EU-Balkans desk.”The sanction bodes ill at a time when the government is getting ready to ask parliament to vote on measures aimed at ‘re-Polishizing’ the country’s media by driving foreign investors out of the domestic media market.” Poland is ranked 54th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2017 World Press Freedom Index, seven places lower than in the 2016 index, in which it suffered a spectacular 29-place fall. News Organisation RSF_en to go further Help by sharing this information May 10, 2021 Find out more News News January 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Young People Have a Part to Play in God’s Plan of Love

first_img Community News More Cool Stuff I don’t usually read Rolling Stone magazine. But in the current issue the cover story is about our Holy Father, Pope Francis. So I guess the Pope is officially “cool.” Because Rolling Stone says so.I think the Pope is great, too. I’ve had the blessing to meet with him and celebrate Mass with him. He is a holy man — a man who knows Jesus and wants to serve him with all his life. And there is nothing greater than that!And since he was elected last year, Pope Francis has the whole world talking about God and religion and the relation of faith to life. That’s not easy to do in this culture, which is so secular and so concerned with things like entertainment and money. But Pope Francis has found a way to do it.And our Pope has a special love for young people. At World Youth Day last summer, he said to all the young people in the Church:“The Lord needs you, young people, for his Church. … Today too, he is calling each of you to follow him in his Church and to be missionaries. The Lord is calling you today! … You are the ones who hold the future! I ask you to be builders of the world, to work for a better world. … Don’t be observers of life, but get involved. … Immerse yourself in the reality of life, as Jesus did.”That’s what a Catholic education prepares you for — whether in our schools or in religious education in the parish. It’s all about getting young people ready. So that you can listen to what God is saying to you in your heart. So that you can answer his call and follow Jesus — generously and with courage.My young friends, God has made you. You are children of God! That’s something amazing.You didn’t just appear on this earth out of nowhere. The Creator of the universe made you. He wanted you — each one of you — for a reason. God thought about you before you were born. And he’s still thinking about you. He knows your name. God is still deeply interested in your life.Each one of you has a part to play in God’s plan of love. That’s what Pope Francis is talking about. You are called to be friends with Jesus. To follow him and to be a witness to his Gospel.Your Catholic formation — in your schools, in your parishes, in your homes — is getting you ready to be involved in the realities of this world — in our culture, in our neighborhoods, in our economy and government.Jesus wants us to change the world. Every day. Little by little. He wants us to make the world a better place, more like the Kingdom of God. More caring, more compassionate, more peaceful, more just.God is sending us out to other people. To the people in our homes, in our classes, in our neighborhoods. To the people we work with. To everybody we meet in our daily life. He wants us to share the love of God with everyone.We change the world by our love, by our holiness. By trying to be saints and missionaries in our everyday lives. It’s not about words. Our words don’t mean anything without the witness of our lives. Just be kind. Be gentle. Just live your faith — in simple ways, with joy. With happiness. Try to be good sons, good daughters. Good brothers and sisters. And good friends.If we have love in our hearts, then those around us will feel that love. Because love is like a fire. All it takes is a little spark, and you can set others on fire with your love.The Pope is right, my young friends. You are the future — the future of the Church and the future of the world.So let’s keep trusting in Jesus. Let’s keep praying and reading the Gospels. Jesus will never let you down. Even in your toughest times, he is with you. Go to him. Talk to him. Ask Jesus every day, all the time: “Lord, what do you want me to do?”I am praying for you every day. Please pray for me in my ministry. I need your prayers.And I ask our Blessed Mother Mary to watch over you and your families. May she intercede for all of us. May she teach us to say “yes” to the call of Jesus — that we may follow him always as disciples and missionaries.Archbishop Gomez’s book, “Immigration and the Next America,” is available at the Cathedral Gift Shop (www.olacathedralgifts.com/immigrationandthenextamericarenewingthesoulofournation.aspx). Follow him at www.facebook.com/ArchbishopGomez. Herbeauty5 Things To Avoid If You Want To Have Whiter TeethHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty8 Easy Exotic Meals Anyone Can MakeHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Sea Salt Scrubs You Can Make YourselfHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Strong Female TV Characters Who Deserve To Have A SpinoffHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Fashion Tips Are Making Tall Girls The Talk Of The TownHerbeautyHerbeauty EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS 18 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  First Heatwave Expected Next Week Community News Faith Leader Q&A Interview Young People Have a Part to Play in God’s Plan of Love By ARCHBISHOP JOSE H. GOMEZ for THE TIDINGS Published on Wednesday, February 5, 2014 | 2:22 pmcenter_img Top of the News Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Make a comment faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Business News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

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Church of tomorrow needs to repair past sins

first_imgWhatsApp NewsSocietyChurch of tomorrow needs to repair past sinsBy Staff Reporter – August 15, 2018 1699 Facebook Bishop Brendan Leahy.THE CATHOLIC church needs to acknowledge the “dark aspects” of its history in the sexual abuse of minors, the wielding of power and the violent treatment of young people in institutions, if the church is to “repair” in preparation for the Pope’s coming.That was the message given by Bishop Brendan Leahy in a Feast of the Assumption of Mary homily at the Mass Rock in Killeedy, in County Limerick, following Mass earlier at Ashford Church this Wednesday.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Bishop Leahy said that the visit of Pope Francis has put Ireland at a crossroads in what he described as a pivotal moment for the Church in Ireland.It is time for the Church “to acknowledge our past, both good and bad”, he told Wednesday’s gathering.“It is good for us to recall with a grateful heart just how much the Church contributed to Irish society. But to acknowledge with gratitude the good can never eclipse recognition of sin, criminality and evil, he said.Bishop Leahy referenced a clericalism that ended up confusing power and ministry, the sexual abuse of minors by clergy and religious that did untold life-long damage to victims, the violent and repressive treatment by church representatives of young people sent to the State’s reformatory institutions and the dark experience of vulnerable women in places meant to be residences of refuge.