Fracking returning to NB after firing of top doctor says provincial NDP

first_img(Elsipogtog First Nation resident Amanda Polchies kneels with an eagle feather in front of a line of RCMP officers on Oct. 17, 2013. The iconic image received international recognition. APTN/Ossie Michelin)APTN National NewsNew Brunswick’s top doctor was fired by the provincial Liberal government to clear the way for the lifting of a moratorium on shale gas exploration this spring, according to the leader of the provincial NDP.Provincial NDP leader Dominic Cardy says a senior government source told him Eilish Cleary, New Brunswick’s now-fired chief medical officer, would stand in the way of a government decision to lift the moratorium.A lifting of the moratorium would likely trigger a replay of the intense, Mi’kmaq-led protests that rocked the eastern part of the province throughout 2013. The demonstrations were centered around the Mi’kmaq community of Elsipogtog which was adamantly opposed to shale gas exploration in its claimed territory over fears it would lead to hydraulic fracturing, also known as fracking, and eventually poison the water.As news spread of Cleary’s firing, a Facebook posting appeared calling on people to “warrior up.”During the 2014 provincial election, the victorious Liberal party campaigned on a promise to impose a moratorium on shale gas exploration. Once in government, the Liberals created a commission to study the issue and give the government recommendations, expected in early 2016.Cardy said Monday that the firing of Cleary was connected to the eventual lifting of the shale gas moratorium.“I was told by a person in the bureaucracy today that Dr. Cleary would stand in the way of the report recommending that the moratorium be lifted,” said Cardy, in a Facebook message to APTN National News.APTN contacted Premier Brian Gallant’s office seeking comment, but has yet not received a response. While in Ottawa for a premiers meeting with the prime minister in November, Gallant said consultation with First Nations was necessary on resource development projects.Cleary had been the province’s chief medical officer since 2008 and in 2012 issued a report raised concerns about the health impacts of fracking.She was also in the midst of conducting research into the use of glyphosate—a herbicide widely used on Crown land in the province—when she was put on leave several weeks ago.Cleary announced Monday that she had been fired.Cardy said there needs to be an independent investigation into why she was let go.The NDP leader, who doesn’t have a seat in New Brunswick’s legislature, took to Facebook earlier Monday to criticize the Liberal government over the firing and linked it to the shale gas exploration moratorium.“A senior source has told me Dr. Cleary had to be cleared away before the Liberals overturn their shale gas moratorium next spring,” wrote Cardy. “The Liberals used Dr. Cleary’s work to justify their first flip-flop on fracking. Now, with none of her recommendations having been acted upon, the Liberals need to make sure the Chief Medical Officer of Health is not around to point out their hypocrisy.”The previous Tory provincial government was stuck with an about $10 million bill from the RCMP as a result of anti-fracking demonstrations. The demonstrations hit their apex on Oct. 17, 2013, when a heavily armed RCMP tactical unit raided an anti-fracking camp that had trapped shale gas exploration trucks.The raid, which resulted in about 40 arrests, did not stop the demonstrations and they continued throughout November of that year and featured confrontations with the RCMP and burning tires on a provincial highway.New Brunswick is also the end-point for the Energy East pipeline which faces grassroots opposition in the province and across the country.TransCanada’s Energy East pipeline proposal would carry Alberta mined bitumen across the country to the Irving Oil refining compound in Saint John, NB.news@aptn.ca@APTNNewslast_img read more

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Its hard to operate a school like that Principal at Thunder Bay

first_imgWillow Fiddler APTN National NewsDennis Franklin Cromarty high school in Thunder Bay, Ont., was the centre of an extensive inquest held by the province.It was looking into the circumstances around the deaths of seven First Nations students, six of them attended the school.The principal of DFC was there for it all and now he’s taking a new path.wfiddler@aptn.calast_img

