Ireland 12 South Africa 16: The Verdict

first_imgTry: Pienaar. Con: Lambie. Pens: Lambie 3.Referee: Wayne Barnes (England) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS NOT FOR FEATURED South Africa scrum-half Ruan Pienaar: “We had a terrible first half and our kicking game wasn’t that great. In the second half our forwards made a huge step up. We got a couple of good drives going, kept the ball and forced them to make errors.”In quotes – losersIreland coach Declan Kidney: “Once South Africa got their mauling game going, they smothered us. With the breakdown, we were unable to get quick ball in the second half.”Getting stuck in: Patrick Lambie and Chris HenryTop statsIll-discipline played a big part in the game with both sides conceding 15 penalties, while the lack of clinical back play was highlighted by the fact Ireland made only two line breaks and South Africa none.Match highlights (video)Ireland: Simon Zebo; Tommy Bowe, Keith Earls, Gordon D’Arcy (Ronan O’Gara 75), Andrew Trimble (Fergus McFadden 58); Jonathan Sexton, Conor Murray (Eoin Reddan 61); Cian Healy (David Kilcoyne 41-45), Richardt Strauss (Sean Cronin 3-10, 75), Mike Ross (Michael Bent 70), Mike McCarthy (Donncha O’Callaghan 70), Donnacha Ryan (Donncha O’Callaghan 63-67), Peter O’Mahony, Chris Henry, Jamie Heaslip (captain).Pens: Sexton 4.South Africa: Zane Kirchner; JP Pietersen, Jaco Taute, Jean de Villiers (captain), Francois Hougaard; Pat Lambie, Ruan Pienaar; CJ van der Linder (Heinke van der Merwe 63), Adriaan Strauss, Jannie du Plessis (Patrick Cilliers 55), Eben Etzebeth (Flip van der Merwe 70), Juandre Kruger, Francois Louw, Willem Alberts (Marcell Coetzee 64), Duane Vermeulen. Up and at ’em: Tommy Bowe competes for a high ball with Zane Kirchner during Ireland’s defeat by South AfricaIn a nutshellIT WAS an unspectacular match at the Aviva Stadium in Dublin, with the physical exchanges dominating and little creative attacking play on show. Ireland built a healthy 12-3 half-time lead, capitalising on South Africa’s poor discipline, but the Boks started the second period with aplomb. By focusing on their powerful rucking and mauling game, they were able to force Ireland into making mistakes and they never looked like losing once Ruan Pienaar scored his 45th-minute try.Key momentThe Springboks took full advantage of Jamie Heaslip’s sin-binning in the 42nd minute. The visitors had forced Ireland to infringe at a maul early in the second half and Heaslip paid the price for committing the third offence. While their captain was off, Ireland conceded ten points, which allowed the Boks to take a lead they never relinquished.Lynchpin: South Africa No 9 Ruan PienaarStar manRuan Pienaar gave his Ulster team-mates a painful reminder of why he is such a good player, doing exactly what he does week in, week out for the Irish province but this time in a South Africa jersey. He dictated the Boks’ game, particularly in the second half where he upped the tempo and scored the vital try.Room for improvementBoth sides need to look at their attacking game as neither could pose a real threat when spreading the ball along the back-line. At least South Africa can use their physicality to pummel teams; Ireland need to take inspiration from Leinster and Ulster, who have both shown wonderful creative play in recent seasons.Yes, Ireland have a debilitating injury list, losing several front-line names, but they need to look at their game plan. At the moment, Declan Kidney’s side are too one-dimensional and that could cost them when they face Argentina in a fortnight with vital world ranking points at stake.Discipline should also be a concern for both these teams. The Boks’ penalty count was in double figures by half-time and while they tightened things up after the break it is sure to be something Heyneke Meyer looks at this week ahead of the Scotland Test.In quotes – winnerslast_img read more

Read More →

Saints and Sinners: The weekend’s talking points

first_imgQuins quashed: Jamie Codmore celebrates Clermont’s victoryChance missedHarlequins needed to beat Clermont Auvergne to keep their Pool Four hopes alive and they did everything to achieve that aim, only to fall on their faces at the last. They led from the 22nd minute to the 72nd but a try from Sitiveni Sivivatu and a penalty from Brock James allowed Clermont to sneak home 16-13.When Quins were 13-8 up with ten minutes to go, the usually reliable Nick Evans missed a straightforward 35-metre penalty. From there, Clermont attacked and created Sivivatu’s try. After James had put Clermont ahead, Quins turned down a kickable penalty to go for a potentially winning try, but a crooked throw from Dave Ward at the close-range lineout laid waste to that final chance. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS TAGS: Glasgow WarriorsHarlequinsLeicester TigersLeinsterMunsterSaracensScarletsUlster LONDON, ENGLAND – JANUARY 11: Jamie Cudmore of Clermont celebrates their victory during the Heineken Cup Round 5 match between Harlequins and ASM Clermont Auvergne at Twickenham Stoop on January 11, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Christopher Lee/Getty Images) center_img Munster monster: Paul O’Connell was on outstanding formTwo of the bestBig players step up on big occasions and Paul O’Connell and Ruan Pienaar both proved that point as they played major roles in wins for Munster and Ulster respectively. O’Connell ruled the roost at Kingsholm, bossing the lineout and giving a masterclass in the choke tackle as Munster chalked up their seventh away win on the bounce in the Heineken Cup.Pienaar was the Man of the Match in Ulster’s 27-16 win over Montpellier, which keeps their 100% record in Pool Five alive. He scored 17 points, chasing his own kick to grab a try, narrowly missing out on another when he was held up over the line, and kicking three conversions and two penalties.The SinnersPromise brokenSaracens’ sparkling form coming into the weekend of Heineken Cup rugby gave fans of English rugby cause to be optimistic that the fortress that is Toulouse’s Stade Ernest-Wallon might be breached at last. However, they were out-muscled by their French hosts, lost 21-11 and were barely able to produce any of the vibrant, attacking rugby which has characterised their Aviva Premiership campaign this season.No English club has won a Heineken Cup match on the Toulouse home ground and while Saracens still have a strong chance of reaching the quarter-finals as a pool runner-up, they will be gutted that they did not even secure a losing bonus point this weekend.No, no NikoGlasgow Warriors were leading 15-10 at Exeter Chiefs as the clocked ticked past full time. They were ready to celebrate a win on the road, and a victory which would give them the chance of qualifying for the Amlin Challenge Cup quarter-finals. Replacement scrum-half Niko Matawalu got his hands on the ball and just needed to boot it into touch to herald the final whistle. Instead, the Fijian put an up-and-under up the middle of the park and condemned his team to what head coach Gregor Townsend called “two minutes extra tackling practise” before they were able to put the ball dead. Flying finish: Matt Hoppers dives joyfully over for a try set up by the individual brilliance of Danny Careby Katie FieldThe SaintsSkills and thrillsWhy do we watch rugby? For many fans, it’s all about the moments of stunning skill, those out-of-your-seat moves which leave you shaking your head in wonder. There were a fair few of those in this weekend’s Heineken Cup action, led by Harlequin Danny Care’s brilliant backwards, mid-air flick which stopped the ball from going into touch and sent it safely into the hands of Matt Hopper, who raced in for a try against Clermont.Not to be outdone, George North scorched in for another fabulous solo try, swatting tacklers aside as he rampaged up the left wing to help Northampton to a 29-17 win at the Ospreys. His compatriot Kristian Phillips conjured up another special score in the Scarlets’ excellent 19-13 win at Racing Metro, leaving five defenders clutching the air in his wake. And Charlie Sharples, the Gloucester wing who was axed from England’s EPS last week, turned a half-chance into a try with a terrific, weaving run through the Munster defence to give the home fans something to cheer in a 20-7 defeat at Kingsholm.Gentleman, we take our hats off to you!Cool rulesThere will be a fight to the finish in the so-called pool of death, Heineken Cup Pool One, but Leinster put themselves in poll position to win it with a 29-22 away win at Castres. Some of the French players were in tears at the final whistle, having given up a 14-0 lead, but they were up against a Leinster side which is full of character and talent and which had already won at the Ospreys and Northampton in this season’s European competition.Jimmy Gopperth pulled the strings in the Leinster revival, scoring two tries, kicking 11 points and punishing Castres for every mistake, while Shane Jennings and Cian Healy both galvanised the pack from the bench. Leinster now need just one point from their clash with the Ospreys next Friday.Miles betterHe missed the whole of last season due to a neck injury, but Miles Benjamin is making up for lost time in a big way now and scored two tries in Leicester’s 34-19 win at Benetton Treviso. The wing moved from Worcester to the Tigers in 2012 but had to wait until October 2013 to play for the Leicester first team. Since then he’s scored four Heineken Cup tries and another in the Premiership, proving the best may be yet to come from the 25-year-old speedster.last_img read more