“Sadly, as has been highlighted, cover-up, wilful or otherwise, and mismanagement compounded the damage, adding to our shame.“We need,” he said, “to prepare for the Pope’s coming with a desire to want to “repair” the Church first of all by seeking forgiveness for the sins of the past. As well as needing to pray for those who have been wounded we need to keep listening and to learn from them how to clarify and repair our church.”Bishop Leahy said that the Mass Rock location would help bring the church out into the open, adding that, “Catholics can be downbeat today because it is painful to acknowledge in our family story that we have wounded people, but we need to move forward, attentive to what the Spirit is saying to us.”  Previous articleFéile na Gréine: 3 days, 5 venues and over 24 actsNext articleEducate Together has temporary home Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Advertisement Print Population of Mid West region increased by more than 3,000 in past year Is Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! center_img Limerick on Covid watch list TAGSchurchLimerick City and Countyreligion Email Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Unstoppable Sean shows that all things are possiblelast_img read more

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‘Slow and Steady Decrease’: Shifts in Mortgage Forbearance Rates

first_imgHome / Daily Dose / ‘Slow and Steady Decrease’: Shifts in Mortgage Forbearance Rates Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago in Daily Dose, Featured, News Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Christina Hughes Babb is a reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Southern Methodist University, she has been a reporter, editor, and publisher in the Dallas area for more than 15 years. During her 10 years at Advocate Media and Dallas Magazine, she published thousands of articles covering local politics, real estate, development, crime, the arts, entertainment, and human interest, among other topics. She has won two national Mayborn School of Journalism Ten Spurs awards for nonfiction, and has penned pieces for Texas Monthly, Salon.com, Dallas Observer, Edible, and the Dallas Morning News, among others. 2020-10-06 Christina Hughes Babb The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days agocenter_img Share Save Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Sign up for DS News Daily October 6, 2020 1,124 Views Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago  Print This Post Subscribe Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Previous: Housing Outlook Maybe Not as ‘Rosy’ as it Seems Next: Golden State Minority Homeowners, Renters Feeling Extra Financial Strain The number of loans now in forbearance dipped six basis points from 6.87% of servicers’ portfolio volume the week before to 6.81% as of Sept. 27, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association’s (MBA) latest Forbearance and Call Volume Survey. A total of 3.4 million homeowners are in forbearance plans, the MBA estimates.  This survey represents 74% of the first-mortgage servicing market or 37.1 million loans.For the 17th consecutive week, there was a decline in the share of Freddie Mae and Freddie loans in forbearance, sitting at 4.39%, an uptick of 7 basis-points. Meantime, there was a one basis point bounce to 9.16% in Ginnie Mae loans in forbearance. The forbearance share for portfolio loans and private-label securities (PLS) toppled 13 basis points to 10.39%.Also falling, 8 basis points to 7.03%, was the percentage of loans in forbearance for depository servicers. And they weren’t alone. The percentage of loans in forbearance for independent mortgage bank (IMB) servicers, also took a hit, plunging 4 basis points to 7.19%.”As of the end of September, there continues to be a slow and steady decrease in the share of loans in forbearance—driven by consistent declines in the GSE loan share—and a persistently high amount in the Ginnie Mae portfolio,” said Mike Fratantoni, MBA’s Senior Vice President and Chief Economist. “The significant churn in the labor market now, more than six months into the pandemic, is still causing financial distress for millions of homeowners. As a result, more than 70% of loans in forbearance are now in an extension.”The total number of loans in forbearance fell by 38 basis points to 7.8% as of July 12, 2020, with the MBA estimating 3.9 million homeowners are still in forbearance plans, DSNews reported at the time.The MBA’s prior report found 8.18% of loans were in forbearance. Its latest survey covers the period from July 6 through July 12 and represents 75% of the mortgage market or 37.3 million loans.Loans guaranteed by the GSEs that are in forbearance fell for the sixth consecutive week to 5.64%, which is a 43-basis-point drop. Ginnie Mae loans in forbearance fell 30 basis points to 10.26%.”The share of loans in forbearance dropped to its lowest level in over two months, driven by an increase in the pace of exits as more homeowners have been able to get back to work,” said Mike Fratantoni, MBA’s SVP and Chief Economist. “The decline in the forbearance share was broad-based, with decreases for GSE, Ginnie Mae, and portfolio/PLS loans.”Fratantoni added that nearly half of the borrowers remaining in forbearance plans are now in an extension of the original term.“The pace of new forbearance requests remains quite low compared to earlier in the crisis, but we are watching carefully for any increases due to either the pick-up in COVID-19 cases or the cessation of enhanced unemployment insurance benefits at the end of this month,” he said. ‘Slow and Steady Decrease’: Shifts in Mortgage Forbearance Rates About Author: Christina Hughes Babblast_img read more

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Delhi Police Raid Office Of Mehmood Pracha, Lawyer Of Several Accused In Riots Conspiracy Cases

first_imgNews UpdatesDelhi Police Raid Office Of Mehmood Pracha, Lawyer Of Several Accused In Riots Conspiracy Cases LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK24 Dec 2020 6:36 AMShare This – xThe Special Cell of the Delhi Police on Thursday raided the office of Mehmood Pracha, an advocate is representing many accused in the Delhi riots conspiracy cases.The Delhi Police has reportedly said that the raid was based on a warrant from a local court to search for “incriminating documents” and “metadata of outbox” of the official email address of Pracha’s law firm.In a video of the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Special Cell of the Delhi Police on Thursday raided the office of Mehmood Pracha, an advocate is representing many accused in the Delhi riots conspiracy cases.The Delhi Police has reportedly said that the raid was based on a warrant from a local court to search for “incriminating documents” and “metadata of outbox” of the official email address of Pracha’s law firm.In a video of the raid posted in twitter by journalist Aditya Menon, Pracha is seen objecting to the seizure of his laptop by the police, citing client-attorney privilege. Pracha is seen saying that the police may examine the laptop but cannot seize it as it will amount to breach of attorney-client privilege. He is also seen telling the police that seizure will be in