SMC students’ costumes featured on Buzzfeed

first_imgTags: ’90s, costumes, halloween, Weddings Five Saint Mary’s students decided to dress up for Halloween as a ’90s themed bridal party, and in a span of two days, pictures of the students and their costumes were featured by BuzzFeed, Cosmopolitan, Elite Daily and HelloGiggles.The original BuzzFeed article, published Nov. 1, “A Group of College Friends Dressed Up As 90s Bridal Party For Halloween And Had A Fake Wedding,” features the students posing for wedding pictures in their costumes and describing what they did to mimic a wedding.One of the “bridesmaids,” junior Claire Condon said junior Bridget Hogan, the “bride,” originally thought of the idea two weeks before Halloween, and the group of friends unanimously agreed to it.“They all went to the Salvation Army and St. Vincent’s, and they bought the most ridiculous dresses,” Condon said. “I said to pick me something ugly. It was like a real wedding day. We were counting down the days like it was real.”Condon explained that when the girls were getting ready for the “wedding,” she decided to start documenting the experience. She took more than 150 pictures that resembled typical wedding day events and posted them on social media sites.“We all have the same monogram glasses, and we all have the same matching robes with the monograms on them,” she said. “Then we went down to the chapel, and we all went down the aisle, took pictures and came back. Everyone at the party thought our costumes were hilarious. We were like celebrities.”“I put it up as if it were a real album,” Condon said. “I made the album public, only friends of friends could see it, but that’s how all those sites got ahold of all the pictures, too. I went out on a whim, went on Buzzfeed, clicked on the viral page and just clicked the writer’s name [Stephanie McNeal]. I had no idea who she was or anything about her, but I just sent her an email.”Condon explained that after pitching the idea to BuzzFeed, she heard back a day later, and then she and the lead writer exchanged emails.“Next thing I know, I got an email back from her saying thanks, with a link to BuzzFeed attached. We were all cracking up, and we shared it. We were saying, ‘We peaked, look at us,’” Condon said.Condon said people on the Internet were not all supportive of the costume.“Some people were very mean on the comments — they said things like, ‘These girls know nothing about the ’90s,’ ‘They desecrated a church,’ and that our cats must have been busy,” Condon said.Condon said the story, which reached the No. 9 trending story on BuzzFeed and had gotten 100,000 views in one day, was a fun albeit strange experience.“The whole thing was very unreal; it snowballed. It’s bizarre. I keep laughing about it,” she said.last_img read more

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Fat Warning.

first_imgJust when you figured out the new food pyramid and nutritional values on food labels, the Food and Drug Administration is proposing another change.The FDA proposes requiring the amount of trans fatty acids in a food to be included in the Nutrition Facts panel.The proposal would also define “trans fat free” and set a limit on trans fatty acids wherever there are limits on saturated fat in nutrient content or health claims.Why Use Trans Fats?Connie Crawley, an Extension Service food and nutrition specialist with the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, said trans fatty acids are in many foods.”Trans fatty acids are unsaturated fats that have become saturated fats by adding hydrogen to them,” she said. “This hydrogenation makes them more stable and solid. They have more volume and texture and work better for baking. They make foods feel and look better.”They keep food from going stale so fast, too. “Manufacturers can make products farther ahead because they can keep them on the shelf longer,” Crawley said.Trans fat is found in vegetable shortenings, some margarines, crackers, cookies, snacks and other foods.”If you make anything with shortening rather than oil, it’s flakier and lighter,” Crawley said.Hard On Your HeartBut when it comes to food that’s good for you, looks aren’t everything.”Research shows that trans fat has as negative an effect on serum cholesterol as saturated fat,” Crawley said. “It’s similar structurally. There seems to be a connection between trans fat and heart disease.”The American Heart Association says heart disease kills about 500,000 Americans each year. It’s the No. 1 U.S. cause of death.Crawley said labels now address heart disease prevention much more than nutritional deficiencies.”We’re more into health now and the best diet so we can have the highest quality of life for the longest time,” she said.The proposed rule on trans fatty acids would require adding the amount of trans fat per serving to the amount of saturated fat per serving. The amount and percent Daily Value per serving on the Nutrition Facts panel will be based on the sum of the two.An asterisk would be required after the heading “Saturated fat” to refer to a footnote showing the grams of trans fat. The footnote would be optional on foods that contain less than 0.5 grams per serving, except when a fatty acid or cholesterol claim is made.Minimize Exposure”This new label will help people minimize exposure to saturated fat and trans fatty acids,” Crawley said. “It’s almost impossible to avoid these fats. But this will help consumers regulate how much they’re eating.”But the label only works in foods you prepare yourself.”Only an estimated 20 percent of trans fatty acids are in labeled foods,” Crawley said. “Most of what we eat is in restaurants, mostly fried and baked foods, where foods aren’t labeled. The public that eats out a lot won’t know how much they’re eating.”But, she said, “if you eat fried foods in restaurants, be assured you’re probably getting plenty of trans fatty acids.”Most restaurant fried foods are high in trans fatty acids, she said, because cooking oils that contain them taste better and last longer.”Some major food companies offer a trans fatty acid-reduced shortening,” Crawley said. “But there won’t be any motivation for restaurants to change until there is a public outcry.”The bottom line: avoid fried foods.”If you’re going to eat fat, use oil,” Crawley said. “If you eat oil, go with peanut, canola or olive oils. But don’t use much of that either.”last_img read more