Read More →

Todd Clever: “Major League Rugby has been the missing link for USA”

first_imgAn expanding pro league, a winning Eagles team and talk of a World Cup stateside. Former USA captain Todd Clever explains why there’s a positive vibe in American rugby Taking off: the USA team finally has a professional foundation from which to build success (Inpho) Blaine Scully, the ex-Leicester and Cardiff Blues wing, is the captain and the only man in the squad currently without a club. That’s if you discount Madison Hughes, Martin Iosefo and Ben Pinkelman, who are part of the USA Sevens squad that came so spectacularly close to winning last season’s HSBC World Series.Must dash: Blaine Scully is captain of a USA side hoping to make some dents at Japan 2019 (Getty Images)However, Samu Manoa, once such a formidable force with Northampton Saints, has retired from international rugby having initially been named in Gold’s training squad. The 34-year-old, now playing for Seattle Seawolves, last played for his country in the defeat to Ireland last autumn that ended the team’s nine-match winning run.After their six-try triumph against Canada, the Eagles continue their Pacific Nations Cup campaign in Suva against Samoa and Japan. They meet Canada again in a Vancouver friendly on 7 September before launching their World Cup in Kobe on 26 September against England, who they met in the 1987, 1991 and 2007 tournaments. France, Argentina and Tonga complete their Pool C opponents.Great hit: Paul Emerick tackles Jason Robinson during USA’s clash with England at RWC 2007 (AFP)Brett Gosper, World Rugby’s chief executive, has said that a USA bid to stage the Rugby World Cup in 2027 or 2031 is now likely and would be “highly attractive”, not least because of the broadcast revenues it would bring. That is music to the ears of Clever.“To be part of something like that, to attract that, would be massive. In 1994 the USA hosted the Soccer World Cup and that changed the landscape of soccer here, the MLS is very strong.“So if we’re able to put in a bid for 2027 or 2031 and have a World Cup in the States, it would be massive. You would have a huge spike in commercials and sponsorships and fill stadiums because of what a huge draw the Rugby World Cup brings. It’s the third-largest sporting event in the world and for us to capitalise that and to turn Americans into rugby fans, and see the cultures and values it has, would be huge.”Big support: home fans would fill the stadiums if the USA hosted a World Cup, says Clever (Clicks Images)At 36, Clever could technically still be involved as a player but he’s happy adjusting to life as a former pro. His extensive CV includes a record 51 Tests as USA captain, World Cups in 2007 and 2011, and contracts in England, Japan and New Zealand – he was the first American to play Super Rugby.“I’ve been a full-time athlete for 15-plus years and the transition has been pretty smooth; family enjoyment, spending time with my daughter, travelling. I’m still heavily involved in rugby as you can tell on the Major League side of things and also the USA Rugby board, and I also have the opportunity to work with some amazing companies.“For example, I’m a brand ambassador for SleepScore Labs. I was using the app for almost a year before it was official, so I’m a user. I know how important sleep is, being a father and going through the motions of ‘You have a big day tomorrow’, but every day could be a big day and that should start with a good night’s sleep. Working with them is close to my heart because leading a healthy and happy life is important to me.” New opportunities: his rugby playing days behind him, Todd Clever is keen to promote healthy livingClever will be in Japan to see if USA can ruffle some feathers. They have only won three World Cup games in their history and lost all four pool games last time. Their easiest-looking match in Japan, against Tonga, comes just four days after they play Argentina. No one is expecting miracles at RWC 2019 – but the feel-good factor stateside is unmistakable.Spreading the word: Clever with students in LA during the Rugby World Cup Trophy Tour (World Rugby)Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.center_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Todd Clever: “Major League Rugby has been the missing link for USA”All smiles for Uncle Sam. A 47-19 defeat of Canada this weekend maintained USA’s upward trajectory under head coach Gary Gold ahead of the World Cup in Japan. Since Gold took charge at the start of 2018, the Eagles have won 13 out of 15 Tests, including an historic victory over Tier One opponents (Scotland) last summer.“Those wins have come on the back of a lot of hard work and the foundation that USA Rugby has put in,” says Todd Clever, the country’s most celebrated player with a record 76 caps before he retired in 2017. “Gary has instilled a great culture within the squad; they’re playing with cause and he’s reaping the benefits of the work that has gone in.“Great culture” Head coach Gary Gold is getting results (Sportsfile/Getty)“And especially now with Major League Rugby (MLR) taking place here and having our athletes as full-time rugby players, along with players scattered across Europe and the southern hemisphere, that’s a major part of the success.“Major League Rugby has been the missing link in our pyramid scheme of getting international rugby. We had a national team and then we had amateur university rugby all the way to youth rugby; our best players, and we’ve only had about ten, 12 guys at most, had the opportunities to play top-level rugby and the rest of the team was made up with teachers or plumbers or painters or whatever, playing part-time rugby. But now we’re fielding a whole squad and we have over 100 American full-time rugby players (to choose from), which is raising the bar.”MLR, a nation-wide professional club competition, has been going for two years, with Seattle Seawolves emerging as champions in both finals to date after nail-biting wins against Glendale Raptors and San Diego Legion.Growth spurt: Utah Warriors and Houston SaberCats compete in an MLR match (Icon Sportswire/Getty)The competition will expand to 12 clubs next season and, increasingly, is attracting household names from Europe. Ben Foden, who plays for Rugby United New York, has likened the standard to the top of the RFU Championship but it will only grow stronger. Mathieu Bastareaud is joining New York for next year’s competition while Steffon Armitage and Dom Day are linking up with San Diego Legion.“It’s exciting times for the league, with a lot of interest from overseas,” says Clever, a board member of USA Rugby. “One of the attractions is living in the States, playing in the States, travelling to great cities like San Diego, Seattle, New York, all cities that have teams.Sure-footed: Todd Clever in action against Russia during the 2011 World Cup in New Zealand (Getty)“For the guys coming here, it may not be the same salary that they’re used to in Europe or in the southern hemisphere, but they’re enjoying the rugby and there are opportunities for commercial sponsorships. That’s some of the conversations I’m having with them, the agents that are bringing the players over; the contracts aren’t worth bragging about but the opportunity to work with companies is what matters.“So we see a very bright future for MLR. There’s a process of educating the general public on the league and professionalism. People will grow up with it. Once we’re turning sports fans into rugby fans, with its family entertainment, it’s great to see the strides and opportunities.“In ten or 12 years’ time the MLR I’m hoping will be one of the best competitions in the world, and showered with the best players in the world, from the southern hemisphere, Europe, all over. And obviously USA Rugby will benefit, the national team will benefit from that strength.”The US Eagles have spent the past month in camp in Colorado Springs and Glendale, and with all players now full-time, the coaches are pleased to be working from a higher fitness base.last_img read more

Read More →

Lions squad receive Covid vaccinations

first_img Tadhg Furlong and Hamish Watson at the Lions’ administration day (Inpho) Lions squad receive Covid vaccinations Players in the British & Irish Lions 2021 squad have received their first Covid-19 vaccinations ahead of this summer’s tour to South Africa.The Lions were given the green light by the Government to get vaccinated and players received their jabs at the first squad get-together in London today. The Telegraph report that they are likely to get their second dose of the vaccine during the training camp in Jersey in June.All bar one of the 37 players selected for this year’s tour attended the Lions’ administration day at the Lensbury Hotel and have now been vaccinated. Scotland fly-half Finn Russell was absent due to his club commitments with Racing 92 but he has already received his first dose in France.Lions lock Maro Itoje signs a shirt during the squad get-together (Inpho)South Africa is currently on the UK’s ‘red list’, with fears of another wave of the pandemic as Covid cases in the country rise.LIONS 2021 LATEST NEWSMeetings, photo shoots and shirt signings were also on the agenda as the Lions squad met up for the first time.As the youngest member of the squad, Louis Rees-Zammit was given the responsibility of looking after the tour mascot, a cuddly lion called BIL. The tour party will next assemble on 13 June in Jersey, although any players involved in the Gallagher Premiership semi-finals, Rainbow Cup final and Greene King IPA Championship play-off will not join up with the squad until their club commitments are completed.The Lions play Japan in a pre-tour Test at BT Murrayfield on Saturday 26 June before departing for their eight-match tour of South Africa, which includes a three-Test series against the world champions.Related: British & Irish Lions 2021 FixturesThose matches in July and August will all be played in either Gauteng or Cape Town to reduce travel and limit the risks associated with the Covid pandemic. Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Players got their jabs at administration day get-together in Londonlast_img read more