violation of the court order. The police officer in the video is seen replying that he wants to take the ‘hard drive'”This is in violation of the order”: Advocate @MehmoodPracha tells police regarding seizure of his office computer and laptop https://t.co/5RnLeU4pIg pic.twitter.com/L0Z1YdNvLi— Aditya Menon (@AdityaMenon22) December 24, 2020 As per reports, the raid, which started around 12.30 PM, is still on. In another video posted by journalist Fatima Khan in twitter, Pracha is seen saying that the investigating officer is not allowing him to meet anyone.5 hours later, the raid that started at 12:30 pm is still on. @MehmoodPracha says the investigating officer isn’t allowing him to meet anyone. pic.twitter.com/UCBAOSy6IV— Fatima Khan (@khanthefatima) December 24, 2020 The Quint reported the contents of the warrant order, issued on December 22, as :”Whereas information has been laid before me of the commission of offences punishable under section 182, 193, 420, 468, 471, 472, 473, 120B and it has been made to appear to me that incriminating data comprising false complaint and meta data of outbox of email account which was used to send incriminating documents are essential to the investigation of FIR 212/20 of Police Station Special Cell, New Delhi.This is to authorize and require investigating officer of this case to search for the said incrementing documents and meta data of out of box of email ID, wherever they may be found whether in computer or in the office/premises of Sh Mehmood Pracha.”Pracha was the lawyer of Bhim Army chief Chandrashekhar Azad in the cases related to CAA protests. After hearing his arguments, a Delhi Court had granted Azad bail in cases related to Daryagunj violence during CAA protests last year after observing that reading of preamble to the Constitution does not amount to incitement to violence.Pracha had also appeared in a case in the Delhi High Court which challenged an instruction issued by the Delhi police to show restraint while arresting accused in Delhi riots case taking note of ‘resentment in Hindu Community’. The High Court refused to interfere with the instruction observing that it was issued after the petitioner was chargesheeted and hence no “prejudice was caused” to the accused. Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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In Brief

first_imgIn BriefOn 4 Jul 2000 in Personnel Today Mobile phone hang-up hits operators’ sharesLast week, the fly landed in the ointment for telecoms stocks when comments ascribed to Kurt Hellstrom, the boss of Swedish mobile phone giant Ericsson, caused significant damage to share prices of many companies in the sector. Hellstrom was reported to have said that mobile phone operators are likely to experience some difficulty as a result of the high prices they have paid for European third-generation licences. The FTSE 100, the UK index of leading stocks, saw red as prominent heavyweight stocks such as Vodafone AirTouch, Colt telecom, Cable & Wireless and Marconi took a serious beating late last week. Cable & Wireless recovered some lost ground on Friday. BT’s share price also came under a lot of pressure. Increasingly, market analysts are worried that many mobile phone companies will resort to increasing their debt in order to foot the bill for the new licences. Some also fear that liquidity problems could arise. Besides, there are worries too that vital new network projects could be starved of funds and that increased costs could then be pushed on to customers.Railtrack rallies at news of network investmentHowever, amidst the declining share prices, there was a little glimmer of hope for the FTSE. The index drew some comfort from Railtrack group, the rail operator, which saw its share price race ahead on Thursday. The sharp rise was attributed to unconfirmed reports that the Government is planning to develop parts of the rail network to cut freight on roads. There was speculation that the Government would soon announce a plan to spend billions on the rail project. Railtrack’s share price has endured some ups and downs but it is still a long way short of its best this year.Pearson acquisition heralds US diversificationPearson, the UK international media group, announced that it has acquired a controlling stake in Family Education Network (FEN), which is based in Boston in the US. The deal, which cost Pearson about $130m, will enable it to diversify into programming, network technology and content development and Pearson’s digital publishing arm Headland Digital Media will be admitted to the network. America Online (AOL) is a minority shareholder in FEN. M&Sclaims victory in first round of contract court battle Ailing retail group Marks & Spencer claimed last week that it has won the first round of the court battle launched by William Baird Textile Holdings, the supplier of clothing to M&S whose contract was terminated after three decades. William Baird wants substantial compensation for abrupt termination of its contract and the resulting damage to the company’s goodwill. M&S’s share price is still under immense pressure and the overwhelming view in the markets is that the company’s management is weak.last_img read more

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New model trainers

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. New model trainersOn 16 Apr 2002 in Personnel Today For too long training has been the Cinderella of HR, but that is set tochange. We profile some training and development directors who are showing theycan add value and credibility to their organisations. Nic Paton reportsAs training and development practitioners sit down to discuss the latestdevelopments in their profession at this week’s CIPD event they may well bepondering some recent statistics. A CIPD study published in March shows a substantial gap between training‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’. Employees working in smaller businesses, part-timersand those with fewer educational qualifications are less likely to receivetraining than those in large companies or the public sector. At the same time, the Industrial Society has found that, where proper coachingand mentoring of senior staff is carried out, most companies fail to evaluatethe results and do not have a coaching strategy or policy in place. And, despite the hype and excitement caused by the arrival of e-learning,coaching and mentoring, face-to-face learning and on-the-job training remain byfar the most popular methods, says the CIPD. How, then, should training and development professionals respond? Traininghas often been looked down on by managers as a cost that has to be toleratedand that, in harsher economic times, can be swiftly cut back upon. Similarly, acommon complaint among training and development professionals is that they areundervalued, under-paid in relation to their HR colleagues and under-recognisedfor the value they bring to a business. But it doesn’t have to be this way, argues Martyn Sloman, adviser ontraining and development at the CIPD, who has been involved with the professionsince 1985. “In the past, training and development has not been anexciting profession – it has often been considered a bit of a careerdead-end,” he agrees. “But we now have a unique window of opportunityto create new credibility and value.” In Sloman’s view there are two current pressures at