Canada: Fresh ideas for church structure, finances elude church council

first_img [Anglican Journal] Emerging from daylong discussions on May 25 about the future of the Anglican Church of Canada, members of the Council of General Synod (CoGS) appeared to lack ideas about what the next steps should be.In fact, members expressed feeling “overwhelmed” by the question of how to renew church structures.Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, said that instead of hearing new ideas, he heard a lot of familiar ones following reports coming out of small group discussion. Further, he said he wasn’t convinced that members were grasping the urgency of our situation.“We need to address [the issue] of finances and structure…I felt at times we were going up to it and then we stepped back,” said Hiltz. “Things must change if we’re going to go ahead in the spirit of the Marks of Mission.”Members had been divided into small, more intimate type of dialogue known as “World Café” as part of the Council’s goal to “consider clear directions and a plan for the efficient utilization of financial, staff and structural resources in the achievement of the priorities and practices set aside in Vision 2019.”Hiltz acknowledged that the intent was merely “to open the conversation and identify the challenges we face.” More focused conversations and courses of action are expected in meetings leading up to the 2013 Joint Lutheran-Anglican National Assembly.Members were asked to consider the following questions:How might God be using the current financial situation of General Synod to tell us about our future in carrying out Vision 2019?What might the Holy Spirit be telling us about ourselves as we grapple with the complexities of our current governance and structural challenges?How might Jesus be leading us on a journey of spiritual renewal through the presence of indigenous peoples among us, and their witness in the Mississauga Declaration.Some themes emerged. In conversations about finance, members prescribed that General Synod, the church’s governing body, “clearly and proactively articulate its unique mission and ministry” to Anglicans across Canada. Stewardship education is “essential” in helping improve the church’s financial stability, they said. Some members expressed a desire to “reframe current discussions” around finances, emphasizing that Anglicans must move from “a taxpayer to citizen mentality.” The church is not the national office in Toronto but “all local ministry in Canada,” and it is “a community not a bureaucracy,” they said.On the issue of governance, members said they “felt overwhelmed” because of the “complexity” of the structures.  Some said there is no mechanism to evaluate what’s in place, while others said future structures need to be “nimble and flexible.” There are structures that are “working well,” but members also recognize that in some places, they need to be overhauled due to financial constraints. Significant changes that are taking place in some parts of the church have been largely inspired and ushered in by indigenous ministries, others noted.Members said they have learned a lot about spirituality and renewal through General Synod’s partnership with the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP).  Others said that lack of knowledge about the partnership has impeded growth in the relationship. Some “resisted grouping all non-indigenous people together,” the report added.Council members had an opportunity to speak further when they formed a sacred circle after the reports were heard. A number noted that there was more “openness” in the life of the church.Archbishop Colin Johnson observed that Council wrestled with issues “in a way that moved from blame and despair into much more engaged, if not hopeful and forward-looking” mode. Johnson, who is diocesan bishop of Toronto and metropolitan of the ecclesiastical province of Ontario, said he came away from the discussions “far less dispirited and much more energized about the opportunities God has given us.” The church “is not any more broken than it ever was,” he added.Ron Chaplin (Diocese of Ottawa) said it was “more than fortuitous” that CoGS was discussing the church’s future on the eve of Pentecost. “We are approaching the cusp of profound change. What that looks like is not clear,” said Chaplin. But he reminded CoGS to be hopeful, citing that Jesus himself had said, “the wind blows where it wishes, and you hear its sound, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit (John 3:8).”Martha Gardner, Episcopal Church partner to CoGs, challenged Council members to think in terms of “God’s mission and God’s church” and not “our church.” She said the question is, “How can we get out of ourselves and get a sense of where we need to go, where God is leading us?”— Marites N. Sison is staff writer for the Anglican Journal. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canada: Fresh ideas for church structure, finances elude church council Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC center_img Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release By Marites N. SisonPosted May 29, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

