NORTHERN MICHIGAN: Diocese finds its voice

first_imgNORTHERN MICHIGAN: Diocese finds its voice Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Hiawathaland/ Episcopal News Service] Access to health and dental care, elder care and educating young people topped the discussion during “Finding our Voice,” a one-day conference on issues affecting residents of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula held at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Marquette in mid-September.Sponsored by the Diocese of Northern Michigan’s Peace and Justice Committee, the fifth annual conference aimed at an interfaith discussion on religion and politics was intended to help set the agenda for further action in the year ahead. More than sixty people, including state legislators and philanthropic leaders, gathered to explore the issues, advocacy and action“The very fact that people of different religions and different parties can get together and civilly discuss issues that affect everyone is part of the huge piece that we hope to continue,” said Jean Mather, a member of the Peace and Justice Committee and of St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Manistique, in a telephone interview with ENS. “Each person from the Episcopal Church is going to go back to their congregation and spread the word and help in clarifying issues before elections — who stands where on what.”One of the primary ways that the Episcopal Church in Northern Michigan, which includes 25 congregations, lives out the fourth of the Five Marks of Mission (seeking to transform unjust structures in society) is by hosting conferences that encourage advocacy and action of its members as citizens.“Finding Our Voice” gathered people from different faith traditions and political persuasion to have a conversation.  “The hope of the justice and peace committee of the diocese was to raise the awareness of issues that are dear to our hearts. … The goal was to gather a common vision that did not separate humanity into factions, but to seek to transform the unjust structures of society. Participants had the opportunity to explore what they could do to take positive action, and our diocese will continue that conversation at our diocesan convention in October,” said Bishop Rayford Ray in an e-mail message to ENS.With 300,000 people spread out over more than 16,000 square miles, it is often difficult for residents living in rural areas to access resources. And even where present, obstacles persist.For example, Mather explained that some dental clinics will only see one patient from a family at a time, meaning if three children from the same family all need dental care, they cannot see a dentist on the same day. The clinics can be a long drive away, making it hard for families to get there; which has led to the clinics, in fear of more one cancellation, to make the rule.The themes for this year’s conference came directly from the communities, said Dennis West, a member of the Peace and Justice Committee and the president of Northern Initiatives, a private, nonprofit community development corporation that provides rural entrepreneurs with access to capital, information and markets.In a telephone interview with ENS, West explained that the conference’s workshops were designed to educate the attendees on all dimensions of the issues, to understand data needs and limitations, and to go beyond education into action.Michigan Democratic Senators Carl Levin and Debbie Stabenow each sent video messages of encouragement to the more than 60 people gathered at St. Paul’s. Levin reminded those gathered that in the same way that the nation came together in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, people need to come together today in the name of seeking justice.  Stabenow reflected on the good work that many people are already doing, working together, and shared that she keeps a reminder quote from Helen Keller on her refrigerator:  “I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something;  and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.”Rob Collier, president and CEO of the Council of Michigan Foundations, offered stories and inspiration for people seeking to make a difference in their community.“We tell stories to one another to teach, persuade, and understand our life and context,” he said.Collier shared stories of the impact of giving in the state of Michigan, and the importance of helping people to understand that they can make a difference.“We want to include and involve everyone,” he said.  He especially emphasized the philanthropic impact of youth; each year youth in Michigan raise and give $2.5 million. “We need to involve youth in the conversation and decision-making about their Michigan.”Collier went on to share stories of creative and innovative partnerships that are reshaping the response to needs in our state, such as the Double Up program that helps people receiving state food assistance to make use of farmers markets for produce, and a partnership that is helping families save for home ownership in a way that helps to make them successful home owners long term.Leaders from Jewish, Christian, and Unitarian Universalist backgrounds shared their experience with issues of health care, education and end-of-life care.  They told stories of people forced to make choices about whether their child was sick enough to go to the emergency room when they had no medical insurance, of the ethical choices that our medical system presents as people decide whether the medical care adds to the quality of life or merely prolongs it and of how their faith tradition helps them make decisions when faced with challenging issues.Harvey Wallace, interim dean of the College of Professional Studies at Northern Michigan University, and speaking from a Jewish faith tradition, said “Does Jewish law mandate universal health care?  There are many different answers, but I think yes. We have an obligation to care for others with whom we live…there is a passage in Exodus that reminds us to be ‘kind to the stranger, for we were strangers in a strange land.’”Lutheran Bishop Tom Skrenes and retired Lutheran Advocacy Director Ben Baldus reminded listeners to broaden the circle of care to include all in need: elderly, children, immigrants, and prison populations.A panel on legislative issues addressed the challenges of health care, dental care, education and end-of-life care.  State Representatives Ed McBroom (R) and Steve Lindberg (D) shared personal stories of family health care. Both representatives affirmed the importance of working across the political aisle to work on solving the issues, especially health care, before us.“We should be having conversations just like this, all across the country.  Sharing our ideas across the political spectrum so that we can be heard and find solutions to the problems that we face as a country,” said Dr. Richard Armstrong of Newberry, a local chapter president the conservative, national organization the Docs4Patient Care.— Rïse Thew Forrester is Northern Michigan’s ministry developer, and editor of The Church in Hiawathaland. Lynette Wilson, editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service, contributed to this story. 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Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Rïse Thew Forrester Posted Oct 9, 2012 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska October 9, 2012 at 1:33 pm MINISTRY IN ACTION. Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