work that have thepotential to move training and development up the agenda, if practitioners arewilling to grasp the opportunity. First, there is more emphasis than there has been on people as a resourcebeing a key driver of competitiveness. “Developing and managing people isarguably the only source of competitive advantage left to many companies,”says Sloman. The second pressure is the emergence of new technology, particularlye-learning and other training platforms. These have radically changed the wayorganisations can deliver and perceive training, says Sloman, offering cheaper,more accessible, more flexible learning. Yet there is also a danger of businesses and trainers being blinded by thetechnology and spending a fortune on something inappropriate. This isparticularly the case where organisations may have rushed in and boughtgeneric, off-the-shelf e-learning packages, he suggests. “In the past it was true that, as a trainer, you could just scootalong. Now it is about anticipating demands and being able to speak to themanagement. Trainers are also required to be less technical andjargon-free,” he says. As is apparent, both from Sloman and the training and development directorsprofiled below, trainers are reporting a significant shift in attitude towardslearning. The paternalistic approach – with training delivered centrally to theclassroom and workers simply taking the medicine – is giving way to a sensethat learners must take at least some responsibility for their learning. Programmes that encourage staff to sit down and work out what it is theywant, or need, to learn, rather than letting their line manager spoon-feedthem, are becoming more common. “It is a shift to a model centred around the learner,” saysSloman. “We are having to find out a huge amount about how people learn.”Similarly, successful training and development directors appear to have onething in common – a sharp and overriding sense of their organisation’s businessstrategy and where training and development fits into that mix. As Amber Moore, national training and development manager at law firm DLA,and a speaker at HRD 2002, puts it: “Training and development managershave got to be chameleons. You have to adapt your personal style to match theindividual’s. You have to be a sales person, financier and diplomat. But mostof all you have to link your strategy to the business. “If you want to be seen as one of the most important parts of thebusiness, then you need to get out there and make sure you deliver.” Alison Winch Director of learning and development, Interbrew Good training and development practitioners, argues Alison Winch, directorof learning and development at Interbrew, need to have a real openness and anability to connect with the business and those within it. “Often when a person comes to you who is struggling with their team,they have done everything they can to make it work. To come to you, with allthe politics that might entail, takes quite a lot,” she says. Belgian-owned Interbrew is one of the world’s oldest beer companies and ismost famous for its Stella Artois brand. It has a presence in 17 countries andin the UK the business is split into eight areas: head office; marketing;selling to pubs, bars and hotels; selling to off-licences and supermarkets;customer services; call centres; servicing; and logistics. In the UKthe companyemploys some 5,000 people at 20 sites, including around 1,000 managers. Winch, 39, has been director of learning and development since 1998, havingworked at Whitbread, Marriott and Travel Inn. She was also HR director at TGIFridays for seven years and recently completed a masters degree in learning anddevelopment. While reluctant to divulge a figure, she describes herself as “verywell paid”, adding: “My performance is very much linked to companyprofitability. More than 40 per cent of my salary is on bonus.” There is a small central learning and development team, consisting of herplus two others. This is complemented by teams in each business unit focusingon technical training needs, such as brewing and supply chain management,forklift truck driving and so on. The main challenge, she says, “is putting people in a room, having aconversation with them and taking them somewhere new – getting people to buyinto something, before they know what it is”. For instance, two years ago Winch began developing an innovative nine-monthmanagement action learning programme that saw candidates choosing what theywanted to learn and being coached and evaluated by senior people throughout.The first 11 people from this scheme graduated last month. “The board had to take a blind leap of faith. We were talking aboutsomething they did not understand and would not understand until they hadcompleted it.” Nevertheless, there are problems to contend with. Winch cites impatience atgetting people to understand where she wants to take them, and people notmoving as fast as she would like. Another barrier, ironically, is when a business is successful. A sense of ‘ifit ain’t broke don’t fix it’ can be hard to change even if it is obvious thatchanges need to be made for that success to be sustained. She adds: “I am a woman in a very male-orientated business. There arewomen in the middle manager ranks, but certainly at senior level there is onlyme. So when you are trying to bring in something different, and you aredifferent, it is easier to be rejected. I have had to work hard to get beyondthat and I feel I have done that.” Despite this, she says Interbrew is the kind of company where, if you knowwhat you want to do and how to do it, you can do anything you want – and sinceJanuary, she has been running leadership courses for managers using horses, aconcept she has worked on for the past five years. Candidates are tasked to lead a horse around an arena without using ropes,bridles or other control devices, for example. “It really shows people up.They have to find something within themselves that will make the horse followthem,” she says. So far, about 25 managers have been through it, with 75lined up. Winch has started a doctorate in equine-based coaching and hopes to strikeout as a leadership guru in the future, promoting the idea of training withhorses. “I engage my whole self in it – this is my purpose, my passion, mylife. The only downside, is asking ‘why am I forcing myself through this?’ whenyou are trying to lead people through a new thing. The worst part is what weface in ourselves.” “What I am most proud of is that learning and development at Interbrewhas changed from being something you did on a wet weekend in January tosomething that is integral to what people want.” Alison Winch is speaking at the HRD seminar: How e-learners learn.Tuesday 16 April (a5) 11.00-12.15 Bob NelsonController of training and development, BBCWith 350 staff in seven locations, aturnover of £40m and some 28,000 employees to train, Bob Nelson’s role is aboutas big as it gets for a training and development specialist. Nelson, 52, iscontroller of development and training at the BBC, now one of the world’slargest trainers in audio and visual skills.As well as meeting internal training needs, Nelson and his teamoperate training schools overseas and run skills development courses for manycharitable organisations around the world.Nelson has been with the corporation for 14 years, five of themas controller. In March this year, he was