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No known motive in photographer’s murder in Cúcuta

first_img RSF_en December 21, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 No known motive in photographer’s murder in Cúcuta ColombiaAmericas Reporters Without Borders is deeply shocked by the fatal shooting of Rafael Bruno, 76, a photographer with the regional daily La Opinión, on 19 December in the northeastern city of Cúcuta. The organisation extends its condolences to the victim’s colleagues.“We join La Opinión’s staff in mourning Bruno, who had no wife or children,” the press freedom organisation said. “The department of Norte de Santander, where he lived and worked, has many paramilitaries and drug traffickers but the kind of work Bruno did was not likely to have made him a target. We hope the investigation will identify the motive. But first the murderer or murderers must be found.”Bruno’s body was found in his Cúcuta home after neighbours called the police. A revolver was found beside the body, suggesting it might have been suicide. But the police also found five spent shells and yesterday’s autopsy established from the trajectory of the shot to the head that killed him that it could not have been suicide.No theories have yet been developed about the motive. His colleagues at La Opinión say he had not received any threats. He usually covered stories that were not at all sensitive, such as beauty competitions. The most recent sensitive subject he had covered was the demobilisation of the Bloc Catatumbo – a wing of the paramilitary alliance known as the United Self-Defence Groups of Colombia (AUC) – in Tibú at the end of 2004. The newspaper has not received any serious threats in recent months.Bruno was also the owner of a brickyard and an ice plant. He was a member of both the Cúcuta Association of Journalists and the Colombian Association of Small-Scale Industrialists (Acopi). His only relatives are a sister and a nephew living in Venezuela. His funeral took place today in Cúcuta. April 27, 2021 Find out more ColombiaAmericas Follow the news on Colombia May 13, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts News to go furthercenter_img RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America Reports News 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies RSF, IFEX-ALC and Media Defence, support FLIP and journalist Diana Díaz against state harassment in Colombia Organisation Help by sharing this information News October 21, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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China – Newspaper president’s release after four years hailed

first_imgNews to go further Receive email alerts China’s Cyber ​​Censorship Figures Reporters Without Borders welcomes the release today of Yu Huafeng, the former president of the liberal Guangzhou-based newspaper Nanfang Dushi Bao, after his sentence was reduced for the third time. He ended up serving four years of what originally was a 12-year sentence on corruption charges. RSF_en Democracies need “reciprocity mechanism” to combat propaganda by authoritarian regimes March 12, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information News ChinaAsia – Pacific Follow the news on China February 8, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 China – Newspaper president’s release after four years hailed Organisation China: Political commentator sentenced to eight months in prison June 2, 2021 Find out more ChinaAsia – Pacific April 27, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders welcomes the release today of Yu Huafeng, the former president of the liberal Guangzhou-based newspaper Nanfang Dushi Bao, after his sentence was reduced for the third time. He ended up serving four years of what originally was a 12-year sentence on corruption charges. When the sentence was reduced to eight years on appeal in May 2004, Yu said: “You can manipulate the law but not history.” “Yu’s release, obtained thank to the efforts of thousands of Chinese journalists, comes just two days after the release of Ching Cheong and clearly shows that campaigns of support for imprisoned journalists and cyber-dissidents can be successful,” Reporters Without Borders said. The campaigning for the release of other prisoners of conscience, including Hu Jia, must be stepped up before the Olympic Games.” Reporters Without Borders pays tribute to Yu, who headed one of China’s most independent and innovative dailies. He was the victim of a conspiracy by officials in Guangdong province who wanted to punish the newspaper for its outspoken reports, including its exposure of the death of a student in a police station. Yu’s wife, Xiang Li, told Reporters Without Borders that he left Panyu prison, near Guangzhou, at 8 a.m. today and is already at home getting ready to celebrate the Lunar New Year with his family. She said she was very happy and thanked all those in China and abroad who had supported Yu. Yu and the newspaper’s managing editor, Li Minying, were arrested in January 2004 and were sentenced to 12 and 11 years in prison respectively for alleged corruption. The newspaper’s editor, Cheng Yizhong, was also detained in 2004 in the same case, without ever being brought to trial. The sentences of Yu and Li were reduced to eight and six years respectively on appeal. Another year was taken off Yu’s sentence in February 2007, a few days after Li was released. More than 2,300 Chinese journalists signed a petition for the release of Yu and Li in 2005, pointing out that all they did was award some employees bonuses linked to an increase in the newspaper’s earnings from advertising. News Newslast_img read more