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Brown-eyed Susan

first_imgIt’s been 20 years since the Georgia Gold Medal program gave its prestigious award to one of the most persevering native perennials of all time, the Rudbeckia triloba.At the time, finding one at the local garden center was quite rare, even though it is native in 34 states. If you think about it, it is also really quite remarkable that a plant with no dazzling name other than the “three-lobed rudbeckia” or “brown-eyed Susan” staked a place not only in fame, but also in the marketplace.Rudbeckias were made popular ‘Indian Summer,’ a 1995 All-American-Selections-winning Rudbeckia hirta, and ‘Goldsturm,’ a Rudbeckia fulgida var. sullivantii named 1999 Perennial Plant of the Year. Today we are still buying all of them, including the native brown-eyed Susan, the 1997 Georgia Gold Medal winner.I recall taking my family to Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, Georgia, every year, and this rudbeckia’s reflections could be seen across lakes in bold sweeps with Joe Pye weed and the swamp hibiscus. In Callaway’s wildflower garden, there was the same, absolutely dazzling color, along with a swarm of pollinators.At the Coastal Georgia Botanical Garden at the Historic Bamboo Farm, ours are also showing out and are shoulder-high in most locations. They are partnered with salvias, old-fashioned summer phlox and the native spotted monarda, all in a cloud of pollinators that, other than the butterflies, I struggle to identify.Geographically speaking, the Rudbeckia triloba is native to most of the country. It can be grown in many different soils and is cold hardy from zones 4 through 9 or from Texas to Minnesota and most states east. This is why some of us consider this “America’s plant.”The coned-flowers with a dark brown center have petals of yellow-orange and grow in abundance from late summer into fall. Some references suggest that the plant is biennial or a short-lived perennial; others believe it’s a perennial that reseeds too. One thing is for sure — if you plant the Rudbeckia triloba, you will have it around for a long time.If you are plagued by tight, compacted clay that doesn’t drain well, amend it with 4 inches of compost or organic matter and till in 6 to 8 inches. While tilling, take advantage of the opportunity to incorporate 2 pounds of a slow-release, balanced 8-8-8 or 12-6-6 per 100 square feet of planting area.Choose a location that gets plenty of sun for the best blooming. Space your plants 24 to 36 inches apart and plant them at the same depth they are growing in the container. You certainly can plant by seed, and they will bloom the first year. Fall is also a great time to plant, giving you a jump start come spring.If you have dreamed of a wildflower garden, let this be your starter plant. Plant an odd-numbered cluster of three or more with blue salvias, anise hyssops or agastache, Joe Pye weeds, native iron weeds, spotted beebalm and purple coneflowers. You’ll soon be walking a path of rare beauty partnered with the sounds of pollinators moving all around.Follow me on Twitter @CGBGgardenguru. Learn more about the CGBG at www.coastalGeorgiabg.org.last_img read more