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FSL brings Movember to TCU

first_img Previous articleTexas Secretary of State speaks to students about votingNext articleFogelson Honors Forum speaker warns of dangers facing education system Ernest Dominick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Frogs for the Cure celebrate recent success Facebook ReddIt ReddIt Market Square makes changes in response to student complaints The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years Twitter Ernest Dominickhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ernest-dominick/ Fort Worth Botanic Garden holds grand opening for butterfly exhibit Facebook Ernest Dominickhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ernest-dominick/ Twittercenter_img Linkedin TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Ernest Dominickhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ernest-dominick/ Ernest Dominick is a journalism major with a minor in general business. He is from Marksville, Louisiana but has been based in Dallas since 2006. He is currently serving as a reporter for Greek Life at TCU. printOne in seven men will get diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime, but fraternities at TCU want to do their part in helping prevent this disease through the Movember movement.Movember is a monthlong fundraising campaign that aims to bring awareness to men’s health issues like prostate cancer and physical inactivity. The campus campaign will start Nov. 1.Fraternity members will show support and advertise for the campaign by growing moustaches throughout the month of November.“I was hooked from the beginning,” said MacGregor Hall, the Interfraternity Council vice president of philanthropy and service. “I thought it was awesome, a great cause, and something that I feel a lot of people could get on board with.”IFC adviser Evan Konecky presented the idea to the IFC executive board and received resounding support.“When the idea was proposed to the IFC exec board, they unanimously decided to bring it to TCU,” Movember adviser Melissa Smithey said.TCU is competing with Baylor University’s Movember campaign.“On the Nov. 27 game, we’re going to announce who raised the most money out of Baylor and TCU,” Smithey said.Movember creator Adam Garone cites the campaign as the biggest funder of prostate cancer research and support in the world, raising more than $650 million and helping fund more than 1,000 men’s health programs in 21 countries.Movember at TCU will host a variety of events:Shave the DateMOVE Community Service“Check Yourself” days at the TCU Health CenterCounseling Center eventCampus Recreation center competitionsMovember Moustache tailgate“Seeing people grow funny moustaches will bring people together and raise awareness,” Kappa Sigma President Stephen Levy said.However, there are more ways to give back to Movember other than growing a mustache. Smithey said there are three aspects to the campaign.“Grow: if you are a male, you can grow your mustache,” Smithey said. “Give: giving towards Movember’s philanthropy efforts, and move: men’s and women’s health programs promoting active lifestyle.”Konecky said this campaign is important to the campus because college men are the most susceptible to prostate cancer.“The target age is from ages 18-35,” Konecky said.Konecky also said he wants to increase proactive health screenings in college men.“My goal is to get more men to go to the Counseling Center and TCU Health Center to get checked for prostate cancer,” Konecky said. “I want to break the stigma around seeking mental and physical health.”All TCU students are encouraged to create a profile on http://movember.com and sign up under the TCU network to make it easier to keep track of money raised from the university. Linkedin TCU Frog Camps returning to more traditional look this summer Ernest Dominick + posts Botanic Garden to host 8th bi-annual butterfly exhibit Ernest Dominickhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/ernest-dominick/last_img read more