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Mc Conalogue calls for immediate action on Child Deaths in State Care report

first_img Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Twitter Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Pinterest Twitter Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Previous articleIndependent Councillors to decide Donegal’s next MayorNext articleConstituency Commission: Donegal constituencies merge into single 5 seater News Highland Donegal North East Deputy Charlie Mc Conalogue says the government must quickly implement the findings of the report from the independent review group on the deaths of children in State care.Deputy Mc Conalogue, the Fianna Fail Spokesperson on Children says it’s imperative that resources and proper management structures be put in place to ensure that children are not allowed slip through the net as happened on a number of occasions over the past 10 years.196 children in state care died between 2000 and 2010, a situation which Deputy Mc Conalogue says cannot be allowed happen again………….[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/ccmcc1pm.mp3[/podcast] Google+ Facebook Newsx Adverts Google+center_img By News Highland – June 21, 2012 WhatsApp 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North WhatsApp 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Mc Conalogue calls for immediate action on Child Deaths in State Care report RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Facebook Pinterestlast_img read more

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Breaking: Centre Moves Supreme Court Against Delhi HC’s Show Cause Notice On It’s Failure Of Oxygen Supply To Delhi, CJI Directs To Place Before Chandrachud.J’s Bench

first_imgTop StoriesBreaking: Centre Moves Supreme Court Against Delhi HC’s Show Cause Notice On It’s Failure Of Oxygen Supply To Delhi, CJI Directs To Place Before Chandrachud.J’s Bench Mehal Jain4 May 2021 11:15 PMShare This – xCentral Government has moved Supreme Court against Delhi High Court Order to show cause why contempt action should not be taken against Centre for non-compliance of its order of May 1 and Supreme Court order regarding supply of Oxygen to Delhi Government.SG Tushar Mehta mentioned before the Supreme Court on Thursday the Centre’s plea arising out of a Delhi High Court order of yesterday regarding contempt action against its officials over oxygen supply to the national capital.It may be noted that the Delhi High Court on Tuesday pulled up the Centre for its failure to meet the assurance with regard to the supply of 700MT per day liquid medical oxygen to the Delhi Government in line with the directions passed by the Supreme Court.A division bench comprising Justices Vipin Sanghi and Rekha Palli has directed the presence of Central Government officers Sumita Dawra and Piyush Goyal, who are handling oxygen allocation to states, tomorrow, to explain the failure to comply with the High Court and Supreme Court’s order to supply the required oxygen to the Delhi Government to treat critical COVID patients.Mentioning the matter before the bench of CJ N. V. Ramana and Justice Surya Kant, the SG advanced, “I have mentioned the matter before the Listing Registrar. There is some urgency. It needs to be heard today. An order has been passed by the Delhi High court yesterday regarding the oxygen issue. The High Court, relying on Your Lordships’ directions, has asked the government officials to be present in person in contempt””What can we do?”, asked the bench.”This issue needs your attention. Please look into it. It is a pan-India issue”, urged the SG.”I don’t hear his matter, that is why I have given it to Justice Chandrachud’s bench”, said the CJI.”It may go anywhere. But let it be heard today, please”, prayed the SG.The CJI then directed that the matter be placed before a bench headed by Justice D. Y. Chandrachud and be listed as per his convenience.The Supreme Court, in an order passed on April 30, had directed the Central Government to rectify the oxygen deficit of NCT of Delhi on or before the midnight of May 3. The direction was passed based on an assurance of the Solicitor General that the oxygen needs of Delhi will be met. The Supreme Court bench comprised Justices Chandrachud, L. Nageswara Rao and Ravindra Bhat.Tags#Supreme Court #Delhi High Court #Contempt #Show cause notice #Oxygen Supply Next Storylast_img read more