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Ressel retires from FBBE

first_imgRessel retires from FBBE January 1, 2003 Daniel Staesser Assistant Editor Regular News Ressel retires from FBBE Assistant Editor In 1971, 22-year-old Kathryn Ressel walked in awe through the main doors of the Supreme Court of Florida to interview for a job with the Florida Board of Bar Examiners.With the post-WWII baby boom came a considerable increase in the number of law students in Florida. The board’s first executive director, Jim Tippin, and his assistant director John Moore, decided they needed more help. A job that required high standards, good communication skills, and realistic salary expectations, they agreed, described English teachers. They sent letters to all English teachers in Leon County.Kathryn Ressel responded to one such letter. An unemployed English teacher at the time, Ressel recalls her humble beginnings, which would eventually lead to her position as executive director, a job she is now giving up to move away and get married.“At the end of the job interview I walked into the casing of the door on my way out. . . It was one of those beginnings where you go ‘ok, I just walked into the wall; I wonder if they noticed that part.’”Notice her they did, and Tippin and Moore, who succeeded Tippin as executive director, became mentors for the young Ressel.“They never doubted me, even when I wasn’t sure about myself,” she admits. Thirty-one years later Ressel sits where Jim Tippin and John Moore had before her, having taken over Moore’s seat in January 1995.With the same excitement as on that first day in the foyer of the Supreme Court, Ressel, who will retire in April, takes pride in the standards the Board of Bar Examiners sets.“The Supreme Court appoints wonderful people to serve on the Board of Bar Examiners who volunteer hundreds of hours every year because they believe in standards for the profession. We have two missions: One is to protect the public, and the other is to safeguard the judicial system.”A once-feared organization, Ressel hopes that her time as executive director has changed lawyers’ perceptions of the board.“I worked so hard in the years that I’ve been executive director to see if I could change some of that reputation. . . They (lawyers) want to be proud of the standards in the profession; we’re here to make sure that stays true.”Ressel reiterates that the board should not be considered just a “gaping unpleasant passage” one has to go through to become a lawyer.“That’s what I hope is part of the legacy I’ll leave is that we’ve worked real hard at being patient. . . as professional and respectful as we could.”“I think she was always willing to listen, to improve the system,” says Tom Pobjecky, longtime colleague and general counsel for the Board of Bar Examiners.From four law schools in the state of Florida when she started in 1971, to the current 10, Ressel says keeping the lines of information open with law schools has been an important part of the board’s job. One of the challenges that Ressel foresees with the board is communicating electronically with Bar applicants and outside sources in a way that will be secure. Communications, she insists, and listening, are keys to fulfilling the board’s goals.A shining example of Bar President Tod Aronovitz’s Dignity-In-Law program, Ressel understands the importance of professionalism, especially with an organization that sometimes has to deliver unpleasant news.“I’ve worked very, very hard, because I believe in the work that we’re doing. I’m not a lawyer, but I believe the public should be protected, and I believe in standards. So, I’m just really taking to heart that this is a job worth doing well.”Ressel’s heart may be in her work, but in February she will give it away. For nearly 10 years, Ressel’s good friend, and wife of a board member, insisted Ressel meet their neighbor. Finally, Ressel took the initiative: “Knock on the door, ask him if he is seeing anyone, and give him my phone number.” Two years later the wedding date is set.“Enjoying life is so much what it’s about. . . just really finding the good things in life,” says Ressel. Rediscovering herself, Ressel intends to catch up on some hobbies. Eager to take flying lessons and fulfill a pre-40 goal of learning how to downhill ski will likely occupy much of the couple’s time.“My husband-to-be has two adorable grandchildren,” she says, “and they have welcomed me into the family. The four-year-old thinks I am the best basketball player in the world (next to Michael Jordan), so I am going to have to practice basketball if I am going to keep that reputation for very long, because,” she whispers “I am not very good.”Becoming the best basketball player in the world might be a longshot, but Ressel, as she has as the Board of Bar Examiners’ executive director, looks forward to other upcoming challenges: “I’m making absolutely no plans for ‘next’ other than moving to Gainesville, and learning how to be this thing I haven’t been in a long, long time. . . learning how to be a good housewife, or as some of my friends say, a ‘domestic goddess.’”Ressel, who looks forward to playing with little boys again, finds inspiration in her husband-to-be, Brent Seagle, who is a doctor at the medical school in Gainesville, specializing in plastic surgery on the faces of babies. She describes his work as “reconstructing whatever needs to be reconstructed.”Such is the case with Ressel’s life. After 30 years with the same organization, Ressel embraces unfamiliar territory with the same passion and drive that has helped transform the Florida Board of Bar Examiners. With an air of excitement she says, “I’ll call you from the other side and tell you what I’m gonna miss.”last_img read more