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Political panel heats up over bill aiming to change how energy projects

first_imgNation to NationThere used to be a time when Conservative governments cared about the environment says Liberal MP Marc Miller.“They don’t anymore,” said Miller on Nation to Nation Thursday.“They just care about a shrinking base.”Which is why the Conservatives are feeding into the base – heading into a fall election – when they say Bill C-69 will kill pipelines he added.“So absolutely false,” responded Conservative MP Cathy McLeod, “that we do not care about the environment but what we don’t want put in place is a process that does nothing for environment but increases red tape across the country.”It was rare show of combativeness for Miller, a regular on Nation to Nation, who usually sticks to party lines on any topic.The exchange followed a line of questioning on the new Indigenous languages bill that both agreed was a good idea.But when it came to resource development the Liberal and Conservative butted heads even though they both want Trans Mountain pipeline expanded.Where they differ is how similar projects are approved which is what Bill C-69 is about, including overhauling the federal review process.It’s currently before the Senate and expected to be kicked back over the House of Commons with amendments before becoming law.McLeod, like many in the resource sector, don’t want it to get that far.“I think this bill needs to be killed. This is a no more pipelines bill. It will drive away investment,” she said. “I think it’s a bill looking for a solution where there was no problem.”That’s not exactly true said Miller.“If you are for killing C-69 you’re for that process that led to the TMX mess that Conservatives created,” he said.He’s speaking of the Trans Mountain pipeline approval that a Federal Court later overturned for not properly consulting Indigenous people.The lack of consultation mostly happened under the previous Stephen Harper government through the National Energy Board that recommended Canada proceed with the expansion from Edmonton, Alta. to Burnaby, B.C.But final approval was given by Prime Minister Justin Trudeau who believed his government’s own review of the National Energy Board approval, along with speaking, briefly, to First Nations affected by the pipeline route was enough consultation.Now the Trudeau government says they are trying to get it right and listening to courts.“This bill plugs a lot of holes that were created by the previous government and allows Indigenous consultation, reliance on science and not some partisan approval that just jams things through,” said Miller.That includes the Harper government eliminating thousands of preliminary screenings of projects the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency did each year down to less than 100 said Green party leader Elizabeth May.But Trudeau isn’t looking to increase the number.“Under the current legislation most federal projects will never see a review,” said May.That means if a First Nation has a problem with a project there likely won’t be an initial environmental assessment where that issue can be raised.Then things get weird with the bill, said May, because she and Conservatives agree on something.“The pro-pipeline people of this bill have decided this bill is a bill to stop pipelines because there is a lot of ministerial discretion. In other words, the minister of Environment can step up at various points in the process and say this project is approved or this project is turned down before the process of review is even complete,” said May.She agreed that the minister should not have that level of discretion.“You should make sure you reviewed a project fully and then a minister can make the ultimate decision. There’s no need for that kind of discretion,” said May. “So on that, and on that only, I would agree with Conservative senators.”Yet, she believes the bill can be fixed.It just needs good amendments.N2N@aptn.calast_img read more

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Unique tutorlearner relationship sets example when it comes to literacy language revitalization

first_imgChris MacIntyreAPTN NewsKwanlin’ Dun First Nation Elder Louie Smith has spent most of his 86 years living and learning on the land.When Smith was a child an outbreak of tuberculosis at the school in Carcross, YT, forced Smith’s father to remove him from class.Louie only spent two weeks at the school and never learned how to read.“A lot of kids died there,” says Smith. “You play around today and tomorrow you already die in the Carcross school.“So that’s why I never went to school”(Ted Ackerman and Louie Smith spend two days a week at the House of Learning reading, sharing stories and history with each other. Photo: Chris MacIntyre/APTN)Louie always wanted to learn how to read.He says that once you learn to read, you can learn to sing.When Smith reached his 80s , a family member suggested he register with Yukon Learn – a not for profit agency whose mandate is to help Yukon adults improve their literacy.After a few different tutors, Louie finally met Ted Ackerman in 2015.Ackerman had been volunteering with Yukon Learn since 2013 and was excited at the opportunity to work together with a First Nation Elder.For the past four years, two times a week, Louie Smith and his tutor Ted Ackerman spend their mornings surrounded by books at the House of Learning building in Whitehorse.Their reading lesson always starts off with a cup of fresh coffee and usually a story from Smith’s childhood.Smith isn’t the only one learning at these weekly tutoring sessions.Ackerman is also on the receiving end.(From the left: Kwanlin’ Dun elder Louie Smith, Ted Ackerman, Kwanlin Dun Chief Doris Bill and Yukon Premier Sandy Silver at the Council of the Federation Literacy award presentation. Photo: Chris MacIntyre/APTN)Smith shares his stories and history of First Nation’s culture and has been teaching Ackerman words in Southern Tutchone.Ackerman says being able to teach and at the same time learn is a rich experience.“Literacy is not just the reading and writing, that’s a large part but it’s also the understanding of knowledge of the world around you,” he says.“Louie is highly literate in Yukon First Nation culture and he shares that with me.”Recently Smith and Ackerman were presented with the 2019 Council of the Federation Literacy Award.The award recognizes contributions to literacy and First Nation language revitalization.(Literacy Award : The Council of the Federation Literacy medals. Photo: Chris MacIntyre/APTN)With permission from the Kwanlin’ Dun First Nation, the pair have preserved over 100 items of First Nations history through recordings and books.There are no plans to stop the tutoring sessions and Smith has even said that he’d like more.Through the time spent together, Smith continues to learn how to read and Ackerman gets a greater understanding of First Nation culture.“I’ve read the Truth and Reconciliation report and I’ve read the Together Today for our Children Tomorrow and both of those documents talk about sort of what the institutions and the organizations of our cultures and country need to do to help our cultures co-exist,” says Ackerman.“I think if there’s a lot more of me and Louie doing things we wouldn’t need those big documents as much”.cmacintyre@aptn.calast_img read more