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Judge rejects request to move trial of only officer charged in Breonna Taylor killing

first_imgShelby County Detention CenterBy BILL HUTCHINSON, ABC News(LOUISVILLE, Ky.) — A judge has rejected the request by a fired police officer facing charges related to the killing of Breonna Taylor to change the venue of his trial after his attorney argued that the jury pool in Jefferson County, Kentucky, has been tainted by an “avalanche” of negative publicity.Jefferson County Circuit Court Judge Ann Bailey Smith ruled that moving Brett Hankison’s trial at this point is premature, but cautioned that she remains open to granting the request if it becomes apparent that an impartial jury can’t be seated in Louisville.An attorney for Hankison said it would be nearly impossible for the former Louisville Metro Police Department officer to get a fair trial in Jefferson County, where Oprah Winfrey has paid for numerous billboards to be erected calling for Hankison and two other white officers to be indicted for the shooting of the 26-year-old Black woman in her own home.During Thursday’s hearing, defense attorney Stewart Matthews told Smith that because Hankison is the only officer facing criminal prosecution as a result of Taylor’s death, he is a “convenient target” for people who want revenge, according to the Louisville Courier Journal.Jim Lesousky, a prosecutor with the state attorney general’s office, asked Smith to deny the request. He noted a jury was successfully seated on Tuesday in the murder trial of former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin for the death of George Floyd, a case that generated just as much, if not, more protests and pretrial publicity.Hankison was indicted in September on three felony counts of wanton endangerment for firing errant shots that penetrated a wall in Taylor’s apartment and entered a neighboring residence occupied by three people. He has pleaded not guilty to the charges and is scheduled to go on trial in August.Matthews argued that the pretrial publicity, protests and statements by nationally known celebrities portraying Hankison as a “murderer” have snowballed to the point that an unbiased jury can’t be found in Jefferson County, which, according to U.S. Census data, is the most diverse county in Kentucky.The billboards put up around Louisville to encourage residents to “demand that the police involved in killing Breonna Taylor be arrested and charged,” quoting Winfrey as saying, “If you turn a blind eye to racism, you become an accomplice to it.”Matthews also argued that the public disclosure of Hankison’s termination letter from the police department — in which former police Chief Robert Schroeder said Hankison used deadly force by “wantonly and blindly” firing 10 shots into Taylor’s apartment — “most certainly lends an unfair and unsubstantiated air of credibility to the charges” against his client.Taylor, an emergency medical technician, was shot to death in her apartment on March 13, 2020, when Louisville police served a warrant in connection to a drug investigation targeting Taylor’s ex-boyfriend. Police said that although they had obtained a “no-knock” warrant, they knocked and announced themselves before ramming open the front door.Taylor’s new boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, claimed the officers neither knocked nor announced themselves, prompting him to fire a single shot at them as they came through the door, hitting Sgt. Jonathan Mattingly in the leg.Police responded by firing a total of 32 shots, authorities said.Mattingly and former officer Myles Cosgrove fired a combined 22 shots, six of which hit Taylor. Hankison was standing outside the apartment and fired 10 shots through a sliding glass patio door, missing Taylor.State Attorney General Daniel Cameron justified the use of deadly force because Walker fired the first shot. Cameron said his office did not present evidence to the grand jury supporting any homicide charges against the officers.Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Fruitus’ chewier offering

first_imgLyme Regis Foods has expanded its Fruitus organic fruit and oat bar range, packaging for which features bold, clear branding and rich fruit colours on a natural cream background.Fruitus now consists of a broader and more comprehensive fruit snacking offering that includes the existing moist fruit and oat bars and now also chewy fruit bites in a number of different varieties. All products in the range contain a whole portion of fruit per pack and have no added sugar, and no artificial colours, flavours or preservatives.Fruitus moist organic fruit and oat bars are available in four varieties – Apricot, Apple, Mixed Berry, and the new ’super-fruits’ variant, Pomegranate and Blueberry. Fruitus chewy fruit bites are available in three varieties – Raspberry, Blackcurrant and Apricot.[http://www.lymeregisfoods.com]last_img read more