awarded a lifetime achievement awardby Skillset, the best practice training body. His salary, between £120,000 and£140,000, reflects the prominence of his role at the organisation.”It is a long time since I have stood up and run atraining course, to be honest. My role is mostly about strategy, leadership,budgeting and setting out staff and finance issues. It’s about working out howto get the money for the things we need to do. In many ways, it is much more ofa general manager’s role,” he explains.Nelson has a degree in politics and economics and a Mastersdegree in occupational psychology. Before the BBC he worked at BA, helping tooversee the large culture change programme put in place by then chief executiveColin Marshall.A good training and development specialist must be persuasiveand authoritative, he argues: “You need to cause other people to do whatyou want them to do without them realising that you want them to do it. Youneed to make a real connection to the business,” he says. “There isabsolutely no point in turning out fantastic training if it is irrelevant tothe business.”One of the main challenges is ensuring the skills being taughtproduce real competitive advantage, he argues. Being seen to be attuned to theneeds of the business may also help protect the department in a downturn.His main headache is getting people to realise that training isnot something they should do when all other avenues have been explored.”Training is one of those things that people put off. It is just fightingagainst that.”And when an organisation such as the BBC is staffed withintelligent, creative, independently minded people, convincing them they needtraining can be tricky. “There is sometimes a sense of ‘I didn’t get whereI am today by going on a training course’,” he says. The job, then, isvery much about hammering home the message that training is not a chore butsomething that will actually benefit them.Other irritants include the fact that, at this level, Nelsonoften finds himself chained to his desk dealing with e-mails – he receivesabout 60 a day – and other correspondence, rather than being out in the fieldpushing forward the training agenda.But there are also many highs. Nelson cites in particular onetraining initiative, through the BBC’s non profit-making World Service Trust,in India that was designed to tackle the stigma of leprosy. The team puttogether an EastEnders-style soap that succeeded radically in changing people’sperceptions.Nelson is encouraged to develop his own skills too. Six yearsago he went on a six-week general management programme and a few weeks ago heupdated his keyboard skills. He hopes the future holds an HR director role in aplc or a more specialised training and development role.Managers are increasingly realising that share options, fancytitles and bonuses can only go so far in motivating people, he argues. Trainingand development, if handled well, can help drive the business too.Soon after he started, for instance, Nelson was tasked by thendirector general John Birt to, as he puts it, “pump the organisation fullof digital skills”. Fine in principle, but this was before the resourcesor capability to go digital were even in place. In effect, Birt was adopting abottom-up approach.”We were giving people the skills before the demand wasthere,” he says. “But once we had put the skills in, it dragged inthe demand. We were using training to drag up demand for those skills.”SarahSimpsonDirector, training and resources, Suzy Lamplugh TrustIt was while teaching a TEFL(Teaching English as a Foreign Language) course in the early 1970s that SarahSimpson hit on what is her overriding mantra for training and development.”I learnt that if you are talking, then your students arenot,” says Simpson, director of training and resources at the SuzyLamplugh Trust. “If you contribute you feel more valued and you learn morebecause if you are speaking you have to think about it.”Simpson, 55, started off her career in retail management beforemoving into the charity field with the YMCA. She has been with the SuzyLamplugh Trust since 1993, founding the trust’s training department.The trust is the national charity for personal safety, createdin the wake of the death of Suzy Lamplugh, the estate agent who disappearedafter going to meet a ‘Mr Kipper’ to view a house.Unusually for a training director, Simpson’s responsibility isfocused less on the training needs of her staff – who are mostly administrators– and more on external training provision. Despite being a charity, the trustis now the UK’s largest provider of personal safety training.The charity has more than 600 ‘tutors’ dotted around thecountry, aged between 17 and 80, who have been trained by the trust but notactually employed by it. Tutors are regularly updated and trained in the latestpersonal safety information or techniques, but spend most of their time out inthe field.There are a further 23 self-employed trainers who work with thetrust delivering training in the workplace, offering courses ranging frombetween two and 10 hours. The training of tutors is carried out by othertutors. All courses are customised to the specific needs of the organisationbeing visited. Some 600 training events were held last year.Simpson declines to reveal her salary, but does admit it is”very low” and that her trainers generally earn more than she does,as the trust has to remain commercially competitive to retain good trainers.Good training and development directors need to havecreativity, flexibility, energy, enthusiasm, self-belief and, critically, anability to listen and be receptive to ideas, she argues.Her main responsibilities lie in directing the futuredevelopment and training needs of trainers and tutors, dealing with conferencesand looking at where training opportunities are likely to develop. For instance, since 11 September, many organisations havestrengthened their security. This has led to more work being carried out on howto respond to aggression in the workplace, either from customers, passengers,colleagues or, even security guards.The main challenge of working in this environment is trying toensure the training that is delivered is backed up by the organisation.”Staff often think they are going on a training course, but the managementis only paying lipservice to it,” she says. “Unless the management isthere listening, there is a sense that things are not going to change. Thereneeds to be a recognition that they themselves need to change their behaviour.”People are often also unwilling to admit to incidents for fearof being seen as unprofessional, an issue that must be addressed by thetrainer, she adds.The trust is currently working with call centre staff helpingthem manage stress caused by aggressive or hostile callers. Firms areencouraged to set up ‘destressing’ rooms where staff can go to bash cushionswith wooden spoons or a ‘stress drawer’ full of chocolate treats. Often thesimple fact of having a separate area, signalling a recognition that stress isa problem, helps immensely, says Simpson.The best element of the job for Simpson is the opportunitiesshe sees for progress every time she steps into the office. The downside, sheadds, is achieving all the things she wants to on a limited budget.She is particularly proud of a series of conferences she helpedorganise with local education authorities for their teaching and sitesupervisory staff