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Top 10 cybersecurity areas to prepare for your next exam

first_imgAs we prepare for our first annual Ongoing Operations User Meeting and the broader CU InfoSecurity Conference this June 15th – 17th in New Orleans, I am looking forward to hosting a panel on top NCUA examiner concerns. While we all know that cyber-security remains a key area of focus, this session will allow participants to collaborate and share best practices for addressing cyber concerns. For now, below is a breakdown of the top 10 cyber-security areas from our blog. We hope you find these tips useful and invite you to join us in New Orleans as we discuss top compliance and examiner concerns from across the nation.Top 10 Cyber-Security Areas [NCUA Checklist]It’s no surprise that Cyber-Security remains one of the top concerns and top exam priorities for NCUA in 2016. In addition to the self-assessment tool from the FFIEC, the NCUA Region IV identified “The Top Ten Cyber-Security Areas That Examiners Look At”.Here’s a quick look at these 10 steps in more detail:Information security policies. Does the credit union have a board-approved information security policy commensurate with the credit union’s size and complexity and that meets the requirements of NCUA Rules and Regulations Part 748?This is SPOT ON – we saw at least 3 credit unions experience the pain of in-depth NCUA scrutiny of their ISP. Many have been left on the shelf (electronic shelf included) and have not been updated to include newer technologies like Mobile Device Management (MDM) or more alarming – there was no evidence that a member information inventory had been performed. You can’t protect it if you don’t know where it is. We hope you’ll review these 10 areas and be prepared for your next exam! But more importantly – you’ll be protecting your credit union data better! Information security training. Does the credit union have a continuing information security awareness program?Credit union shave some many possible resources here whether it’s internal training or purchased from someone like Stickley. Incident response and crisis management. Is there an updated incident response plan that complies with NCUA Rules and Regulations Part 748, Appendix B?We recently added a tabletop scenario to help our credit unions develop their cyber incident response plan. The results have been nothing short of mind blowing as we defer the normal earthquake or hurricane and go straight for the data! 86SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Kirk Drake Kirk Drake is founder and CEO of Ongoing Operations, LLC, a rapidly growing CUSO that provides complete business continuity and technology solutions. With its recent acquisition of Cloudworks, Ongoing Operations … Web: www.ongoingoperations.com Details Virus and malware. Is the network and all critical components such as servers, desktops, laptops and other systems running updated virus and malware protection software?Seems like a no brainer right? Sadly many credit unions are still lacking on protecting the mobile assets of the organization OR do not have a strong BYOB policy in place.Having a anti-virus solution that is not integrated as a unified strategy also complicates the success because tech teams are busy going from box to box or appliance to appliance just to track down threats. Vendor management. Is there a vendor management policy and program that meets the requirements of NCUA Rules and Regulations Part 748?Too often I see this is outsourced and while technically the work is getting done – the real knowledge of the process is lost on the credit union.  Are their vendors protecting credit union assets in the same manner the CU would? Some of the best VM work I’ve seend was by a credit union tracking their vendors with a simple spreadsheet shared across the organization.center_img Patch management. Do credit union IT personnel manage the installation of all software security patches and updates and ensure that all systems nearing or at the end of their service life are replaced?Its not from lack of trying that patch management isn’t a fine tuned science by now. Credit union CIOs are challenged with rollouts due to 3rd party vendor integration and lack of non-production testing resources. Passwords. Does the credit union enforce a strong password policy based on its risk assessments that meets or exceeds industry standards? At a minimum, passwords should be at least eight characters with alphanumeric and special characters required for added strength and complexity.QWERTY, RR12345, Pa$$word … all easily guessable and still being used today. We know you have a lot of systems to access but you can’t skimp on password syntax. Business continuity planning and disaster recovery test. Is the plan sufficient, up-to-date and recently tested?I’ll refrain from writing a whole book on this one. As a professional planner, we see this all the time. Credit unions are still struggling to wrap their arms around the importance of establishing a culture of business continuity. This needs to change. IT audit. Has management developed an audit plan that addresses all IT-related areas appropriate to the size and complexity of the credit union? This audit plan should also include continuing assessments of internal and external vulnerabilities.I see too many credit unions that “audit” their IT related areas with IT personnel. Get your IA involved and create the same level of control over your member data as you do your cash. Risk assessments. Has management recently performed and documented an information security risk assessment to identify and assess potential threats, their probability, potential effects, and the existing controls and risk remediation plans that the credit union has in place?Key word here – IT (Information Technology) Risk assessment – not your earthquakes or tsunamis. It is expected that a detailed analysis has been completed and mitigation strategies are in place.last_img read more