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Big drop in wheat volumes predicted

first_imgThe English wheat harvest is likely to be just 11.74m tonnes this year, according to estimates from Defra, a fall of almost 10% compared to last year.Defra’s June survey, published last week, revealed that total wheat plantings for 2013 in England were down 19%, from 1.86 million hectares to 1.51m hectares, the smallest area since the early 1980s. Plantings were hampered by poor weather last autumn, a situation that means this year’s harvest is likely to be well below the 13m tonnes produced last year.However, the National Farmers’ Union’s (NFU’s) 2013 Harvest Survey said yields were up 16% from 6.7 to 7.8 tonnes per hectare.According to the NFU combinable crops board chairman Andrew Watts, the fall in production would lead to above-normal volumes of wheat imports for the second year running. However, the high quality meant much more of what has been harvested would be of value to the food industry this year.“Farmers worked really hard to get this year’s crop up and running, but with planting down by 19%, I’m not surprised overall wheat production is down,” he said. “Many arable farmers are still working under the shadow of 2012’s appalling weather and the knock-on impact this has had. For most, the problem is now in the office; working to balance the books, cover production costs and, looking ahead to next year, I’m hoping we can move on to a more positive outlook.”The NFU said that, as a net importer of food, the UK must start to produce more itself and called on government to deliver on its promises to improve long-neglected agricultural research and knowledge exchange to help weather-proof British crops.“A reverse in the decline of spend for agricultural R&D is crucial if we are to increase production and impact less on the environment in years to come, particularly if extreme weather events become more frequent,” said Watts. “Innovation and technology are vital in keeping crops healthy and resilient, yet this technology has been under a sustained and unwarranted attack recently, and the impacts could be grave for the industry.“The last thing we want is for legislators to regulate the UK and EU out of arable production by undermining access to pesticides and products that will be vital to protect the crops of the future.”last_img read more

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Start-up Irish biscuit firm makes €15m investment

first_imgNew biscuit manufacturer The East Coast Bakehouse is to invest €15m (£10.7m) in its manufacturing facility in Drogheda, Ireland.The newly established biscuit company will have its own brand, as well as manufacturing retail private label. The team behind it previously established the Jacob Fruitfield Group.The new 50,000sq ft site is situated on Ireland’s east coast, and the opening will create around 100 jobs at the factory.Bakehouse commercial director Daragh Monahan told British Baker sister publication The Grocer: “The building we have secured is an old engineering facility. We went for it because of the length – it is 120m which is what is required for biscuit manufacturing.“The site has its own warehousing and loading bays and we are now ordering brand-new, bespoke manufacturing equipment including an 80-metre oven – there are not many of those in the UK.”He also said the bakery would focus on developing quality biscuits, targeting the mainstream market.The new facility includes an innovation centre, so that retailers can visit the site and test recipes for own ranges.The company is also working with the Irish Food Board, Bord Bía in London, to develop links with retailers in the UK. Here it expects to generate 80%-90% of its turnover.Production is expected to be up and running by the beginning of the first quarter next year, and recruitment for bakers and factory workers has begun.Monahan continued: “They now have the option to buy Irish and also a new competitor to their existing suppliers, which is great for retailers.”last_img read more

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Harvard awards 9 honorary degrees