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Student forms mentoring group to help high school students prepare for college

first_imgFacebook Twitter Linkedin Linkedin TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history + posts ReddIt Macy is a junior Journalism major from Lubbock, Texas. World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution TCU’s Elite Dance Team is heading to USA Nationals TCU adds new Eventing Club Sportcenter_img Twitter Macy Yates printBalancing dual-credit classes, preparing for the SAT and studying for upcoming subject tests are all things high school students at O.D. Wyatt High School stress about as they inch closer to graduation. However, sophomore Josiah Snowden has started a mentoring and tutoring program to help make these things a little bit easier for them.Snowden said one of his main goals was to bring TCU students and the Fort Worth community together.“I thought it was a great opportunity to have a two-way street of TCU going and teaching others, but then having the Fort Worth community teach TCU students,” he said. “I really wanted it to be a two-way street with both sides having something to give.”Snowden said he’s always liked interacting with people from all different walks of life.“I think it is always great when you bring in people with different backgrounds and make everyone the best type of person they can be because everyone has so much to offer,” Snowden said.O.D. Wyatt Assistant Principal Godswill Barrah said the administrators at O.D Wyatt were excited about this mentoring group because it was a partnership and support group that was much needed.“It is one thing for us to tell our kids what it’s like to go to college, but it’s a different thing for someone who is currently in college to sit down with a student in an ongoing process, not just a one-time thing,” he said.A student at O.D. Wyatt says the lesson plans through the program has helped her academically.Simple Lesson PlanVenngage Infographics“I have been noticing that I have been understanding my work better and that is because of y’all,” the student said. “In the class, I mostly struggle with, some of y’all’s members have really helped me understand physics. They show me examples and do anything to help me.”Snowden said this group is something he hopes will be ongoing even after he graduates.“I really want it to be a long program with no definite end in sight to just keep bringing in people with new ideas that actually care about what the program does and what it has to offer so that it can keep contributing and growing it in whatever ways they see best,” he said. Facebook ReddIt Macy Yateshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/macy-yates/ Macy Yateshttps://www.tcu360.com/author/macy-yates/ Previous articleClub tennis team to compete for a national championshipNext articleParking lot behind Moudy closes for construction, new lot opens on Princeton Ave Macy Yates RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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Journalist critical after shooting on Mindanao Island

first_imgNews May 3, 2021 Find out more RSF_en October 5, 2005 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist critical after shooting on Mindanao Island Organisation Philippines: RSF and the #HoldTheLine Coalition welcome reprieve for Maria Ressa, demand all other charges and cases be dropped News PhilippinesAsia – Pacific PhilippinesAsia – Pacific Receive email alerts February 16, 2021 Find out morecenter_img News June 1, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders expressed deep concern about a murder attempt against journalist Danilo Aguirre who was critically ill in hospital after being shot in the stomach by a hit-man in General Santos, on Mindanao Island in southern Philippines. Aguirre, aged 25, of the Mindanao Bulletin where he also works on marketing, joined the regional weekly in June this year. He was on his way to the newspaper’s offices on 4 October with photographer, Emmanuel Zaldivar.Zaldivar spotted the gunman, who was wearing a ski mask, and a motorcycle helmet, and managed to push the journalist, who had his back turned. Despite this he was hit in the abdomen with a 45 calibre bullet. The gunman tried to take another shot at the two journalists but his gun jammed and he fled. Zaldivar, in a state of shock, said the attacker had seemed determined to kill them.“Police, who have just had positive results in two other cases in which journalists were murdered, should now do their utmost to discover the motives and identity of whoever hired the hit-man,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said.In a report of an investigation released in May 2005, Reporters Without Borders said of The Philippines: “The culture of violence cannot explain everything. There is a culture of impunity, for which the country’s highest authorities have a responsibility, that has allowed killers and those who hire them to murder so many journalists throughout the country”. Six journalists have already been killed in 2005 and as many have been the target of murder attempts.Police have opened an investigation into the shooting and have not ruled out any hypothesis. Managing editor John Paul Jubelag told Reporters Without Borders that he could not be sure of the motives for the attack. “The kind of reports that Danilo Aguirre worked on were mainly linked to development problems and had nothing really controversial about them,” he said.“Danilo Aguirre had not expressed an opinion on any sensitive political issues, even if our newspaper did recently do a report exposing abuses by judges and corruption in judicial circles,” he said.Aguirre, who is married and the father of two children, is suffering from a serious haemorrhage and needed a blood transfusion. Six General Santos journalists have given blood to try to save him.This latest incident comes at a time when the police chief for central Mindanao, Danny Mangila, had announced that an investigation into the murder of Rolando Morales, a General Santos journalist who was killed on 3 July this year, was about to lead to the arrest and charges against at least two suspects. Reporters Without Borders has also welcomed the arrest, on 14 September, of a suspect in the murder of Klein Cantoneros, a radio journalist who was shot dead on 3 May in Dipolog City. Several witnesses had reportedly identified Robert Woo as the killer. Mass international solidarity campaign launched in support of Maria Ressa Follow the news on Philippines Help by sharing this information Filipina journalist still held although court dismissed case eleven days ago to go furtherlast_img read more