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Not a Wall Street merger – A uniquely credit union merger

first_imgSuddenly, the crowd erupted. Tears started flowing.Members and staff alike shouted aloud in celebration of victory.  These weren’t tears of sadness, but tears of joy.  Board members, staff and members embraced each other with warm hugs.  In a packed branch office, the chairman of this mid-sized credit union had just announced that the membership had voted in favor – by a large margin – of a merger into a much larger credit union.    As expected the special meeting had been contentious.  There was a faction of membership that wanted the credit union to stay the same.  They wanted to preserve their local credit union and were satisfied with a credit union that was not able to offer a full range of products and technologies. Predictability and heritage were more important than remaining competitive in the market and providing financial opportunities to new members.  There was another group of members that felt the membership and the community would benefit from better pricing, technology, branch convenience and small business services.  Both sides passionately stated their preferences.I stood there reflecting on how unlike Wall Street this merger was.  The StaffThe credit union partners in this merger wanted the merger process to be well executed from beginning to end.  Transparency was, as it should be, a core value.  The credit unions wanted to ensure they reached as many in the community as they could, allowing members to ask questions in a variety of forums.The merger due diligence started with interviews of the merging credit union’s staff to understand member needs.  Focus groups and surveys were conducted of the membership to gain a deeper understanding of the needs and desires. But the credit union leadership didn’t stop there.  Together, the credit unions held town hall meetings, branch information sessions and even participated with a booth at the local farmers’ market.  Staff wore buttons and shirts encouraging members to ask questions.  The board had a better understanding of the merger value proposition once they were armed with an understanding of the needs of the membership, potential members and local small businesses.MembersThe results of the member due diligence for this credit union was similar to the results of other credit union findings.  Credit union membership is made of many different segments with differing needs and different stages of financial decision making.  Consistent with findings from other studies research of the membership and broader market, leadership typically learns that they are often relatively satisfied at that point in time.  Their banking needs are not top of mind because they have not recently been in a financial decision-making mode and thus have not done comparative research with other institutions.For this credit union, the participants in town halls and special meetings had a similar age demographic as many other mergers I have attended through the years.  The members were represented primarily the older segments of them market.  A representative persona of members may have had a savings account, a couple CDs, and perhaps a basic checking account.  The products all work well. And they feel good because the tellers great them by name, and treat them like family, on their many visits to the office.  At that point in time a merger might provide them with better rates, but their banking needs are relatively simple.  You’ll hear these members often arguing for no change at town halls and special meetings.  And, their main concern is whether the staff they know so well will continue to have jobs and benefits.  They have heard the Wall Street horror stories of bank mergers where staff are cut and branches eliminated.  Many of these become the naysayers of a merger.There was a similar small contingent of members that had taken the time to understand this merger wasn’t about their individual needs at a point in time, but rather a way to strengthen the credit union for the future to enable it to meet the needs of current and future members as well as the needs of the community at large. The board’s thorough research, community outreach, and preliminary meetings had given these members the ability to weigh the risks and benefits for themselves.The membership concurred voting strongly in favor of the merger.  The board of directors of the merging credit union understood the resource constraints and future requirements to be a successful credit union based on years of experience and an honest assessment of the future.  The board fully supported the merger. Both boards advocated member education combined with extensive outreach to provide members the information they needed to support a decision for the best future of the credit union.  Lessons learned from this merger included:A Wall Street merger is clear cut – maximize the return to the shareholders.  The debate among credit union member owners is different.  They care about the staff, future members and the community.How wonderfully unique our credit union movement is that after a vote we can all get together for a group hug.  You’re not going to find that on Wall Street. 23SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Glenn Christensen Glenn Christensen is Founder and President of CEO Advisory Group the first Merger and Acquisitions consultancy focusing on the credit union industry.As a visionary and entrepreneurial leader with 25 … Web: www.ceoadvisory.com Detailslast_img read more