first_imgOprah WinfreyDoctor of LawsA beloved television icon and philanthropist, Oprah Winfrey rose from humble roots to create a global media empire, becoming one of America’s most respected and influential public figures in the process.Winfrey was born in 1954 to a single teenage mother in rural Mississippi, where she endured a poor and abusive childhood. After turning around a struggling Chicago talk show in the 1980s, she quickly garnered national attention and developed her own syndicated program. “The Oprah Winfrey Show,” which ran from 1986 to 2011, topped the daytime talk show ratings for 24 consecutive seasons and revolutionized the genre.In 2011, Winfrey launched the Oprah Winfrey Network, a cable channel that reaches two-thirds of American households. Her other holdings include the movie production company Harpo Films; Oprah Radio, a satellite radio channel on Sirius XM; Oprah.com, which now hosts Winfrey’s wildly successful book club; the daytime television production company Harpo Studios; and the monthly lifestyle publication O, The Oprah Magazine.Over the years, Winfrey has used her considerable influence to bring attention and aid to a number of causes. Her public charity Oprah’s Angel Network raised more than $80 million to build schools, women’s shelters, homes, and youth centers and to fund scholarships. Her private charity, the Oprah Winfrey Foundation, has awarded grants to hundreds of organizations to help women, children, and families. In 2007, she founded the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls, in South Africa.She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Kennedy Center Honors and the Jean Hersholt Humanitarian Award, and is a member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People’s Hall of Fame.José Antonio AbreuDoctor of MusicMusician, economist, and educator José Antonio Abreu has shaped generations of musicians in his native Venezuela and beyond through El Sistema, the publicly funded national network of youth orchestras he founded in 1975. Wielding classical music as an unlikely weapon in the war on poverty and inequality, he has armed millions of Venezuelan children with musical training, launched the careers of some of the world’s most renowned conductors and musicians, and given his country a new source of national pride.Formally called La Fundación del Estado para el Sistema Nacional de las Orquestras Juveniles e Infantiles de Venezuela, the foundation has reached more than 400,000 children, providing a creative outlet and social mobility for children from impoverished backgrounds. Careful to keep the program nonpartisan, Abreu has helped El Sistema thrive through 10 government administrations. El Sistema now sponsors 31 youth orchestras and more than 200 music centers in Venezuela, and has spawned sister programs in the United States and several European countries.Born in the city of Valera in 1939, Abreu began studying piano at age 9 and violin at 12. Drawn to both orchestral and Venezuelan folk music, he received musical training at the national conservatory and was educated in economics at the Universidad Católica Andrés Bello. He has been guest conductor and organ soloist with the Venezuela Symphony Orchestra, a professor of economics, and a civil servant, and has served in a number of governmental roles in Venezuela, including minister of culture, president of the National Council for Culture, and adviser to the National Economic Council.Abreu has received numerous awards for his work, including Venezuela’s National Music Prize, the Polar Music Prize, and the UNICEF Prize. He is an honorary member of the Royal Philharmonic Society.Sir Partha DasguptaDoctor of LawsA development and welfare economist, Sir Partha Dasgupta has helped bridge the gap between economics and other disciplines — from anthropology to nutrition to ecology — by studying the relationships among poverty, population growth, and the environment.His work has attempted to introduce “natural capital” into economics. “Until economists take nature seriously, we will not know how current policy will affect future people,” he has said. He has written on the link between malnutrition and the capacity to work, and the link between social capital and resource allocation in the developing world.Dasgupta was born in the then-Indian city of Dhaka in 1942 and educated in Varanasi and New Delhi, India, and in Cambridge, U.K. He studied mathematics and physics as an undergraduate in the 1960s, but as he became more troubled by the Vietnam War, he turned to economics for what he saw as its ability to address political questions. (Economics was also a family affair: He is the son of economist A.K. Dasgupta.) He received his doctorate in economics from Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1968.From 1971 to 1984, he taught at the London School of Economics, where he dabbled in various fields and worked with such renowned economists as Joseph Stiglitz, Amartya Sen, and Kenneth Arrow. In 1985, he joined the faculty at the University of Cambridge, where he is currently the Frank Ramsey Professor Emeritus of Economics and a fellow of St. John’s College.He is the author of several books, including “An Inquiry into Well-Being and Destitution” (1993) and “Human Well-Being and the Natural Environment” (2001), and his collected papers were published in two volumes by Oxford University Press in 2010. Dasgupta is also a founder of the journal Environment and Development Economics, which has provided publishing opportunities to promising scholars in the developing world. The recipient of numerous awards and fellowships, he was knighted in 2002.Donald R. HopkinsDoctor of ScienceAs an African-American growing up during segregation, Donald R. Hopkins