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TorontoMontreal in 39 minutes Hyperloop judges say this route is a winner

first_imgThe Toronto-Montreal corridor has taken the prize as one of the strongest candidates in the world for a hyperloop system that could cut travel time between the cities from five hours to just 39 minutes.But transportation expert Martin Collier says there’s no way he’s going to be the first to buy a ticket to ride in a bullet-shaped craft that would travel through a tube at speeds of around 1,000 kilometres per hour, four times faster than high-speed rail.“I think I’ll be watching — if I’m still alive when it hits the ground and is ready to go,” said the founder of Transport Futures, which promotes education about transportation issues, on Friday.“I’ll probably wait and see whether other people like it first. I’m not an early adopter.”The Toronto-Montreal route was the only Canadian winner among 10 entries chosen from hundreds in an international competition sponsored by Los Angeles-based Hyperloop One, which has a working hyperloop test system in the Nevada desert.“The results of the Hyperloop One Global Challenge far exceeded our expectations,” said Rob Lloyd, CEO of Hyperloop One, in a statement posted on its website on Thursday.“These 10 teams each had their unique strengths in showcasing how they will alleviate serious transportation issues in their regions… Studies like this bring us closer to our goal of implementing three full-scale systems operating by 2021.”Hyperloop is a technology promoted by Tesla founder Elon Musk which would place passengers and cargo in a cylindrical vehicle which accelerates via electric propulsion through a low-air-pressure tube, suspended above the track using magnetic levitation. The vehicles are expected to glide at airline speeds for long distances due to ultra-low aerodynamic drag.Hyperloop One’s nine other winning entries included four in the United States, two in each of the United Kingdom and India, and one in Mexico. All are now be studied to determine commercial viability.Sebastien Gendron, CEO of Toronto startup TransPod, says his company aims to have an operating hyperloop system in Canada as early as 2025 and he’s confident the public will embrace the technology.“We already travel at that speed with an aircraft and the main difference with our system is we are on the ground,” he said. “And it’s safer to be on the ground than in the air.”He added TransPod is talking with the federal transportation department to ensure safety regulations are in place for when the technology is ready to be implemented.Gendron said he agrees with Hyperloop One that the Toronto-Montreal corridor is suitable for a system because traffic is heavy and there is no existing high-speed ground travel alternative for travellers.But he said TransPod is also interested in the Calgary-Edmonton corridor in Alberta — he is bidding for provincial and city support for a four- to 10-kilometre-long test track on public land near Calgary to test his company’s technology.If granted and sufficient funds are raised, he says the track could be operational by 2020, the technology could be finalized by 2022 and the first commercial system could be in place between 2025 and 2030.Gendron said a hyperloop ticket from Edmonton to Calgary would cost $60 to $80, one way. He estimates it would cost $25 million to $29 million to build a kilometre of TransPod track, about half of the cost of a high-speed rail line.The winning Hyperloop One contest route as proposed by the Canadian arm of U.S. engineering firm AECOM would include a stop in Ottawa. The proposal suggests a trip from Toronto to Ottawa would take 27 minutes and the Ottawa-Montreal leg would take another 12 minutes.It says the next logical step would be to extend the hyperloop system into the U.S., west to Detroit from Windsor, Ont., and east from Quebec to Niagara Falls and Buffalo and on toward Chicago, New York and Boston.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter.last_img read more