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Bordeaux vintage could make €1000 a bottle

first_imgTwitter Facebook Print Email WhatsApp Advertisementcenter_img Linkedin 2009 vintage could reach €1000 a bottleIN A widely speculated market where much has been said regarding the “vintage of the century”, Bordeaux’s top 2009 wines could reach prices as high as €1000 per bottle by the end of summer, experts are predicting.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Decanter report that “Setting prices for the first growths and other major properties is an arcane business, but most observers are certain they will go high, inflated by many successive ‘tranches’ or releases of stock from the chateaux.”Some have said that the gap in price between the First Growths and the rest “will be enormous,” as one grower said adding that the best could top €1000 per bottle in some cases.Robert Parker, who published his scores recently, is of the same opinion.Some negociants have said that despite the recession, prices could start at €300, similar to 2005.Herve Berland, managing director of Chateau Mouton-Rothschild, told the online wine magazine that “a change in consumers’ post-recession buying behaviour would be reflected in the pricing of 2009.“On the positive side it’s an exceptional vintage. On the negative side, we’re still in crisis, and even as we come out of it, consumer habits have changed.“We are going to have to examine very carefully what the consumer is prepared to pay.”Bordeaux 2009 – a vintage to remember?ON publishing his scores, Robert Parker certainly agrees, describing it as “An incredibly exciting vintage of opulence, power and richness”. It may even be the “best Bordeaux vintage of recent times”.Prices? Who can tell? But many speculate: the top Chateaux could reach €1000 a bottle by the end of the summer! First Growths will remain elusive to all but the largest of purses… But what of “the rest”?From Vineyards Direct, supplying to the Irish market say they “are busy and firmly committed to tracking down the best possible selection of the rest.Their aim is to put together an “En primeur” collection totalling 20 wines “of real value” they say.They have, in bond pricing per case:Château Beaumont, Haut Médoc 2009 €110Château Forcas Dupre, Listrac-Médoc 2009 €120Château La Tour de By, Médoc 2009 €136Château Lanessan, Haut Médoc 2009 €138Château Lilian Ladouys, St Estephe, Cru Bourgeois, 2009 €155Château d’Angludet, Margaux, 2009 €246Wines, when bought would ship late 2011 to early 2012. NewsBordeaux vintage could make €1000 a bottleBy admin – May 6, 2010 498 Previous articleUp-swing forecast at the concert hallNext articleAsparagus and Gruyere tart adminlast_img read more

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Varavara Rao, Speaker Of Truth To Power; Eminent Scholars From All Over The World Seek Release Of Varvara Rao And All Other Bhima Koregaon Accused [Read Statement]