determined, as he once put it, “to show the world what I could do.” And while Hopkins achieved his childhood dream of becoming a doctor, he more than lived up to his initial promise. In fighting for the eradication of both smallpox and Guinea worm disease — two of the 20th century’s most horrific diseases — he has helped save the lives of and prevent the suffering of millions.A Miami native from a family of 12, Hopkins graduated from Morehouse College in 1962. He then earned a medical degree at the University of Chicago, where he completed a residency in pediatrics, and a master’s degree from Harvard School of Public Health. During his training, he joined the World Health Organization’s campaign to end smallpox, which at the time killed one in four of its victims. From 1967 to 1969, he directed the Smallpox Eradication/Measles Control Program in Sierra Leone, where his team’s vaccination strategy of aggressive containment and surveillance gained traction worldwide for its effectiveness. By 1980, the disease had been wiped out completely.Throughout the 1970s and ’80s, Hopkins served as an assistant professor of tropical public health at Harvard, and as assistant director for international health, deputy director, and acting director at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta.In 1987, he joined the Carter Center, where he led a Guinea worm eradication program for 10 years before assuming his current role as vice president for health programs. Since Hopkins began his one-man crusade to end the excruciatingly painful, waterborne scourge of Africa’s rural poor, cases of the disease have dropped from 3.5 million to fewer than 600 annually.A 1995 MacArthur Foundation fellow, Hopkins is also the author of the Pulitzer Prize-nominated 1983 book “Princes and Peasants: Smallpox in History” (later reissued as “The Greatest Killer”).Lord May of OxfordDoctor of ScienceIn a career that has spanned more than half a century, Robert May has proven to be the rarest species of scientist: an accomplished practitioner equally skilled in conveying science’s vital importance to the public good.Born in Sydney, Australia, in 1938, May studied (and excelled in) the natural sciences, mathematics, and chemical engineering as an undergraduate — recognizing, he later said, “that there is no recipe for being a successful creative scientist.” He received his doctorate in theoretical physics from the University of Sydney in 1959.Over the past five decades, he has held academic appointments at Harvard, the University of Sydney, Princeton University, and Oxford University, where he is a professor of zoology and fellow of Merton College. A self-described “scientist with a short attention span,” he helped pioneer the field of theoretical ecology and became known for groundbreaking applications of mathematics, particularly chaos theory, to population biology. He has applied his findings on how populations are structured and how they respond to change to a number of subjects, from infectious disease and biodiversity to human-created networks like the British banking system.From 1995 to 2000, May was chief scientific adviser to the British government and head of its Office of Science and Technology. From 2000 to 2005, he served as president of the Royal Society, the fellowship of eminent scientists that often advises policymakers. He was appointed a life peer, or non-party-affiliated lifetime member, of the House of Lords in 2001. In each high-profile position, he earned a reputation as a passionate and effective advocate for scientists’ role in policy debates on cloning, climate change, genetically modified foods, and other controversial issues.May is the recipient of the Royal Swedish Academy’s Crafoord Prize (the highest award given in the field of ecology) and the Royal Society’s Copley Medal, its oldest and most prestigious award. He was knighted in 1996, and in 2002 he received the British Commonwealth’s Order of Merit, an honor restricted to just 24 living members.Thomas M. MeninoDoctor of LawsAs Boston’s longest-serving mayor, Thomas M. Menino has shepherded the cradle of the American Revolution into the 21st century. In wedding major development projects to a focus on neighborhood renewal, Menino earned overwhelming popular support for his 20-year stewardship of what he often calls “the greatest city on Earth.”A lifelong resident of Boston’s Hyde Park, Menino was born the grandson of Italian immigrants in 1942. After graduating from high school, he entered politics, helping with Democratic campaigns while working as an insurance salesman and later taking jobs in a number of state and city offices. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, at age 45.Menino served on Boston’s City Council from 1984 to 1993, representing Hyde Park and Roslindale. In 1993, while president of the council, he was appointed acting mayor after Raymond Flynn left office. He was subsequently elected for five more terms.Menino’s tenure has been marked by a pound-the-pavement work ethic — polls consistently find that half the city’s residents have met Menino personally. Known as the “Urban Mechanic,” he has been lauded for running a fiscally responsible, scandal-free City Hall while reducing violent crime rates, improving student test scores, and overseeing a commercial and residential building boom that revitalized both struggling neighborhoods and the downtown and waterfront areas.As mayor, Menino has been an early and outspoken advocate for public health initiatives, lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) rights, and gun control, issues that occasionally brought him into the national spotlight. In April, he helped guide a grieving city and nation through the Boston Marathon bombings; under