Read More →

Canada: Fresh ideas for church structure, finances elude church council

first_img [Anglican Journal] Emerging from daylong discussions on May 25 about the future of the Anglican Church of Canada, members of the Council of General Synod (CoGS) appeared to lack ideas about what the next steps should be.In fact, members expressed feeling “overwhelmed” by the question of how to renew church structures.Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, said that instead of hearing new ideas, he heard a lot of familiar ones following reports coming out of small group discussion. Further, he said he wasn’t convinced that members were grasping the urgency of our situation.“We need to address [the issue] of finances and structure…I felt at times we were going up to it and then we stepped back,” said Hiltz. “Things must change if we’re going to go ahead in the spirit of the Marks of Mission.”Members had been divided into small, more intimate type of dialogue known as “World Café” as part of the Council’s goal to “consider clear directions and a plan for the efficient utilization of financial, staff and structural resources in the achievement of the priorities and practices set aside in Vision 2019.”Hiltz acknowledged that the intent was merely “to open the conversation and identify the challenges we face.” More focused conversations and courses of action are expected in meetings leading up to the 2013 Joint Lutheran-Anglican National Assembly.Members were asked to consider the following questions:How might God be using the current financial situation of General Synod to tell us about our future in carrying out Vision 2019?What might the Holy Spirit be telling us about ourselves as we grapple with the complexities of our current governance and structural challenges?How might Jesus be leading us on a journey of spiritual renewal through the presence of indigenous peoples among us, and their witness in the Mississauga Declaration.Some themes emerged. In conversations about finance, members prescribed that General Synod, the church’s governing body, “clearly and proactively articulate its unique mission and ministry” to Anglicans across Canada. Stewardship education is “essential” in helping improve the church’s financial stability, they said. Some members expressed a desire to “reframe current discussions” around finances, emphasizing that Anglicans must move from “a taxpayer to citizen mentality.” The church is not the national office in Toronto but “all local ministry in Canada,” and it is “a community not a bureaucracy,” they said.On the issue of governance, members said they “felt overwhelmed” because of the “complexity” of the structures.  Some said there is no mechanism to evaluate what’s in place, while others said future structures need to be “nimble and flexible.” There are structures that are “working well,” but members also recognize that in some places, they need to be overhauled due to financial constraints. Significant changes that are taking place in some parts of the church have been largely inspired and ushered in by indigenous ministries, others noted.Members said they have learned a lot about spirituality and renewal through General Synod’s partnership with the Anglican Council of Indigenous Peoples (ACIP).  Others said that lack of knowledge about the partnership has impeded growth in the relationship. Some “resisted grouping all non-indigenous people together,” the report added.Council members had an opportunity to speak further when they formed a sacred circle after the reports were heard. A number noted that there was more “openness” in the life of the church.Archbishop Colin Johnson observed that Council wrestled with issues “in a way that moved from blame and despair into much more engaged, if not hopeful and forward-looking” mode. Johnson, who is diocesan bishop of Toronto and metropolitan of the ecclesiastical province of Ontario, said he came away from the discussions “far less dispirited and much more energized about the opportunities God has given us.” The church “is not any more broken than it ever was,” he added.Ron Chaplin (Diocese of Ottawa) said it was “more than fortuitous” that CoGS was discussing the church’s future on the eve of Pentecost. “We are approaching the cusp of profound change. What that looks like is not clear,” said Chaplin. But he reminded CoGS to be hopeful, citing that Jesus himself had said, “the wind blows where it wishes, and you hear its sound, but you do not know where it comes from or where it goes. So it is with everyone who is born of the Spirit (John 3:8).”Martha Gardner, Episcopal Church partner to CoGs, challenged Council members to think in terms of “God’s mission and God’s church” and not “our church.” She said the question is, “How can we get out of ourselves and get a sense of where we need to go, where God is leading us?”— Marites N. Sison is staff writer for the Anglican Journal. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canada: Fresh ideas for church structure, finances elude church council Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Tags The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Bath, NC center_img Rector Albany, NY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release By Marites N. SisonPosted May 29, 2012 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Youth Minister Lorton, VAlast_img read more

Read More →

NORTHERN MICHIGAN: Diocese finds its voice

first_imgNORTHERN MICHIGAN: Diocese finds its voice Rector Hopkinsville, KY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Hiawathaland/ Episcopal News Service] Access to health and dental care, elder care and educating young people topped the discussion during “Finding our Voice,” a one-day conference on issues affecting residents of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula held at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Marquette in mid-September.Sponsored by the Diocese of Northern Michigan’s Peace and Justice Committee, the fifth annual conference aimed at an interfaith discussion on religion and politics was intended to help set the agenda for further action in the year ahead. More than sixty people, including state legislators and philanthropic leaders, gathered to explore the issues, advocacy and action“The very fact that people of different religions and different parties can get together and civilly discuss issues that affect everyone is part of the huge piece that we hope to continue,” said Jean Mather, a member of the Peace and Justice Committee and of St. Alban’s Episcopal Church in Manistique, in a telephone interview with ENS. “Each person from the Episcopal Church is going to go back to their congregation and spread the word and help in clarifying issues before elections — who stands where on what.”One of the primary ways that the Episcopal Church in Northern Michigan, which includes 25 congregations, lives out the fourth of the Five Marks of Mission (seeking to transform unjust structures in society) is by hosting conferences that encourage advocacy and action of its members as citizens.“Finding Our Voice” gathered people from different faith traditions and political persuasion to have a conversation.  “The hope of the justice and peace committee of the diocese was to raise the awareness of issues that are dear to our hearts. … The goal was to gather a common vision that did not separate humanity into factions, but to seek to transform the unjust structures of society. Participants had the opportunity to explore what they could do to take positive action, and our diocese will continue that conversation at our diocesan convention in October,” said Bishop Rayford Ray in an e-mail message to ENS.With 300,000 people spread out over more than 16,000 square miles, it is often difficult for residents living in rural areas to access resources. And even where present, obstacles persist.For example, Mather explained that some dental clinics will only see one patient from a family at a time, meaning if three children from the same family all need dental care, they cannot see a dentist on the same day. The clinics can be a long drive away, making it hard for families to get there; which has led to the clinics, in fear of more one cancellation, to make the rule.The themes for this year’s conference came directly from the communities, said Dennis West, a member of the Peace and Justice Committee and the president of Northern Initiatives, a private, nonprofit community development corporation that provides rural entrepreneurs with access to capital, information and markets.In a telephone interview with ENS, West explained that the conference’s workshops were designed to educate the attendees on all dimensions of the issues, to understand data needs and limitations, and to go beyond education into action.Michigan Democratic Senators Carl Levin and Debbie Stabenow each sent video messages of encouragement to the more than 60 people gathered at St. Paul’s. Levin reminded those gathered that in the same way that the nation came together in the wake of the 9/11 attacks, people need to come together today in the name of seeking justice.  Stabenow reflected on the good work that many people are already doing, working together, and shared that she keeps a reminder quote from Helen Keller on her refrigerator:  “I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something;  and because I cannot do everything I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.”Rob Collier, president and CEO of the Council of Michigan Foundations, offered stories and inspiration for people seeking to make a difference in their community.“We tell stories to one another to teach, persuade, and understand our life and context,” he said.Collier shared stories of the impact of giving in the state of Michigan, and the importance of helping people to understand that they can make a difference.“We want to include and involve everyone,” he said.  He especially emphasized the philanthropic impact of youth; each year youth in Michigan raise and give $2.5 million. “We need to involve youth in the conversation and decision-making about their Michigan.”Collier went on to share stories of creative and innovative partnerships that are reshaping the response to needs in our state, such as the Double Up program that helps people receiving state food assistance to make use of farmers markets for produce, and a partnership that is helping families save for home ownership in a way that helps to make them successful home owners long term.Leaders from Jewish, Christian, and Unitarian Universalist backgrounds shared their experience with issues of health care, education and end-of-life care.  They told stories of people forced to make choices about whether their child was sick enough to go to the emergency room when they had no medical insurance, of the ethical choices that our medical system presents as people decide whether the medical care adds to the quality of life or merely prolongs it and of how their faith tradition helps them make decisions when faced with challenging issues.Harvey Wallace, interim dean of the College of Professional Studies at Northern Michigan University, and speaking from a Jewish faith tradition, said “Does Jewish law mandate universal health care?  There are many different answers, but I think yes. We have an obligation to care for others with whom we live…there is a passage in Exodus that reminds us to be ‘kind to the stranger, for we were strangers in a strange land.’”Lutheran Bishop Tom Skrenes and retired Lutheran Advocacy Director Ben Baldus reminded listeners to broaden the circle of care to include all in need: elderly, children, immigrants, and prison populations.A panel on legislative issues addressed the challenges of health care, dental care, education and end-of-life care.  State Representatives Ed McBroom (R) and Steve Lindberg (D) shared personal stories of family health care. Both representatives affirmed the importance of working across the political aisle to work on solving the issues, especially health care, before us.“We should be having conversations just like this, all across the country.  Sharing our ideas across the political spectrum so that we can be heard and find solutions to the problems that we face as a country,” said Dr. Richard Armstrong of Newberry, a local chapter president the conservative, national organization the Docs4Patient Care.— Rïse Thew Forrester is Northern Michigan’s ministry developer, and editor of The Church in Hiawathaland. Lynette Wilson, editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service, contributed to this story. Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments (1) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Fr. Charles W. V. Daily says: Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Comments are closed. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC center_img An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Advocacy Peace & Justice Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA By Rïse Thew Forrester Posted Oct 9, 2012 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska October 9, 2012 at 1:33 pm MINISTRY IN ACTION. Rector Knoxville, TN Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Job Listinglast_img read more