this year. “The value of coming in from the outside and working withpeople that perhaps knew each other but had never shared their interests orpractices together was great – it was a chance for people to get recognitionfrom their authority,” she says.Sarah Simpson is speaking at theHRD seminar: Dealing with aggression in the workplace. Wednesday 17 April (b8)13.45-15.00Elaine MooreTraining and development director, NOP Research GroupElaine Moore has been with researchorganisation NOP for the past 10 years, shifting from a research role totraining and development. She took up her current role of training anddevelopment director four years ago. The team consists of her, one permanent ITtrainer and two training co-ordinators.The training is split into six distinct programmes: IT, marketresearch, technical skills, general business skills, coaching and mentoring. Ofthese, technical skills training is perceived as being the core skill employeesmust have.The company, founded in 1957, employs 600 people in the UK andhas offices in London, Oxford, Barking, Luton and Chelmsford.Moore’s key responsibility is putting in place a targetedprogramme of training and development that links closely with business needsand objectives. “A lot of people are now much more concerned with taking astrategic approach to training and development. Clients expect to seeimprovements in efficiency and productivity all the time, and, quite rightly,they should be able to see that in training and development too,” she says.Training at NOP is split between classroom-based study andPC-based learning, with trainers generally working with small groups. “Alot more of our training is interactive. There is nothing more tedious thanlistening to a lot of presentations,” she says. Coaching and mentoring isdone on a one-to-one basis.A key challenge is trying to keep information and trainingfresh. “How do you collect the appropriate information and disseminate itwithout being bureaucratic? How do you collect histories, evidence, make ituseful and avoid endless forms?” she asks. It certainly helps if training and development is championed ata senior level within the organisation, something that has always been the caseat NOP. “We are beginning to move from a passive approach – where peoplewait to be found a course – to a more proactive stance,” she adds.For the past nine months, for instance, NOP has been testingthe viability of making coaching courses for new managers in the businessresearch division mandatory.The best part of the job for Moore is the fact she gets tothink strategically. “It’s about designing the next training programme soit links to where the business is going,” she explains. “It’s aboutbridging the gap wherever possible.”A constant bugbear is that market researchers as a breed tendto value their individuality and ability to think freely, meaning the deliveryof any training has to be carefully pitched so as not to create hostility.”They can resent the notion they should be having classes in what managersshould be like. In the past we have put managers through ‘sheep-dip learning’programmes or have given them a random array of courses and workshops that havebeen incoherent, or not given them enough information,” she admits candidly.Successful learning, in this context, is therefore very muchabout allowing the trainee to set their own goals and looking closely at how,or indeed if, the learning will be remembered and applied back in the workplace.”People find it hard to diagnose their development needs –you often do not realise your management skills are poor. So you need to designmanagement development programmes that address those obstacles,” sheargues.Moore, for instance, developed and instigated a managementself-learning programme, something she is justly proud of. Participants were asked to draw up a personal learning contractwith their line manager, setting out, through 360-degree feedback, learning.The managers were then split into learning groups of betweensix to eight people, meeting six to eight times over a nine-month period,overseen by a group adviser. At the end of the programme, each learning grouppresented what they had learnt to an audience of senior managers and board members.As to the future, Moore sees her role as helping to push thebusiness forward so it is offering clients a greater range of services –particularly more consultancy-type services rather than just dry intelligenceor statistics. While she concedes training and development is not, and neverwill be, a core business in any organisation, it is gaining ground. “Themore businesses have to cope with change, the more they need training anddevelopment programmes. Whatever happens, training and development is going tobe increasing in importance in the workplace,” she asserts. Elaine Moore is speaking at theHRD seminar: Developing senior managers Wednesday 17 April. (b12) 15.30-16.30GrahamPeekeDirector of professional and organisational development, Learning andSkills Development AgencyTraining and development has oftenbeen undervalued and is frequently one of the first things to go in times ofeconomic difficulty. “You have to push the economic and the business casefor it.”So says Graham Peeke, director of professional andorganisational development at the Learning and Skills Development Agency(LSDA). He should know. A number of years back the agency, then called theFurther Education Development Agency, was strongly criticised over itsperformance by the Parliamentary select committee on education.Now, however, it has turned its reputation around withinGovernment circles and in the further education sector as a whole. It has areputation as a body that adds value when it comes to training and developmentand which can put policy into practice, Peeke adds.The agency was renamed in November 2000. It provides trainingand runs conferences for further education personnel and co-ordinates researchand development projects. It is also the largest UK provider of training forgovernors, managers and practitioners in the further education sector, runningresidential courses, one-day courses and networking events.Peeke, 50, spent 23 years in the further education sector,working in colleges first as a lecturer and subsequently in a number ofmanagement roles. He joined the LSDA in 1997, moving to his current job in 1999.He oversees three teams covering professional development,quality improvement and the agency’s regional directors. Within the eight-strong professional development team, Peeke isresponsible for ensuring the delivery of programmes in areas such asleadership, governance and management development. Courses are generally aimedat college principals or middle managers.The quality improvement team, of about eight full-time staff,involves itself in large training contracts, mostly but not solely withGovernment, for improving the quality of adult learning.The agency has eight regional directors who are in contact withcolleges around the UK – a valuable source of intelligence. Training anddevelopment issues here include working with players such as the regionaldevelopment agencies, he says.Peeke’s role is largely one of overseeing management, budgetingand staffing issues surrounding training and development. “There is aleadership element to it. What are the key issues we are facing, where are wegoing, are we contributing to the corporate direction of the