first_imgNews UpdatesVaravara Rao, Speaker Of Truth To Power; Eminent Scholars From All Over The World Seek Release Of Varvara Rao And All Other Bhima Koregaon Accused [Read Statement] Nitish Kashyap20 July 2020 10:39 PMShare This – xA total of one hundred and forty five eminent scholars and academicians from around the world have appealed for the immediate release of 81-year-old Telugu poet, literary critic Varavara Rao, who tested positive for Covid-19 and has been accused of inciting caste-based violence at Bhima Koregaon which took place on January 1, 2018 along with 10 other activists and…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginA total of one hundred and forty five eminent scholars and academicians from around the world have appealed for the immediate release of 81-year-old Telugu poet, literary critic Varavara Rao, who tested positive for Covid-19 and has been accused of inciting caste-based violence at Bhima Koregaon which took place on January 1, 2018 along with 10 other activists and academicians. Philosopher and cognitive scientist Noam Chomsky, who is also Institute Professor & Professor of Linguistics emeritus, MIT, english economist Barbara Harriss White, Emeritus Professor and Fellow Wolfson College, Oxford University and Dr Hugo Gorringe, Co-Director Centre for South Asian Studies, University of Edinburgh, UK are amongst the 145 eminent scholars who have sought immediate release of all the accused in the Bhima Koregaon case. The statement reads- “Varavara Rao, poet, writer, activist and long-time speaker of truth to power has been imprisoned for two years now, along with ten other scholar-activists. They have been charged with inciting violence in Bhima Koregaon, a charge widely regarded as false, and over the past two years the government has failed to bring the charges to court and start the trial. Conditions in the jails in which these prisoners of conscience have been kept are said to be unhealthy and the threat of spread of infection has grown. Mr Rao, who is 80 years old*, has now tested positive for COVID-19 and is seriously ill with several comorbidities. His condition suggests clear neglect of his health by the authorities. We join other international scholars in appealing for the immediate release of Varavara Rao and the other Elgar Parishad activists.” *Rao is 81-years-old, as confirmed by his immediate family. Rao’s lawyers have filed applications seeking bail on multiple occasions on medical grounds but it has been rejected every single time. The octogenarian was also arrested during the Emergency imposed in 1975 by then Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, under the Maintenance of internal Security Act (MISA) on charges of inciting violence through his writing. Along with journalist and human rights activist Gautam Navlakha, lawyer and unionist Sudha Bharadwaj, lawyer and dalit rights activist Surendra Gadling, activist Sudhir Dhawale, activist Rona Wilson, Assistant Professor Of English at Nagpur University Shoma Sen, tribal rights activist Mahesh Raut, academic Vernon Gonsalves, scholar and writer Anand Teltumbde, lawyer and activist Arun Ferreira and Rao have all been accused of having maoist links and booked under the newly amended and more stringent Unlawful Activities (Prevention) Act. Rao who was shifted to Nanavati Hospital from the state run St.George’s hospital on Sunday, reportedly fell at St.George’s and injured his head severely. But the family was not informed about the said incident and got to know from newspaper reports. In a press release today, Rao’s family demanded directions to the hospital administration or prison administration to provide transparent, official updates on his health and the line of treatment being administered to him on a regular basis once or twice in a day as long as he is in the hospital.Click Here To Download Statement[Read Statement]Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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Gardai investigate sexual assault incident in Ballybofey

first_img Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Gardai investigate sexual assault incident in Ballybofey Facebook Previous articleAmber Barrett nets in FC Köln winNext articleGP advisor warns of hospitals becoming overwhelmed with Covid cases News Highland Google+ News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest WhatsApp Twitter Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Homepage BannerNewscenter_img Gardaí are investigating an incident of sexual assault in Ballybofey last night.The incident is alleged to have occurred in the Glenview area of Ballybofey, around 8:30pm, Saturday 17th October.Gardai say enquiries are ongoing at this time. Facebook Twitter Google+ RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – October 18, 2020 Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Pinterest Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic WhatsApplast_img read more

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Commission reveals harrowing details of Donegal home