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Community steps up: Meals on Wheels of Western Broome serving more meals despite impacts of Matilda’s Law

first_imgThe increase comes as individuals over seventy have been urged by New York State to stay home through Matilda’s Law. The law requires individuals over the age of seventy as well as those with underlying health conditions and those with compromised immune systems to remain at home. Pangilinan says the law has also presented other challenges. Pangilinan says staff are required to wear gloves, wash their hands frequently and remain six feet away from other volunteers at all time. While staff have also been advised to cut back on interaction with clients, she says now is not the time to stop providing meals. “We can take on more people right now and we want to deliver as long as we possibly can so until they tell us to stop we can take on more people,” she said. ENDICOTT (WBNG) — Staff at Meals on Wheels of Western Broome say the phone has been ringing a little more often than usual due to the coronavirus. So staff say they asked the community for help and the community responded. center_img “We’ve had a lot of people from the community stepping up to say they’d like to volunteer we’ve signed up a bunch of new people and some of our existing volunteers are also working extra days,” said Volunteer Coordinator Bonnie Hathaway. “Demand for our service has gone up probably about 25% in the last few weeks so with a very small staff of seven people it’s been a little crazy handling the increase in demand,” said Executive Director Jackie Pangilinan. “As you can imagine most of our volunteers are age seventy or older so when Matilda’s law was suggested by Governor Cuomo we lost a large portion of our volunteers,” she said. last_img read more

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UN: Pandemic risk remains despite progress on H5N1

first_imgOct 23, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – So far this year no new countries have been hit by H5N1 avian influenza outbreaks, and fewer previously affected countries have reported fresh outbreaks, but the threat of an influenza pandemic has not changed, according to a recent progress report from the United Nations (UN) and the World Bank.The 115-page update on the global avian influenza status and pandemic planning efforts was released in advance of an international conference on avian and pandemic flu that starts tomorrow in Sharm el-Sheik, Egypt, according to the UN’s summary of the report, the fourth in an annual series.The report is an analysis of survey responses that the UN’s influenza coordinator compiled from 148 countries. The findings also include information that the World Bank provided on the international pledges, commitments, and expenditures for avian influenza prevention and control.Too little testing David Nabarro, the UN’s influenza coordinator, told reporters at an Oct 21 press conference that despite widespread pandemic planning efforts, only 53% of countries have tested their plans in the past year. He said in a UN press release that the findings are sobering, particularly in light of a recent World Bank report that put the potential economic cost of a global influenza pandemic at up to $3 trillion, nearly 5% of the world’s gross domestic product.”When planning for an extraordinary concern like an influenza pandemic, it’s not enough just to have a written plan and have everybody signing off on it,” he said in an Oct 21 press release. “You also have to check it, test it, and make sure that it works, and then revise [it] on the basis of assimilation.”Pandemic plans need to include both social distancing and pharmaceutical strategies, but not all countries are prepared to apply both strategies, the report said. Some haven’t established the logistical and legal provisions needed to enact social distancing measures.The UN said it found great disparities in preparedness among countries, with, for example, wealthier countries more likely to have planned for pharmaceutical interventions. “Given the interdependence of countries when responding to a pandemic, preparedness within poorer countries will be a critical element of the world’s readiness for the next pandemic,” the report said.Also, some individual countries have made progress on plans to maintain essential services during a pandemic, but more nations need to engage the private sector to accomplish multisector planning. The UN recommended that for 2009, countries develop protocols, frameworks, and indicators for longer-term multisector pandemic preparedness and fund the efforts through their all-hazard preparedness mechanisms.In response to reporters’ questions about pandemic planning transparency, Nabarro said he’s noticed more openness among some countries, such as China. However, he said he was concerned that interactions among countries were “sometimes a bit tense.”Outbreaks and surveillanceIn reporting that no new countries had H5N1 outbreaks through September, the UN report said for comparison, four countries reported the virus for the first time in the first 6 months of 2007. Only 20 countries have experienced outbreaks so far this year, down from 25 reported in 2007.Bangladesh is the only new country that has reported a human H5N1 case this year, according to the UN’s findings.Nabarro said he was concerned about Nigeria and Togo, which have both reported recent H5N1 outbreaks.The UN said effective surveillance, prompt detection, and rapid response have helped many countries eliminate outbreaks. The report notes that surveillance for animal diseases, including H5N1, has substantially improved over the past 3 years, with 75% of countries not reporting that they are able to detect highly pathogenic avian flu. For some countries, though, surveillance systems are still in the planning phase, and some planning hasn’t included risk assessments to target priority areas.However, the threat of further outbreaks in poultry and sporadic infections in humans persists, because the H5N1 virus is still entrenched in many countries. “The threat of an influenza pandemic remains unchanged,” the report said.Funding is erodingThe World Bank reported that the gap between what’s needed to control avian influenza and boost preparedness and what world donors are pledging has been increasing since 2005. Though major donor nations have continued their support, the number slipped from 25 at the Beijing donor’s conference in 2006 to 17 at the Bamako conference in 2006, and to 9 at the New Delhi conference in 2007.Donors have pledged $2.7 billion, of which $2 billion has been committed. Of that amount, $1.5 billion has been disbursed, of which 59% was cash or loans and 41% was in-kind contributions. Declines in funding threaten the sustainability of control and planning investments that have already been made, according to the report.”Such high commitment and disbursement rates within two and a half years of the establishment of the financing framework reflect the exceptional commitment of the donors and the efficient movement of grant funds,” the report said.East and Southeast Asian countries received 56% of the funds, Eastern Europe and Central Asia received 22%, and Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, and North Africa got 20%, according to the report. Only $125 million remains in available funding, the World Bank said. “Grant finance will continue to be needed to sustain critical capacities and actions in the medium to longer term.”See also:UN-World Bank report on avian influenza and pandemic readinessUN-World Bank report summaryOct 21 UN press releaselast_img read more