his watch, the city received praise for its handling of the medical and police response to the crisis.After a series of health problems kept him hospitalized for several weeks in 2012, Menino announced in March that he would not seek re-election this November. As for his successor, he said, “I just ask that you choose someone who loves this city as much as I do.”Elaine PagelsDoctor of LawsAn expert on the religions of late antiquity, Elaine Pagels has done more than perhaps any other living scholar to illuminate the long-forgotten writings of early Christianity that lie outside the biblical canon — particularly the Gnostic Gospels, the set of ancient texts discovered in Egypt in 1945 that describe the teachings of Jesus and his contemporaries.Born in Palo Alto, Calif., in 1943, Pagels explored evangelicalism as a teenager. Though she left her congregation at 16, she remained attracted to Christianity, finding the New Testament both compelling and frustrating. After earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees at Stanford University, she came to Harvard to pursue a Ph.D. in religion. There, she joined a team studying the Nag Hammadi library, a famous collection of third- and fourth-century Gnostic manuscripts.Pagels joined the faculty at Barnard College in 1970, and became chair of its religion department four years later. In 1982 she left for Princeton University, where she is currently Harrington Spear Paine Foundation Professor of Religion.The recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship and a MacArthur Foundation “genius grant,” she is known for accessible prose that brings to life millennia-old theological debates for the modern reader. Her 1979 best-seller, “The Gnostic Gospels,” received both the National Book Critics Circle Award and the National Book Award; the Modern Library named it one of the 100 best English-language nonfiction books of the 20th century.She is the author several other books, including “Beyond Belief: The Secret Gospel of Thomas,” “The Origin of Satan: How Christians Demonized Jews, Pagans, and Heretics,” “Adam, Eve, and the Serpent: Sex and Politics in Early Christianity,” and most recently, “Revelations: Visions, Prophecy, and Politics in the Book of Revelation.”C. Dixon Spangler Jr.Doctor of LawsAs a former president of both the University of North Carolina (UNC) and Harvard’s Board of Overseers, C. Dixon Spangler Jr. holds the unique distinction of having shaped the course of America’s oldest public and private universities. As former Harvard President Lawrence H. Summers said of him, “He has a deep devotion to education and a remarkable insight into how universities work.”Spangler was born in Charlotte, N.C., in 1932. After graduating from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, in 1954, he received an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School (where his name is now familiar to the hundreds of students who study and socialize in his namesake building, the Spangler Center). He returned to his native state to enter the family businesses of real estate, construction supplies, and banking. He ran a number of companies, most notably the Bank of North Carolina, his father’s ailing bank, which he turned around and merged with NCNB (now Bank of America) in 1982.Business, however, was merely Spangler’s first act, one that set the stage for his successful leadership in higher education. He served as chairman of the North Carolina State Board of Education from 1982 to 1986. As UNC’s president from 1986 to 1997, he boosted enrollment and faculty funding while prioritizing educational quality and affordability. Since his retirement from the university, he has donated millions to UNC, Harvard, and Teach for America.From 1998 to 2004, he was a member of Harvard’s Board of Overseers, and served as the board’s president from 2003 to 2004. In his spare time, Spangler enjoys repairing grandfather clocks.JoAnne StubbeDoctor of ScienceThe Novartis Professor of Chemistry and a professor of biology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), JoAnne Stubbe has developed a body of successful research that shows the power of chemistry to solve some of biology’s most pressing problems.Her most noted work has explained how nature harnesses the reactivity of free radicals to carry out complex, highly specific chemistry. For instance, her lab has explained the mechanism of enzymes called ribonucleotide reductases that allow RNA to copy and repair DNA, as well as the point at which such conversions can go awry — research that led to the design of a drug, gemcitabine, that is now used to treat pancreatic and other cancers. Stubbe’s team also discovered the structure and function of bleomycin, an antibiotic used as a cancer treatment, revealing how the drug damages DNA at a structural level and kills cancer cells. She and her collaborators are now experimenting with the use of bacterial enzymes to create biodegradable plastics, an alternative to oil-based plastics.To her colleagues, she is admired as a scientist’s scientist, a creative and relentless critical thinker who remains dedicated to “unraveling nature’s beauty in ways unimaginable,” as she once described her work.Before joining the MIT faculty in 1987, Stubbe held assistant professorships at Williams College, Yale Medical School, and the University of Wisconsin, where she became a full professor. She earned a bachelor’s degree in chemistry in 1968 from the University of Pennsylvania and a Ph.D. in organic chemistry in 1971 from the University of California, Berkeley. Born in Champaign, Ill., in 1946, she has received numerous awards, including the National Medal of Science.last_img read more

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