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Scheer Canada speaks with one voice on renegotiating NAFTA deal

first_imgWASHINGTON – In his first foreign trip as leader of the official Opposition, Andrew Scheer avoided any criticism of the Liberal federal government, telling a Washington audience that Canada speaks with one voice on NAFTA.The Conservative leader was at the Wilson Center on Wednesday explaining that he and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau have their partisan differences, but not when it comes to preserving the Canada-U.S. relationship.”On NAFTA, the Canadian Parliament … is united,” Scheer told the think tank.”We have our partisan differences. When we hold the government to account, as is our role in our parliamentary system, we will absolutely point out what we think they should be doing differently,” he added. “But when it comes to our relationship with the United States we do speak with one voice.“We want to make sure we’re here to support our government’s efforts in maintaining and protecting what we have in NAFTA. I believe it’s important to send that signal to interests here in Washington.”He later avoided being pulled into the more controversial aspects of negotiations to renew the continental trade pact. One of the attendees of the event — David Wilkins, a former U.S. ambassador to Canada — asked him to suggest what concessions Canada and the U.S. should be prepared to make to get a deal.Scheer replied: ”I don’t think it would be helpful.”Scheer is in Washington with several Conservative MPs for meetings with the U.S. transportation secretary, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, former George W. Bush-era officials Robert Zoellick and Josh Bolton, and with some lawmakers on Capitol Hill.It’s his first working visit outside Canada in his new role.The head of the Wilson Center, former nine-term Democratic congresswoman Jane Harman, contrasted Scheer’s approach to NAFTA with the partisanship in Washington. She opined that the U.S. political model is broken, with politicians being rewarded by their primary voters for bashing the other party, and punished if they try working across the aisle to solve problems”Your politics are more adult,” she told Scheer.To which the Conservative leader replied: ”You haven’t seen (our) question period.”Scheer said he’s heard lots of anxiety from businesses in Canada, asking what he’s hearing about NAFTA in Ottawa. He said he’s now trying to learn more about the state of the negotiations from people in Washington.The next round of negotiations is scheduled for next week in Montreal. While U.S. President Donald Trump has repeatedly threatened to start pulling out of the agreement as a negotiating ploy, lately he has made more positive comments about the negotiations.Asked later if his visit had reassured him, Scheer said he had mixed feelings: he’s more confident that many people are fighting to keep NAFTA from being cancelled but cancellation remains a possibility.”(So) yes and no,” Scheer said.”I’m encouraged that there is a high level of engagement from people here in Washington — both on the elected side and from people that represent industries. One of our concerns was, ‘Will people here in the U.S. who support NAFTA become engaged and help make the case?’ I’ve been very encouraged by that,” he said.“But at the same time it’s also clear that they’re doing so because they think the risk is real.”last_img read more

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Postmedia Q2 loss falls as costcutting tax credit offset lower revenue