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Development goes west

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Gladys Hurt

first_imgGladys Hacker Hurt has gone to be with our Lord at the age of 86.She was born on February 26, 1932, in Mill Pond, Kentucky, the 3rd of 9 children born to Harvey and Oda Mae (Frazier) Hacker. She lived in Kentucky (during the Great Depression) and migrated to Hamilton, Ohio with her family. As a young teenager she worked various jobs, she was a seamstress, waitress and “presser” at Clever Dry Cleaners. Later in life she worked as a Qualified Medical Assistant at Dillsboro Manor and “secretly” passed her GED to complete her high school education. On March 31, 1953, she married Edwin Wilson Hurt in Liberty, Indiana. In 1966 the Hurt family moved to Dillsboro, Indiana.Gladys courageously lived through WW II and her husband’s deployment to Korea and Japan in 1953. She loved the time spent working by her husband’s side at Ed Hurt Realty. She loved cheering on her favorite MLB team, The Cincinnati Reds, and was the primary caregiver for her daughter, Lydia, after Lydia underwent brain surgery. Lydia received unconditional love and tireless 24/7 care at home until her death in 1978. Gladys was most appreciative of the support the family received for Lydia from the Dillsboro Community, friends, and Dr. GT Bowen.Gladys is survived by 5 of her 7 children; two sons, Edwin Lee Hurt (Shelly) of Ohio, Mark Stephen Hurt, Indiana, and three daughters, Shirley Olinger of Arizona, Lisa Kaye Keehan Hurt, Ohio, and Jennifer Lynne Hurt, Indiana, her sisters Mary Hacker Cobb, Ohio, Lucy Hacker McQueen, Kentucky ,and her brother Dan Hacker, Kentucky. She was blessed with grandchildren; Glenn, Chuck, Lindsey, Jenny Jo, John Edwin, Michael, Jason, Jessica, Cydney, Morgan, Elizabeth, Lydia, Brittany, and many great-grandchildren.Her daughter, Lydia Odel Hurt, and son, John Harvey Hurt, preceded her in death, as did her husband of 58 years, Ed; her parents, Harvey and Oda Frazier Hacker, her sisters, Imogene Hacker, Beatrice Sexton, Edith Parrett, Julia Faye Neal, and her brother, Donald Gene Hacker.Funeral services will be 12 p.m. Wednesday March 7, 2018 at Filter-DeVries-Moore Funeral Home with Pastor Corey Potts officiating. Burial will be at Oakdale Cemetery. Visitation will be Wednesday from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. also at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to Veterans Memorial Trinity Christian Center. You may go to filterdevriesmoore to leave an online condolence message for the family. Filter-DeVries-Moore Funeal home entrusted with arrangements, 12887 Lenover Street P.O. Box 146 Dillsboro, In 47018. (812)432-5480.last_img read more

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