Read More →

Empowering Episcopalians and the next generation to care for creation

first_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Deb Sprague says: April 14, 2015 at 10:10 pm I am heartened to read this article about Episcopalians addressing the urgency of the climate crisis. One missing piece is any discussion of the power of divesting from fossil fuels. The World Council of Churches, the United Church of Christ, Anglican dioceses in Australia/New Zealand, Episcopal dioceses in the U.S., and many other religious bodies have spoken out about the moral and financial reasons to divest from fossil fuels and have made a commitment to divest (for a list of groups that have divested, visit http://gofossilfree.org/commitments/).Divesting from fossil fuels is a way of withdrawing the social license of the fossil fuel industry. And it is a moral act: if it is wrong to wreck the Earth, it is also wrong to profit from that wreckage. Unlike engaging in stockholder advocacy, divesting gets to the heart of the problem: the core business of the fossil fuel industry — extracting and burning coal, gas, and oil — needs to stop. In order to avert climate chaos, fossil fuels must stay in the ground and we must move as quickly as possible to clean, safe, renewable sources of energy, such as wind and sun.Archbishop Desmond Tutu, who knows first-hand about the spiritual, political, and moral power of divestment, has repeatedly urged divestment from fossil fuels. When will the Episcopal Church make a plan to divest from fossil fuels? I hope that we pass a strong divestment resolution at General Convention. Advocacy Peace & Justice, April 18, 2015 at 4:01 pm Thank you for this heartening article. I would like to share that the Diocese of Connecticut is proposing to General Convention the addition of a 6th question to the Baptismal Covenant: “Will you cherish the wondrous works of God and protect the beauty and integrity of all creation?” Please share the news of this proposal with your bishops and convention deputies and work with us to make sure it is carried. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY April 13, 2015 at 10:31 am Hi, I appreciate this article, but feel we’ve got to move beyond talk about recycling to the underlying issues of our economy based on consumption. Consumers see only a fraction of waste related to the products purchased. We need to advocate for zero waste systems, green chemistry and reclaiming government’s allegiance to the people over corporations! Josh Thomas says: Anne Rowthorn says: Josh Thomas says: May 8, 2015 at 9:56 am To Margaret Bullitt-Jonas:You go first and set the example. Give up what ever part of your lifestyle has at its root fossil fuels. Let’s start with your clothes. If any of your apparel is synthetic, get rid of it for it is derived from fossil fuels. If it is cotton, unless you hand planted it yourself, harvested it by hand, processed it without modern tools, sewed it by hand using thorns for needles and flint for cutting fabric then you are not setting a very good example. If you drive any vehicle that is not a Flintsone auto or one you personally crafted from recycled materials and powered by wind or gravity, then you are not setting a very good example. Electric vehicle you say? All the materials used to fabricate any vehicle of transport was born of the utilization of fossil fuels. Even the electricity used to power your electric car or bicycle is generated from fossil fuel. Oh, and the degradation of efficiency from using gasoline to the generation, transport, and storage (batteries) of electricity is significant. The pollution caused in the manufacture of batteries alone will cause you to shudder.If you are serious about divestment from fossil fuels, you will not possess anything that is derived from fossil fuels. Since you seem so adamant about this divestment from fossil fuels, you must already have an alternative source of energy in mind and in use. Please let the rest of us in on your secret.I personally believe that the existence of of all the earth’s resources were part of God’s plan for the benefit of mankind. Man is as much a part of nature as the polar bears that your ilk like to reference in your doomsday climate chaos hysteria. By the way, the polar bears are flourishing like never before and the caribou in Alaska are thriving in the shadow of the pipeline.Real science agrees that climate change is real and has been since creation began and will continue to happen despite our attempts to control it. What is being sold by the politicians is climate hysteria for the purpose of controlling the masses, not the preservation of the earth – God will take care of that as He always has.But I have no doubt that you will stay the course on your ‘group think’ journey and will have many followers. I will not be one of them. Comments are closed. April 13, 2015 at 12:37 pm Historical footnote, for the record: Howard knew within a couple of weeks that “this fragile earth, our island home” was a hit; Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin had landed on the moon only five years earlier. And Howard knew that the environmental theme also resonated quickly; the first Earth Day happened in 1970. But the thing he was proudest of in that prayer was that it’s the first in Anglican history to invoke the Blessed Virgin Mary as part of the consecration. By far his proudest moment in the overall, decades-long process of Prayer Book revision was winning final approval for the most important provision of all: the rubric on p. 13 terming the Holy Eucharist “the principal act of Christian worship on the Lord’s Day.” For the first time since the Reformation, Sunday Mass was restored to its rightful place in Anglican worship. This Church owes Howard Galley and everyone associated with Prayer Book revision the highest honor we can bestow. People think that what the ’79 Book did was get rid of “thees and thous,” but that was the least of it. The Commission, Bishops and Deputies gave us back our Communion with Christ, and we must never forget what they did. This Book made history because it made us Catholic again, in practice as well as thought. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA April 13, 2015 at 6:36 pm Fascinating information. I love Eucharistic Prayer C, the words and the ’79 BCP. Thanks for the wonderful insights. Tags Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Josh Thomas says: Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR April 13, 2015 at 10:55 am Howard E. Galley, Jr. of the Church Army wrote those words, not Bishop Atkinson. I was present the first time they were used to consecrate bread and wine at the Eucharist, in a classroom at General Seminary, New York, in the summer of 1974. The Rev. Bill Coulter celebrated for my Church Army training class; Capt. Galley, Sr. Brooke Bushong and Capt. Tom Tull were there along with six lay ministry students, including Anthony Guillen, who was later ordained and became Hispanic/Latino Missioner at 815. Howard told us after Mass how he came to write that prayer, late one night at 815 after one of our evening classes. He wrote it all in one sitting, then refined it with Brooke and a few other friends a few nights later at a bar in Brooklyn Heights. He was Assistant to the Coordinator for Prayer Book Revision and General Editor of the new BCP, the day-to-day staffer who kept the wheels turning for the Standing Liturgical Commission in the runup to the General Convention of 1976, at which the Draft Prayer Book was provisionally approved for three years before winning final approval in 1979. Howard Galley wrote that prayer and no one else. On his behalf I respectfully request a correction. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Albany, NY An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME center_img Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Doug Desper says: By Lynette Wilson Posted Apr 13, 2015 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Students from Campbell Hall and St. Margaret’s Episcopal Schools observe elephant seals during mating season on the coast of Big Sur, California. From birth to death and everything in between, the full cycle of life was on display. Photo: Diocese of Los Angeles[Episcopal News Service] Episcopalians old and young often turn to the phrase “this fragile earth, our island home” when talking about stewardship of the planet. It comes from Eucharistic Prayer C, found in the Book of Common Prayer.A little further down the page, the prayer continues: “You made us the rulers of creation. But we turned against you, and betrayed your trust; and we turned against one another.”Over the last 21 days, Episcopalians have been participating in 30 Days of Action, a campaign designed and initiated by the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society to engage individuals and congregations in a conversation about climate change. (The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission.)The campaign, which began with a live, webcast forum on March 24, culminates on Earth Day, April 22. Resources and activities for the campaign include advocacy days, bulletin inserts, stories, sermons and outdoor excursions.The 30 Days of Action, as well as the fifth of the Five Marks of Mission, are a call to action to regain that trust and to come together in community to care for creation.As James Pickett, a climate-change activist and young adult from the Diocese of Western Massachusetts, makes clear in a recent blog post, unless Anglicans and Episcopalians take seriously the fifth of the Five Marks of Mission, “To strive to safeguard the integrity of creation, and sustain and renew the life of the earth,” the other four marks are irrelevant.“If we don’t treasure creation, the other marks of mission cannot be accomplished,” wrote Pickett.Just talking about climate change and its related justice issues doesn’t cut it, according to Pickett and others; it’s about living the marks and putting faith into action.Last fall, Pickett and other Episcopalians joined the more than 300,000 people from across the country and the world on the streets of New York for the People’s Climate March, the largest demonstration for climate action in history.As evidenced in the activities and resources included and developed for the 30-day campaign, it’s impossible to have a conversation about climate change and not talk about justice issues implicit in the Five Marks of Mission.“When The Episcopal Church adopted the Five Marks of Mission, I was struck by the practical nature of the language and its action-oriented invitation,” said lifelong environmentalist Bronwyn Clark Skov, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s officer for youth ministries. “I am especially thankful for the specificity of the Fifth Mark of Mission, ‘to strive to safeguard the integrity of creation and sustain and renew the life of the earth.’”“It could be argued that this area of ministry is an undercurrent of the Baptismal Covenant, but these newer words open greater possibilities for imagining our role as Christian citizens caring for the earth, our home,” she said. “This is a wonderful teaching point when engaged with young people and discussing how their Christian identity might impact the choices they make.”An environmentalist since her father encouraged her as a child, Skov recalled learning about recycling early on.“I remember sorting newspapers to drop off at the once-a-month newspaper drive. I was taught to rinse out tin cans, remove both ends and carefully flatten the can on the rug on the kitchen floor, so as not to damage the linoleum beneath the woven fabric,” she said. “When engaged in ministry with young people, I name and claim this lifelong habit and invite young people to join me in my commitment to reduce, recycle and reuse those items that will not easily biodegrade in a landfill. This behavior has become a part of who I am, a piece of my personal identity.”The Five Marks of Mission begin to address how Episcopalians can become environmental stewards and turn toward one another in community, rather than betraying the earth and turning away from one another, as the eucharistic prayer states.Children and teenagers especially feel empowered by the language used in the marks, said Skov. She refers to them as a way to practice the vows made at baptism, and she invites young people to name and claim the ways in which they are already living some of the marks.