agency?” hesays.A major challenge, as he sees it, is that, inevitably in such asector, many of the projects or events that the agency is involved with arequite high profile so that, when they do go wrong, it can be a major headache.Another key challenge is securing contracts to make sure thebusiness continues to function. The agency gets a core grant of £4m from theGovernment but has a turnover of £25m. It gets the rest through competitivetendering of contracts, primarily with Government but also elsewhere.The best part of the job for him is its variety, fromspeech-making and writing to co-ordinating with other national bodies, he says.”You have a chance in a national organisation like this to influencepolicy. You are in a position to have some influence on what is going on indifferent organisations throughout the sector,” he explains.When it comes to his personal training and development, theagency holds ‘learning days’ every couple of months where staff can share bestpractice and ideas, look at key problems, solutions and policy initiativesacross the agency. There are also many informal learning opportunities, atconferences or through meeting other organisations as well as on-the-joblearning, stresses Peeke.He is proud of the shift in attitude he has brought about atthe agency, particularly towards professional development. Before he arrivedthere was a relatively small number of training programmes in this area and theagency had to spend a lot of time chasing customers because this part of theoperation was not centrally funded.Now, working with the Government, the agency has repositioneditself on how it identifies development needs. The funding has been put on acentral footing so it can be more strategic in its thinking, going direct toorganisations to address their needs. It has also worked to develop partnershipwith consultancies.”We have worked hard to reposition ourselves in the eyesof the Government as a body that is really good at translating policy intopractice,” he says.”Investing in training and development can really benefitbusiness. The number of people who are only responsible for training anddevelopment is shrinking – they are now more likely taking responsibility forthe whole HR area and quality improvement,” he adds.RayCampsieSenior executive responsible for group training and managementdevelopment, HSBCWithout active and enthusiasticsupport from the management executive, a training and development directorfaces an almost impossible task. Ray Campsie, the senior executive responsiblefor group training and management development at banking giant HSBC, countshimself lucky for the level of support he has from senior management.”These are people who have literally changed their diariesto take part in training and development activities. If you do not have thatsort of support, do not bother,” he says, citing the example of a recentcourse where the group chairman came down to give a briefing. HSBC spends some £90m a year on training, averaging out atabout £500 per person a year, or four to five days’ training each.Campsie, 54, joined the bank – then the Hong Kong Bank – in1986, having previously been head of UK management development in the waterindustry. He took on his current ‘concept’, as he calls it, in 1993.He is responsible for the overall quality and frequency oftraining for HSBC’s 173,000 employees worldwide. The bank has 7,000 offices in81 countries.The training and development function has a core central staffof about 20 trainers, complemented by training and development teams located inthe 15 business units. These may have as many as 400 people or as few as nineand report directly to group training officers, with ‘a dotted line’ leading toCampsie.The majority of HSBC’s training is split into two areas: specialisedfunctional training and general management training. At this level, inevitably,Campsie has moved on from a hands-on training role. “I do none whatsoever– I have been banished,” he jokes.Instead, his role is largely about strategic planning. He takesresponsibility for any relevant initiatives that come down from the seniormanagement team and has specific responsibility for the bank’s graduate intake.This year HSBC is expected to recruit some 250 graduates to its commercial bankand between 70 to 100 on the investment banking side.His is not a board-level position and he reports to the groupgeneral manager of HR. He declines to go public on his salary, simply saying”it is the norm” for his level in his sector.The key challenge, he argues, is much the same as that faced byany training and development director. “It’s about getting more with less.More with less money and less people. It’s about trying to get a global reachto ensure people network and communicate across their natural boundaries andgeographical functions,” he says.One of the key drivers of this process has been the war fortalent, a war that has been particularly acute in the banking sector. All thebig banks have had to take a hard look at how they retain and motivate theirstaff, and training and development, as a result, has moved rapidly up theagenda. “The war for talent is not just about those with highpotential. You cannot just create an elite and focus on them, you still have aresponsibility for the other 99.9 per cent who run the organisation,” heexplains.In an organisation of this size, a major headache is simplyensuring his message keeps getting home, says Campsie. Then there is theongoing debate about how training should be best delivered. HSBC has taken a conscious decision not to, as Campsie puts it,”spend bucket-loads on e-learning”. Subsequently, most of the group’straining still takes place face-to-face. There is also a debate over how muchshould be bought in from outside and how much kept in-house.Campsie himself recently attended a three-day conference inBrussels on leadership development. Otherwise, most of his own training anddevelopment comes from relevant journals and others in the industry.Three years ago, HSBC launched a five-year strategy. As part ofthis, Campsie helped organise a two-day worldwide seminar. “Thecommunication and preparation for that was fun afterwards, but not at thetime,” he laughs.More recently, he has been instrumental in putting in place a‘collective management’ project, bringing together groups of 12 people fromfunctions across the world. The 12 take part in a three-day intensiveprogramme, including meeting a range of senior management, undertakingprojects, forming business learning groups and running simulations to emphasisethe benefits of collective working. So far more than 50 managers have beenthrough it.Effective training and development, he argues, is “acombination of coaching, counselling and consulting skills” as well ashaving the vision to see what the real needs of an organisation are. “You must either get involved in the business, or get out.You are either a business partner or you are not. If you cannot provenumerically or emotionally that you add value then you do not deserve to bepart of the game,” he explains.AmberMooreNational training and development manager, DLAGetting training and developmentright is not rocket science, insists Amber Moore, national training anddevelopment manager at law firm DLA. “The business practices and the basicprinciples are the same irrespective of what sphere you are working in,”she says.She identifies four