first_img WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest Facebook Commission reveals harrowing details of Donegal home Homepage BannerNews Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows WhatsApp Twitter Renewed calls for full-time Garda in Kilmacrennan Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Google+ Previous article3,086 Covid-19 cases and further 46 deaths confirmedNext articleCovid-19 reproduction rate in North drops News Highland The Taoiseach says the Mother and Baby Homes report highlights a “dark, difficult and shameful” chapter in Ireland’s history.The Commission of Investigation has found 9 thousand children died in the 18 institutions examined, including The Castle, Newtowncunningham and The Stranorlar County Home – around 15% of all those born.56,000 unmarried mothers – ranging in age from 12 years old to women in their 40s – passed through the homes between 1922 and 1998.The Commission’s found their cruel treatment and stigmatisation was supported and condoned by church and state.Following its recommendations, a redress scheme is to be set up and legislation will be brought forward so survivors can access their birth information.The Commission of Investigation has deemed The Castle, Newtowncunningham a non-traditional mother and baby home, rather a hostel.325 women from across Ireland and Northern Ireland, accompanied by 64 children passed through its doors between 1982 and 1998.Five babies born to mothers at The Castle died in hospitals shortly after birth.The Commission of Investigation also looked at the Stranorlar County Home where 1,646 unmarried mothers and 1,777 children lived between 1922 and 1964.Conditions there have been described as ‘very poor’.In the early 1920s, it was overcrowded with inadequate water and sanitary services including; no hot water in the operating theatre, as a result there were several outbreaks of typhoid.Most residents had to use outdoor toilets that were described as ‘bad or rather revolting’.Admissions to its labour ward were discontinued in 1935 as it lacked a bathroom and running water.At one stage, the Minister for Local Government ordered the home to supply residents with 3 meals a day as opposed to 4.Most of the work at the home was carried out by unmarried mothers, who were unpaid.Mothers of older children lived and slept separately and saw each other only on Sundays.Institutional records of Stranorlar county home suggest 343 ‘illegitimate’ children born in or admitted to the institution died in infancy or early childhood. Cross reference of records held by the GRO confirmed 339 child deaths – 60% of deaths were attributed to pneumonia or bronchitis.The full report can be accessed here. Google+ Twitter Pinterest By News Highland – January 12, 2021 Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens further Community Enhancement Programme open for applications last_img read more

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Statue of Confederate General Stonewall Jackson relocated from the Virginia Military Institute campus

first_imgjack looney/iStock BY: HALEY YAMADA, ABC NEWS(NEW YORK) — The Virginia Military Institute removed the statue of Confederate Gen. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson from its Lexington campus on Monday following allegations from Black cadets of racism at the school.The institution’s board voted to remove the statue from campus in late October after The Washington Post reported on students’ allegations of an “atmosphere of hostility and cultural insensitivity” at the school.After the story was published on Oct. 17, Virginia lawmakers approved a $1 million budget to open an independent investigation into the student’s allegations.Soon after, the school’s superintendent, retired Army Gen. H. Binford Peay III, announced his resignation. At the time, Peay said he made the decision to step down after Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam‘s “chief of staff conveyed that the governor and certain legislative leaders had lost confidence in my leadership.”Northam’s press secretary, Alena Yarmosky, said in a statement to ABC News at the time that “change is overdue at VMI, and the Board of Visitors bears a deep responsibility to embrace it.”The Virginia Military Institute (VMI) announced on Nov. 13 that retired Army Maj. Gen. Cedric Wins would be the school’s interim superintendent. Wins is the first Black leader to serve in that role.The school’s board also announced other changes on Nov. 23, including the creation of a permanent diversity office.The statue has been a focus of controversy for years, but the school had committed to keeping it in place as recently as July 2020, when Peay wrote in a statement, “We cannot eliminate our history nor do we desire to do so. Instead, we desire to build upon our past and will do our part to continue to build a strong Institute.”“I hope you will see that these four goals and five pillars take us positively to the future and address in deeper ways racism and equity than the simple means of removing statues and renaming buildings,” he added.Wins said that the statue will be relocated to a nearby Civil War museum.“It is an understatement to say the relocation of the statue has evoked strong opinions on both sides of the issue,” Wins said Monday.“The history of VMI over the past 181 years is well documented. Stonewall Jackson’s ties to Lexington and the Institute, as an instructor, are part of that history,” Wins said. But “VMI does not define itself by this statue and that is why this move is appropriate.”ABC News’ Emily Shapiro contributed to this report.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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BT employees to learn on-line with UfI

first_imgBT employees to learn on-line with UfIOn 21 Mar 2000 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. BT is the first company to sign up to use the University for Industry’son-line training courses.Courses in business management, customer care, retail and distribution andIT will be available on the company’s internal intranet from the autumn whenUfI goes into national operation.They will be run alongside BT’s own on-line training courses as part of theBT Academy which was launched by DTI Secretary Stephen Byers last month.BT said on-line courses will not replace all face-to-face and group teachingbut have the advantage that staff can learn at their own work stations at theirown pace.BT’s chief executive Sir Peter Bonfield said, “Given the pace ofchanges in technology and the hugely competitive markets BT operates in, we areengaged in a constant battle to get and keep people with the skills and talentto succeed. “If we are to retain the best we must put them in a learningorganisation that can help them develop to their full potential.”www.ufiltd.co.uk Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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