“The beauty of the fifth mark, treasuring the earth with intentionality, is a place where we can engage in our communities in partnership across denominational, religious and political divides,” she said. “Mission and ministry in this area [are] easy to embrace with school-age humans as they learn about the environment in classroom settings and can then see the intersection of their secular experience in the world with their values as a member of a community of faith.”More than 1,000 high school-aged students attended last year’s Episcopal Youth Event in Pennsylvania, where climate change was among the issues discussed and where youth were becoming agents of transformation.Americans’ views on climate change vary from state to state, town to town and sometimes family member to family member. Climate change is an increasingly charged political issue that often pits conservatives against liberals. At the same time, religious communities across the spectrum have joined in the call to reduce carbon emissions and to treat climate change as a moral issue.In an interview with The Guardian that ran on the day of the climate-change-crisis forum in March, Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori described climate change as a moral challenge already threatening the livelihood and survival of people in the developing world.“It is certainly a moral issue in terms of the impacts on the poorest and most vulnerable around the world already,” she said.Across the board, Episcopalians are taking that moral challenge seriously, including by contributing to the 30 Days of Action.As the Rev. Margaret Bullitt-Jonas, missioner for creation care in the Diocese of Western Massachusetts, put it in a sermon written for the Sunday after Easter: “Climate change isn’t just an ‘environmental’ issue – it’s a ‘civilization’ issue. It’s not just about polar bears – it’s about where our grandchildren will find clean water. It’s about how societies will handle growing epidemics of infectious diseases such as malaria, cholera and dengue fever. It’s about where masses of people will go as rising seas drive them from their homes or when the rains don’t fall and the fields turn to dustbowls. It’s about hungry, thirsty people competing for scarce resources and reverting to violence, civil unrest or martial law in the struggle to survive.”Formation resources focused on creation careThe Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s Lifelong Christian Formation Office and other clergy and lay Episcopalians active on climate-change issues have compiled comprehensive resources for environmental liturgy, including the 30 Days of Action.“The formation offices have been talking about climate change and caring for the environment with children and their families for years,” said the Rev. Shannon Kelly, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s acting missioner for campus and young adult ministries.“Young people encounter caring for the environment every day as they talk about recycling, ‘upcycling’ and conservation in their schools, at home and at church. Bringing this important subject into the life of the church and into the programs creates space for the children and adults to think, pray and experience how caring for the environment is caring for God’s creation.”Environmental Stewardship Fellow Cindy Coe works in the garden with students of the Episcopal School of Knoxville. Photo courtesy of Episcopal School of KnoxvilleIn Tennessee, exploring nature is becoming an integral component of learning to read.In early June, the Diocese of East Tennessee will offer “Reading Camp Knoxville” to third- and fourth-graders who are both living in poverty and struggling to learn to read. As part of the program, the children, who come from urban areas, will go on afternoon field trips, hiking in wooded areas working in gardens, said Cindy Coe, who is on the planning committee and working with afternoon extracurricular activities.“All of these activities are geared to fostering a sense of connectedness and appreciation of the natural world. The best way to do this is to actually get children outdoors, exploring nature,” said Coe, who last year received an environmental-stewardship fellowship from the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society.Through the fellowship, Coe is working to develop the next generation of leaders.“This is not something that can be done by ‘book learning’ only,” she said. “Activities that encourage children to look closely at natural objects, mapping activities and identifying a special place outdoors are all effective ways to help children bond with nature. If a child is able to develop a bond with nature, chances are that the child will grow up with an appreciation of the environment and will care for the environment as an adult.”Coe is working on developing new resources to introduce creation care to children and youth in The Episcopal Church, for use in camps, schools and parishes.She hopes, she said, that all Christian formation programs in The Episcopal Church eventually will include some aspect of environmental stewardship.In Virginia, Coe also is working with the planning team of Emmanuel Episcopal Church in Greenwood, Virginia, to design a vacation Bible school program based on care for creation and the Fifth Mark of Mission called “Earth, Our Island Home.”The parish takes seriously the words “this fragile Earth, our island home” in Eucharistic Prayer C, said Coe.“So the concept of creation care has a special meaning for the parish,” she said. “ Each day, children will participate in worship, hear a story based on creation care and take part in noncompetitive games designed to introduce environmental stewardship.”Arts and crafts will embrace environmental stewardship, as children will be offered objects to “upcycle” and make into new creations, she said. “New life will be an important theme of the camp, connecting themes of recycling, composting and gardening with the Christian story of resurrection and new life in Christ.”In the Diocese of Los Angeles, where the Rev. Andrew K. Barnett serves as the bishop’s chair for environmental studies, young people are learning to care for creation by learning to love it.“I think that we will not fight to save a thing we do not love, by which I mean in order to empower people to care for ‘this fragile earth our island home,’ we first have to find that meaningful and valuable in a deep way, and talking about it doesn’t really cut it,” said Barnett, before the March 24 forum.“So I have really made a significant priority of taking kids outside. So we take these wilderness retreats to places like Big Sur, Lake Lopez, Yosemite and Catalina Island. We have games, we go kayaking, we go hiking, we do service projects,” he said.“The kids love it, they just love it. They light up because they are doing exactly what we need, which is community, connection and reference in these incredible, awe-inspiring places. So you don’t have to say this is important, this is beautiful, because it is immediately present or it’s just in your bones.”Barnett serves as school chaplain at Campbell Hall Episcopal School in the Diocese of Los Angeles, where Bishop J. Jon Bruno and the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society partnered to host the March 24 forumBarnett talks to the students about climate change in stark terms, incorporating research and science — not to exaggerate, he said, but to name the severity of the threat.“Kids can handle that truth. They don’t like things being sugar-coated. They prefer: ‘This is going to be the biggest challenge of your generation,’” said Barnett. “Our generation has abjectly failed in our attempt to reduce emissions. We talked about it a lot, we have a lot of meetings, but emissions keep going up.“If you fail at this task, most other tasks won’t matter, because climate change affects almost everything worth caring about and, other than nuclear annihilation, presents the greatest threat to humanity that we’ve ever known.”Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story misattributed the authorship of the words “this fragile Earth, our island home,” which appear in Eucharistic Prayer C. They were written by Howard E. Galley Jr.— Lynette Wilson is a reporter and editor for Episcopal News Service. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Empowering Episcopalians and the next generation to care for creation Press Release Service Margaret Bullitt-Jonas says: Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Bill Simon says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Deborah S. Taliaferro says: April 13, 2015 at 12:00 pm What Bishop Atkinson must have done was to quote Howard Galley’s phrase (and perhaps celebrate Mass using it) so often at Emmanuel, Greenwood, that in time people began to think he must have written it. Besides Fr. Guillen, I have another witness who was present during the creation of this prayer: Sr. Brooke Bushong’s partner Patti O’Kane, who still lives in Brooklyn Heights and can supply details about Howard, Brooke and others meeting for a drink a few nights after he composed the prayer. He read it to them, and they were the first persons to ever hear it; he asked for feedback and they gave him some. A few days later Fr. Bill Coulter gave it its world premiere in a little room at GTS. Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Youth Minister Lorton, VA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab April 17, 2015 at 12:53 pm While care for the natural creation (our island home) is being sought — and very rightly so — let us remember that there is a holocaust of the human family as seen through abortion in this country. Most abortions are not for the extremely rare incidence of a threat to the mother or the in vitro child’s life, which means that most abortions are performed for the sake of convenience. A past General Convention rejected the idea that such a decision for convenience or gender selection is acceptable. However, the left-leaning politics of the day dissuade many of our spiritual and pastoral leaders from stating that “freedom to choose” is a morally bankrupt basis to decide life from death. Quite the opposite shows itself; even with one seminary dean’s proud announcement that “abortion is a blessing”. The politics of gender won out over the call to be a steward of creation.This Church hasn’t awakened to the unborn creation and their vulnerability at the hands of situation ethics, gender politics, crisis of convenience, and ignorance. The unborn, as a part of the creation, are at much greater risk than many parts of the creation. God called us to be stewards of the whole of creation, not to be arbiters of the value of the life therein. Stewards. Caregivers. Guardians.Fellow stewards: where are our unwed mother supports? Where are our adoption efforts? Where are our homes for the abandoned? The track record of the Episcopal Church is abysmal in this. We are behind – and the MDGs have room to embrace better care of the unborn, untimely born, and vulnerable women. Are we stewards or arbiters? Watch our efforts and decide.Thankfully, many of today’s parents get to see the new life that is in the womb through imagining — and it is nearly impossible to defend such a casual and flippant idea as “freedom to choose”.It’s hard to deny the value of that tiny creation – someone that God has hidden away in trust to we who are called stewards of the WHOLE of creation.Maybe one day our Church will catch up. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Submit a Press Release Comments (9) Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Environment & Climate Change In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 last_img read more