key elements: setting a strategy that linksin with the business, budgeting it sensibly, integrating it within the businessand, crucially, delivering on your promises.”I think to a certain extent people in the training anddevelopment function have to be proactive in changing perceptions of them. Youcannot afford to sit back and say I am undervalued or underpaid,” she adds.This is particularly the case in the legal profession, not asector known for its indulgence of under performers. But Moore, 33, has neverbeen one to shy away from challenges. After graduating in French and GreekStudies from Keele, she found herself managing 300 shift workers on theshopfloor in a manufacturing plant. “I was responsible for making sure thework continued smoothly, because if they stopped they did not get paid,”she laughs.After that daunting experience, she went back to college tolearn IT skills and ended up at a company called Central Law Training, buildingup the company’s legal training department.Head hunted twice, she eventually landed at DLA in 1998, firstas training and development manager, then as national training and developmentmanager. She is, she adds, “very well paid for what I do” butdeclines to name a figure.Unusually for a law firm, training and development at DLA isintrinsically intertwined with the HR function. She reports to the HR directorand is one of four national managers. Her team consists of five people: threesenior officers and two training and development officers.Her role is to design, with the HR department, the wholetraining and development strategy for the firm and implement it among DLR’s2,616 staff, including 303 partners. The way she has done this, she explains, is to take an holisticapproach to training and development. “Training is often seen as very mucha pill to be taken to cure an ailment. But I had a fantastic opportunity tolook at having an HR and training and development strategy that was integratedinto the business strategy.”Moore developed a curriculum-based approach. She consulted witheveryone in the practice and put together a curriculum pack for each individualmember of staff outlining their training and development needs, competencies,and career development plans.The biggest challenge was in changing behaviour, she argues.”You cannot approach something like this overnight. It took a tremendousamount of hard work, having to demonstrate on a constant basis the value of it.”The skills and management pack was launched at the end of 2000and this May will be extended to the fee earners – the solicitors – within thebusiness, who up until now have only had a pack devoted to IT training. Moore is working on developing the company’s three-yearstrategy to make it one of the top five law firms in Europe. “The nextchallenge is to take the model we have into Europe and make it fit thepractices there.”Unsurprisingly, she has access to the curriculum herself and,indeed, often pilots some of the courses on offer. She is also doing apostgraduate diploma in HR development at the University of Manchester BusinessSchool.For Moore, the worst part of the job is the need to constantlybe re-evaluating what she does and how she does it. “You can never affordto sit back and relax and say that is it,” she says. “It isexhausting.”At the same time, worst can also be best. “When you areable to deliver on something that you can actually see and make a difference,it is hugely rewarding. When people who have been sceptical and cynical come upto you and say ‘that really worked’, you get a real buzz,” she enthuses,adding: “Lawyers are not generally very liberal with their praise.”AmberMoore is speaking at the HRD seminar: Learning Strategies that work. Thursday18 April 13.45-15.00               Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Case round-up

first_img Previous Article Next Article This week’s case round-upCareer break scheme broke continuity of employment Curr v Marks & Spencer plc, Court of Appeal, 13 Dec 2002, All ER (D)205 Cheryl Curr joined Marks & Spencer in 1973. In 1989, during maternityleave, she decided to take part in her employer’s new career break scheme. Thescheme, which was unpaid, required Curr to resign but guaranteed her amanagement post if she wished to return at the end of the break. Following a four-year break, Curr returned to work in 1994. In 1999 Curr wasmade redundant and her redundancy payment was calculated based on continuousemployment from 1994. Curr brought a tribunal complaint arguing her redundancypayment should have been calculated on the basis of continuous employment from1973 rather than the return from her career break. The tribunal dismissed her complaint, but the EAT held the scheme amountedto an arrangement under the Employment Rights Act 1996 (s212(3)) and foundCurr’s continuity was preserved from 1973 onwards. (Section 212(3)c providesthat where an employee is absent from work in circumstances in which, byarrangement or custom, he is regarded as continuing in employ-ment for anypurpose, continuity will be preserved, even though no contract of employment isin existence). The Court of Appeal disagreed. For the scheme to be an ‘arrangement’ therehad to be mutual recognition by the parties that, despite Curr’s absence fromwork, she nevertheless continued in M&S’ employment. This was not the case.Curr had clearly resigned and the scheme offered future re-employ-ment whichdemonstrated that she was not regarded as continuing in employment.Accordingly, Curr was not entitled to a redundancy payment based on her serviceprior to or during her career break. Holiday pay for ‘self-employed’ joiner Torith Ltd v Flynn, EAT, 21 November 2002, EAT website,16 Dec 2002 Flynn undertook work as a joiner for Torith, a firm of building contractors.Throughout his engagement, he was registered as self-employed for tax purposesand was perceived that way by the firm. When Flynn’s engagement came to an end he brought a tribunal claim forholiday pay under the Working Time Regulations 1998. The regulations provide that a ‘worker’ includes “an individual whounder-takes to do or perform personally any work or services for another partyto the contract whose status is not, by virtue of the contract, that of aclient or a customer of any profession or business undertaking carried on bythe individual”. The tribunal conducted a careful review of the working arrangements betweenFlynn and Torith, arriving at a number of findings of fact. In line with thecase of Byrne Brothers (Formwork) Ltd v Baird and others, 2002, IRLR 96, thetribunal found that Flynn was a “worker” under the regulations.Torith’s appeal was unsuccessful. The EAT commented that the regulations appeared to create a hybrid categoryof protected persons somewhere between employees and the genuinelyself-employed. The chairman was correct to approach the definition of ‘worker’ by firstlyassessing the factors surrounding Flynn’s engagement much as he would have donein determining a contract of service from a contract for services. Having established that in Flynn’s case these factors weighed more towardsemployment status than self-employed status, the decision that he properly fellwithin the category of ‘worker’ was a reasonable one. Related posts:No related photos. Case round-upOn 21 Jan 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. last_img read more

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