Read More →

Theology professors press Sewanee to revoke Charlie Rose’s honorary degree…

first_img John Simpson says: Rector Albany, NY Rev Doris Westfall says: February 23, 2018 at 12:13 pm I thank Dorothy Vellom for taking the time to offer a measured rejoinder to my own comments. One may dispute my use of a particular term or two (e.g. “psychological difference”) but I think there can be no question that the trend in recent years has been to minimize male/female distinctions even to the absurd point these days of claiming that one’s gender should be treated as a matter of choice. (Indeed there are weirdos even in the Episcopal Church who are attempting to propagate this view!) As a traditionalist from Massachusetts I have always respected Sewanee for holding firm to a traditionalist perspective more mindful of history. Evidently things may have changed. But to illustrate the point about how in my view women these days are themselves partly responsible for the fact that people like the sophisticated Charlie Rose feel no compunction about mistreating lady acquaintances, I need point only to the exultation felt today over the U.S. women’s hockey team’s Olympic win as if adding another gold medal were all that counted. Aside from the fact that ice hockey is a very rough sport which can cause considerable body damage especially to women, is it unnatural that many reasonable males should resent the intrusion of women into yet another traditionally male sport? Charlie Rose may or may not himself have played hockey but one can understand how people with his kind of mentality may have forgotten (if they ever knew) that women deserve to be treated physically with perhaps a bit more respect than other males.Now I realize that the point I’m making might reduce me to being termed a male chauvinist pig who was born in the wrong century, but in an age when our traditional civilization is clearly under attack, I would respectfully ask for a slightly more sympathetic response than that. I still feel that the debate at Sewanee over the honorary degree awarded Charlie Rose should be broadened a bit. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Gender Justice Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS February 22, 2018 at 12:58 pm The Board dissembles in claiming, “We want to be clear that we have stood, and always will stand, against sexual harassment of women or men.” That may be the Board’s, and the University’s, official position. But the on-campus reality is that protection of sexual predators — and, worse, the placing of blame on those who have experienced sexual harassment/assault by fellow students, faculty and/or staff — has been upheld by this, and previous, administrations. Revoking Charlie Rose’s honorary degree would be only the first step in addressing this long-standing issue at Sewanee. Robert Warren Cromey says: Submit an Event Listing AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By David PaulsenPosted Feb 21, 2018 Rev Doris Westfall says: February 22, 2018 at 9:51 pm “Honorary Degrees awarded by the University are in recognition of unusual achievement by individuals whose services to the Church, to arts and letters, to science or to human society have advanced the principles for which the University stands.” (Ordinances of the University of the South, Ch 19, Sect 1)If this is truly the case, then the University needs to clearly define the principles for which it stands, and then closely examine whether Mr. Rose’s services to arts and letters, and human society, crafted as they were within his toxic work environment, truly advance those principles. Dorothy Vellom, Sewanee Class of 1989 Rector Knoxville, TN Tags Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Collierville, TN February 23, 2018 at 11:03 am I do agree in part with Tony Oberdorfer, as it certainly appears that “the principles for which the University stands” in this context are directly tied to financial benefit and increased publicity. That this be made transparent was the reason I suggested the University clearly define those principles – I perhaps should have added “for which the University actually, in practice, stands.”Whether any given recipient of an honorary degree from the University of the South is worthy of the honor goes directly back to defining those principles. I am hopeful that this discussion around revocation of an honorary degree will crack open the door to honest examination of the process by which those recipients have historically been selected, and allow the University to, at the very least, bring its actions in line with its published ordinances. My greater hope is that the University administration will recenter its actions, in this and every regard, on the principles for which the greater University family – faculty, staff, students, alumni, benefactors, and community – expect it to stand, principles such as honor, truth, respect, and justice.I find myself ill-equipped to respond to the final paragraph of the comment, simply because I have not ever subscribed to the feminist movement and therefore have no basis from which to engage in that discussion. There is a vast gulf between the belief, as stated, that “there are essentially no psychological differences between the sexes worthy of consideration” (a view I have never held and, quite frankly, have never heard voiced) and the belief that every human being is worthy of being treated with dignity and respect, a view to which I do subscribe. Anticipating probable responses to my having made that statement: yes, “every human being” includes those who do not treat others with dignity or respect; no, I do not think that revoking an honor for which the person is patently unworthy runs counter to that belief; and yes, the revocation of an honor can and should be done in a respectful and dignified manner, lest the University fail, once again, to uphold the principles her greater family expects of her. Given the context in which these discussions are playing out in the University and throughout the United States, no, I do not believe that another issue, however relevant it may be, is currently more worthy of debate. In this moment, the Vice Chancellor and the Board of Regents have the opportunity to listen and to act, to demonstrate that they truly desire and are working for the best for Sewanee and the entire University family, and ultimately to open the door further for additional discussions around related, but less time-sensitive, issues.Dorothy Vellom, Sewanee Class of 1989 Tony Oberdorfer says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Comments (22) February 21, 2018 at 11:28 pm I hope commenters have read the original letters linked from the Sewanee Purple and recommend the opinion piece from one of the students appearing in the Atlanta Journal Constitution http://www.myajc.com/blog/get-schooled/student-college-should-revoke-charlie-rose-honor-after-sexual-misconduct-charges/ux65g8UrS6mI20qvDJt1MP/. It does not bode well for the future of the Episcopal Church that it’s news service begins its coverage of this debacle with a headline about the theology professors- profound though their response was- instead of about the students, young women of faith, who are calling for change in their community. The kind of tone-deaf response that the Sewanee administration demonstrated and is echoed in some of these comments is an example of attitudes that result in the rejection of church by the coming generation. Anne Burton says: February 22, 2018 at 10:12 am Sewanee awarded Charlie Rose an honorary degree in recognition of the good he had done. That is a fact. That is history. Are we now to hide our history. I would venture that in its history, Sewanee has given degrees to bigots, rogues, thieves, and — shocking as the possibility may seem to the puritans pushing for reversal — unfaithful people. Did Sewanee make an error by not engaging an investigative company to do an extensive search for every dirty detail of every year of every honoree’s life? If we are only to honor perfect people, then we may as well print a batch with the same name: “Jesus Josephson.”Mr Rose had an outstanding career as a journalist. He also seems to have misused his relationship of power over a number of women. If that abuse had been known, one may hope he wouldn’t have been awarded that degree.History. Let anyone who wishes go through all the honorary degrees and make their list of who should and who should not have been given their degree. They were still awarded. The Rev Edwin Cox says: February 21, 2018 at 6:00 pm With Christ there is forgiveness. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rebecca Scheer says: Tony Oberdorfer says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC February 21, 2018 at 5:53 pm I can’t recall a single episode of someone being refused communion for a “notorious sin” by any cleric over the past forty or so years… and I’ve had murderers, thieves, bank robbers, and a bunch of adulterers amongst those I gave the sacraments to.Maybe an honorary degree is a different category… but on the other hand it’s a classic statement of the faith, that for membership in this body, “only sinners need apply.” Lisa Rung says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ February 23, 2018 at 9:33 am I think I agree with Dorothy Vellom though I can’t be sure she would agree with me. From his first appearance on the tube Charlie Rose was presented as commercial television’s gift to civilized discourse, an image he substantiated with his link to PBS even though he never gave up the huge income he received from commercial TV. So he had the best of both worlds so-to-speak. Colleges apparently benefit by competing with each other to award meaningless honorary degrees to the biggest “names.” I am cynical enough to believe that the decision makers at Sewanee figured the school would gain, perhaps financially, from the publicity it would receive from being associated with the name “Charlie Rose” even though by Sewanee’s own standards he really did not merit the honor any more than Oprah Winfrey was deserving of being similarly honored by Harvard. The unkindness Mr. Rose has evidently shown towards members of the opposite sex bespeaks his unworthiness as a human being and may deserve condemnation. But it is pathetic that the current discussion about Mr. Rose has focused entirely on whether or not his misbehavior should result in the revocation of his honorary degree rather than on whether or not he was worthy of the honor in the first place. One more thought: I do not question that every female by definition deserves respect and that men who abuse women physically should be severely sanctioned. But can there be any doubt that some of the problem of which Charlie Rose is just one example has been brought about by the aggressiveness of the feminist movement and its insistence that there are essentially no psychological differences between the sexes worthy of consideration? Is that issue not more worthy of debate than merely whether a long forgotten honorary degree should be rescinded? Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel SB Davenport says: Comments are closed. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Job Listing February 21, 2018 at 7:05 pm The women who were abused are the ones to grant forgiveness. And forgiveness does not mean that accountability goes out the window or that consequences are not imposed. No one has condemned his immortal soul. The theology taught by the “good people in the Department of Theology” is consistent with the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the historic understanding of sin and forgiveness taught by the church for 2000 years. February 21, 2018 at 6:33 pm Allegations do not make one a criminal. It appears that Salem is alive and well at Sewanee. Associate Rector Columbus, GA February 22, 2018 at 4:09 pm “Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness, for they shall be filled.” Matthew 5:6Lisa Rung Sewanee Class of 1990 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 M. Holloway says: February 21, 2018 at 5:36 pm Your demonizing or Mr. Rose only puts you in the gutter with his actions. Here’s a thought: since he is one of yours by virtue of the degree you gave him why not reach out and offer him your pastoral care and concern. That would not only be in the great Anglican tradition of pastoral care but also in the manner of the One who extended an open hand of concern and forgiveness to sinners. PJ Cabbiness says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service February 21, 2018 at 7:16 pm Yes, Rose is a sinner like the rest of us. Leave him alone. Why does Sewanee have to stoop to Media’s level of lack of compassion. Leave him alone. Take a stand on control instead. February 21, 2018 at 6:43 pm Rose asked for forgiveness. Should not it be the Church that is most likely to grant it? Sewanee was quite right in granting it and not rescinding the diploma. It makes one wonder what theology the good people in the Department of Theology is teaching? Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tony Oberdorfer says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release February 22, 2018 at 10:03 am And the Lord said, “Let he who is without sin cast the first stone.” There are no blameless, only those who have not been caught. And the are often the first to condemn. Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA February 21, 2018 at 6:41 pm Holding someone accountable for their actions is neither demonizing nor condemning them. Rescinding the honorary degree does not exclude a pastoral action being taken towards Mr. Rose. As a priest I would be brought before a disciplinary board on Title IV charges if my actions mirrored those of Mr. Rose. Asking that an individual be held accountable for their actions does not smack of McCarthyism or the Inquisition as PJ Crabbiness asserts. Accountability and compassion are not mutually exclusive of one another. And I find it very telling that in not one of the comments were the multiple women who were abused, harassed, or assaulted referenced or given the same consideration as Mr. Rose. Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Len Freeman says: Theology professors press Sewanee to revoke Charlie Rose’s honorary degree over scandal February 22, 2018 at 2:48 pm Forgiveness is a forever process. It is not a gift anyone can lightly dispense wholesale. Maybe this withdrawal of honor awarded for particular reasons has been too hair trigger—such a bad metaphor just now. Jackson Hill says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY February 21, 2018 at 5:38 pm Did we learn nothing from the Pharisees or McCarthyism? Rose is not a criminal. He is a flawed human being who behaved badly and is suffering the consequences. This Inquisition type zeal by Academics is troubling and short sighted. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 February 22, 2018 at 12:36 pm This is an unnecessary act to punish Mr. Rose. Haven’t you noticed that he has practically vanished? His name is not even mentioned anymore nor is he seen on television anywhere. The scandal virtually ruined his career and that alone would have punished him severely. Show some compassion and leave the man alone. What has happened to him is an example enough to those who may be flirting with predatory behavior at work. Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME February 21, 2018 at 8:07 pm Charlie Rose has from the start been a member in good standing of the media fraternity that has caused so much damage to our country. While pretending to have a higher calling he was in reality dedicated to enriching himself as egregiously as anyone. Sewanee should never have awarded him an honorary degree in the first place and probably was motivated largely by the publicity it would engender. I might have expected better from the University of the South which surely stands guilty of bad judgment. The Rev. Lyn G. Brakeman says: Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Dorothy Vellom says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Scott Albergate says: February 22, 2018 at 4:30 pm Not that this comments section sounds anything but informed and reasoned, but…– Sewanee has not revoked the honorary degree– the Theology faculty letter cited above was in response to the theological points made by the Board of Regents in their letter declining to rescind the honorary degree– these are not “allegations.” Mr. Rose has acknowledged his actions– there is a sexual assault crisis in colleges around the country, and students often feel there is no recourse for victims– the request to do so was initiated by undergraduates (whatever “zeal” one perceives is led by the undergraduates, many of whom know first-hand how difficult it is to bring a perpetrator to justice in a university setting)– and if you’re keeping score at home, an honorary degree is not an instrument of reconciliation or forgiveness in this Church [Episcopal News Service] Theology professors at Sewanee: The University of the South are joining a chorus of voices calling for the Tennessee university to revoke an honorary degree given to Charlie Rose because of sexual harassment allegations against the broadcast journalist.The letter, dated Feb. 19, is addressed to top Sewanee administrators and the university’s Board of Regents and is signed by eight professors – a majority of the faculty members in the School of Theology. They seek to frame their response “within the larger, theologically grounded tradition of pastoral response to sin and forgiveness” and dispute some of the theological justifications the school has made in resisting calls to revoke Rose’s honorary degree.The letter also invokes a recent message on sexual harassment issued by the Episcopal Church’s presiding bishop and House of Deputies president.“We pray that this university will have the courage to respond to this call, and that it will seek to demonstrate in symbol and in substance that it respects the dignity of every human being, and demands similar respect be shown by all whom it honors,” the professors say in their letter, posted online by the Sewanee Purple, a student-run news publication.Sewanee’s Episcopal roots date to its founding in 1857 by clergy and lay leaders from dioceses across the south. It continues to be owned and governed by 28 Episcopal dioceses and offers a full range of degrees, in addition to training future church leaders in its seminary.Rose was a top name in TV journalism through his “Charlie Rose” interview show on PBS and Bloomberg and his co-anchor role on “CBS This Morning” when harassment allegations surfaced in November. Eight women told the Washington Post that Rose made unwanted sexual advances toward them, including lewd comments, groping and walking around naked in their presence.Rose issued an apology for his “inappropriate behavior” and admitted he had “behaved insensitively at times,” though he also disputed the accuracy of some of the allegations. He was promptly fired by PBS, Bloomberg and CBS.Charlie Rose delivers the commencement address in May 2016 at Sewanee: The University of the South. Photo: SewaneeSewanee presented Rose with an honorary degree in spring 2016, when he delivered the university’s commencement address. “Fame is way overrated unless you do something good with it,” CBS News quoted Rose as saying in his speech to graduates.Rose was one of a series of prominent men from the world of entertainment, media and politics to suddenly fall from grace last year amid allegations of sexual misconduct, prompting women everywhere to share their own stories of harassment and abuse in what has been called the #MeToo movement. Some universities have responded by taking back past honors bestowed on Rose, including Arizona State University, Fordham University and State University of New York-Oswego.The Bairnwick Women’s Center at Sewanee started an online petition in December calling for Sewanee to revoke Rose’s honorary degree, the Sewanee Purple reported, and early this month, two of the university’s student trustees, Claire Brickson and Mary Margaret Murdock, spoke to the Board of Regents recommending the board take that step.“Revoking Charlie Rose’s degree sends a clear statement to those 17 individuals who reported rapes on campus in 2016, that we support their decision to come forward,” Brickson and Murdock told the Board of Regents, according to the Sewanee Purple.Four Episcopal bishops and three Episcopal priests sit on the 20-member Board of Regents, including Florida Bishop Samuel Howard, who serves as an ex officio board member because of his position as Sewanee chancellor. The regents responded last week in a letter to Brickson and Murdock saying they decided, after “vigorous discussion,” that Rose should keep his honorary degree.“We want to be clear that we have stood, and always will stand, against sexual harassment of women or men,” the board said. “At the same time, we do not believe it is our place to condemn the individual. In fact, we think there is grave danger were we to go down that path. We impose a penalty where appropriate, but we also offer forgiveness.”The Board of Regents also asserted “condemnation has no place here” before elaborating on its “ecclesiastical considerations” in the matter.“Clarification comes in the question ‘Is there a hierarchy of sin?’ Quickly followed by ‘Are we all not sinners?’ Therein lies the ecumenical rub,” the board’s letter said. “If we condemn a person then who among us sinners should not also be condemned?”Episcopal News Service sought comment Feb. 21 from the four bishops on the Board of Regents and was referred instead to Sewanee administrators. A spokeswoman said the university had no additional statement on the issue, though one may be issued later this week.The regents’ reasoning drew a direct rebuttal from the School of Theology professors in their letter.“Respectfully, we must insist that there is a hierarchy of sin, long recognized in the tradition,” the professors say. “In the gospels, Jesus himself makes such distinctions, and he forcefully censures those who place a ‘stumbling block’ before others – that is, create scandal that impedes faith.”The professors also cite the disciplinary rubric in the Book of Common Prayer that says clergy should prevent from taking communion those who are “living a notoriously evil life” and those “who have done wrong to their neighbors and are a scandal.”“Public scandal is, in the tradition, regarded as a reason to send a message,” the professors say. “One struggles to think of a case of public scandal more obvious than the behavior of Mr. Rose.”The professors also acknowledge the revoking Rose’s honorary degree is a mere symbolic act, though no more symbolic than granting him the degree in the first place.And they point for context to the Jan. 22 letter to the Episcopal Church from Presiding Bishop Michael Curry and the Rev. Gay Clark Jennings, president of the House of Deputies. Curry and Jennings called on Episcopalians to take the coming of Ash Wednesday and Lent as a time to meditate “on the ways in which we in the church have failed to stand with women and other victims of abuse and harassment and to consider, as part of our Lenten disciplines, how we can redouble our work to be communities of safety that stand against the spiritual and physical violence of sexual exploitation and abuse.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Jim Newman says: Featured Events Brian MacFarland says: Rector Washington, DC Dorothy Vellom says: Rector Belleville, IL last_img read more

Read More →

Apopka Weekly Arrest Report

first_img Apopka Police Department Arrest Report ~ Dec 27 – Jan 2The Apopka Police Department reported the following statistics for the week ending January 2nd: Calls For Service           1392Traffic Citations                 81Crash Reports                    20In addition, the Apopka Police Department reported 28 arrests for the week ending January 2nd.  No juveniles were arrested.Arrested and charged were 17 adults from Apopka, 2 adults from an unknown residence, 6 adults from Orlando, 1 adult from Miramar, 1 adult from Eatonville, and 1 adult from Deland.All of the arrests are listed here:LEONARD, SARDAL ARGAEON (23) of APOPKA – Multiple charges including Battery and Drug PossessionFEW, ANTHONY EDWARD (27) of APOPKA – Multiple charges including Drug Equipment PossessionMILES, MARIO C (37) of APOPKA – BatteryROBINSON, LANCE CODY (23) of APOPKA – Multiple charges including ShopliftingCALDERON OBANDO, FRANCISCO (45) of UNKNOWN – Multiple charges including ShopliftingTOMIUK, BERNARD ROGER (51) of APOPKA – WarrantNEIDHART, ZANE JOSEPH (24) of APOPKA – BurglaryGURULE, JASMIN NAKITA (29) of APOPKA – ShopliftingOROZCOLOPEZ, EDER LEVI (22) of APOPKA – Multiple charges including DUIJAMES, AIMEE C (31) of APOPKA – TrespassingPELLETIER, JAMIE L. (25) of ORLANDO – Multiple charges including BurglaryTHOMAS, GILBERT ARCHIBALD (26) of ORLANDO – Multiple charges including DUITHORNTON, JENNIFER LEE (35) of APOPKA – Aggravated AssaultCARRILLO, HELEN I (24) of MIRAMAR – BatteryMONTESDEOCA, ENMANUEL ABRAHAM (28) of ORLANDO – DUIMORALES, VIVIANA JACQUELINE (30) of ORLANDO – Multiple charges including DUIROSS, DERRELL HASAN (26) of EATONVILLE – Multiple charges including Battery DomesticBARCO, ANTONIO (23) of UNKNOWN – Child AbuseESQUIVELGONZALEZ, NERI HUMBERTO (26) of APOPKA – Multiple charges including DUIGUADARRAMA, CARLOS (27) of APOPKA – Child AbuseJACKSON, TOMMY LEE (20) of APOPKA – BatteryAGUILAR, FLORINDA M (28) of APOPKA – BatteryGARY, COREY JOE (21) of APOPKA – DUILYON, ANDREW MICHAEL (22) of APOPKA – Multiple charges including Drug PossessionCARTER, TIPHANIE GAIL (45) of ORLANDO – Multiple charges including Drug PossessionSHAFFER, JOHNATHAN MICHAEL (29) of APOPKA – Multiple charges including Drug PossessionSTARLING, LYNN MARIE (38) of ORLANDO – Multiple charges including Drug PossessionPETERSON, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM (30) of DELAND – DUIArrest report details provided by the Apopka Police Department Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSAPDApopka Police DepartmentArrest Report Previous articleApopka Burglary Report and MapNext articleWhen resolutions go bad: The difference between a sprain and a strain Claire Haslett RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Please enter your comment! Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 last_img read more

Read More →

The edible backyard: A source for family meals – and fun

first_img Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSVegetable Garden Previous articleApopka Amphitheatre lands Country LegendNext articleHow volunteers are making a difference for animal welfare Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here The Anatomy of Fear Please enter your name here Have your kids ever asked you where the food they’re eating comes from? It’s a question many parents are answering right from their backyard and porches.To create a hands-on educational experience, many families are transforming their usable spaces into fruit and vegetable gardens that feed the whole family, and sometimes neighbors, too. For the price of a few seeds or seedlings, you can produce fruits and vegetables that are delicious, safe, economical, nutritious, and fresh and the best part is, your whole family can dig in together.Truly, a lifetime of gardening for your children can start with a simple seed, and the benefits are not only health-giving but educational as well. According to a study conducted by Tractor Supply Company, the nation’s largest rural lifestyle retailer, 89 percent of Americans feel their children need a better understanding of where their food comes from.If you’re interested in starting your own backyard garden, here are a few tips from the experts at Tractor Supply Company:How do I start?The first thing to do is to decide where your garden will go. Choose an area with the most southern facing sun exposure. Next, get a soil test kit at your local Tractor Supply store. If you’re going to invest time, work and money into your garden, you should make sure your soil is fertile. This simple, inexpensive test will determine that.What should I grow?Simply put, plant the vegetables that your family likes. If your family eats a lot of salad, think about planting lettuces, cucumber, carrots, broccoli, cauliflower, radishes and, of course, tomatoes.It’s also smart to think about the types of meals you cook. Do you stir-fry? Grow bell peppers, onions, peas, and broccoli. Do you enjoy Mexican food? Consider various hot peppers and cilantro. Do you create main dishes from vegetables? Then potatoes, squash, eggplant, and spinach might be the way to go.When planning your garden’s vegetables, consider adding some that your household considers tolerable, but not great. You may find that homegrown freshness increases the taste, and that vegetable just might turn into a family favorite.Plant an unfamiliar vegetable or two, just for kicks. If it’s not to your liking, give the harvest to neighbors or your local food bank.How large should my garden be?A great size for a beginner’s garden is 10×18 feet, which can easily feed a family of four to six. However, your garden should reflect the size of your family, availability of space, amount of time you can spend tending to it and the amount of work you’re willing to do.It’s important to remember that too large a garden can easily overwhelm you and become a discouraging chore instead of an enjoyable pastime. Keep it manageable. You’ll be amazed at the amount of delicious food you can grow in any space-even on a patio or balcony. No space is too small!Supporting the cultureTo help families spend more time together and maximize their garden yield, Tractor Supply Company carries all the supplies a family needs to grow a garden, including mulch, live plants, regular and organic seeds, and garden tools. The rural lifestyle store hosts gardening events featuring expert advice, special products and seed stations for children throughout the planting season. Check with your local Tractor Supply store for details on upcoming gardening events.For more expert advice on lawn and garden care, visit Tractor Supply’s Know How Central, and for homegrown inspiration for your garden, visit Tractor Supply’s Pinterest page. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Please enter your comment! Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more

Read More →