first_imgTORONTO – A $17-million interactive digital media tax credit from the Ontario government helped pare Postmedia Network Canada Corp.’s second-quarter net loss to $1.3 million from a loss of $28.5 million a year earlier.However, Postmedia executive chairman Paul Godfrey said that was the last quarter for the tax recovery because newspapers were specifically excluded in the 2015 Ontario budget.Instead, he hopes continued lobbying of all levels of government will lead to financial support and “ultimately the preservation of distinctly Canadian brands and voices.”Godfrey singled out Quebec, which announced in its recent budget that it will spend about $36 million to help newspapers in the province, including about $19 million to aid their transition to digital platforms.“We are hopeful that this may inspire support from other provincial governments and even perhaps our federal government to help made-in-Canada industries level the playing field,” he said during a conference call.Federal Heritage Minister Melanie Joly unveiled a cultural strategy in September that lacked measures to boost newspapers. She said Ottawa had no interest in bailing out industry models that are no longer viable.Ottawa was called upon to tax foreign companies selling digital subscriptions in Canada, create a $400-million fund to help finance reliable news and information and provide a five-year tax credit to partially offset digital investments by print outlets.Feburary’s federal budget included $50 million over five years to support “local journalism in underserved communities,” and plans to explore new models that would allow private and philanthropic support for “non-profit” journalism, including allowing Canadian newspapers to receive charitable status.Postmedia’s net loss for the three months ended Feb. 28 was down despite a continued decline in revenue at its newspaper operations as the company continued its focus on cutting costs, partially through the closure of several community newspapers between November and January.The Toronto-based company, which owns the National Post and numerous other paper and digital publications, said its operating expenses were down 21 per cent or $36.2 million.The company said it was granted the $17 million media tax credit in February after refiling its tax returns relating to previously recognized compensation expenses between September 2012 and April 2015.Excluding the tax recovery claim, expenses excluding depreciation, amortization, amortization, impairment and restructuring decreased 11.1 per cent or $19.2 million.Those positives offset a 10.8 per cent decline in revenue to $157.6 million, which was down $19.1 million from last year’s fiscal second quarter.Print advertising revenue was down $16.3 million, or 18.8 per cent, while print circulation revenue was down $4.6 million or 7.9 per cent.Godfrey said that the revenue declines from its legacy business had slowed and the company “is making some progress” from its digital advertising initiatives.“I didn’t take this job to attend a funeral at some point in time,” he said, noting other newspapers are facing similar challenges.Digital revenue — which includes national and local display advertising, classified advertising on Postmedia’s newspaper and other websites such as canada.com and canoe.com, and subscriptions — totalled $26.4 million in the quarter, up 10.1 per cent from the same time last year.Shortly after the quarter ended, the Competition Bureau obtained a warrant to search one of Postmedia’s offices as part of an investigation into an asset-swap with Torstar Corp., owner of the Toronto Star and other publications.No charges have been laid and the allegations included in the court documents have not been proven in court. Torstar and Postmedia have said they do not believe they contravened the Competition Act and they are co-operating.Under the agreement announced by the two companies in November, 41 newspapers changed hands and 36 were closed, mainly in Ontario regions served by multiple publications. Nearly 300 jobs were cut as a result.In documents used by the bureau to obtain warrants to search several offices of the two companies, the watchdog alleged they conspired to divide up sales, territories, customers and/or markets for advertising or flyer distribution in certain regions.The bureau also said the companies had lists of which Torstar and which Postmedia employees would be terminated and agreed to a transitional services agreement.Postmedia said Wednesday that it had incurred $3.5 million of severance costs over the six months ended Feb. 28, mostly in its first quarter ended Nov. 30. Over the two quarters, it also recorded about $1.7 million in provisions for onerous leases and contracts and $500,000 in acquisition costs related to the Torstar transaction.— With files from Ross Marowits in MontrealTorstar holds an investment in The Canadian Press as part of a joint agreement with a subsidiary of the Globe and Mail and the parent company of Montreal’s La Presse.Companies in this story: (TSX:PNC.B, TSX:PNC.A, TSX.TS.B)last_img read more

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Suncor reports lower net earnings as weather outage cuts into oilsands output

first_imgCALGARY – Suncor Energy Inc. says net earnings in the first quarter of 2018 fell to $789 million or 48 cents per share, compared to $1.35 billion or 81 cents per share in the same period of 2017.Net earnings included a $329-million non-cash foreign exchange loss and a non-cash gain of $133 million from an exchange of lands with Canbriam Energy Inc.It missed analyst expectations of $1.05 billion or 63 cents as reported by Thomson Reuters.Operating earnings, which strip out one-time and non-cash items, were $985 million or 60 cents per share, beating $812 million or 49 cents posted a year earlier as well as analyst predictions of $952 million or 53 cents per share.Suncor says a “weather-related outage” at the company’s base camp north of Fort McMurray, Alta., resulted in lower production and upgrader utilization in the first quarter, although operations returned to normal by the end of February.Suncor’s total upstream production came in at 689,400 barrels of oil equivalent per day in the three months ended March 31, compared to 725,100 boe/d in the prior year quarter, as oilsands output fell to 404,800 barrels per day from 448,500 bpd.CEO Steve Williams said the loss of production and ongoing effects of deeper discounts paid for western Canadian heavy crude were offset by higher prices for its offshore production, higher realized profit margins in its refining and marketing arms and lower feedstock costs.Companies in this story: (TSX:SU)last_img read more

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Most actively traded companies on the TSX

first_imgSome of the most active companies traded Friday on the Toronto Stock Exchange:Toronto Stock Exchange (16,409.16, up 32.39 points)Cequence Energy Ltd. (TSX:CQE). Oil and gas. Down a penny, or 10 per cent, to nine cents on 20.77 million shares.Bombardier Inc. (TSX:BBD.B). Aerospace, rail equipment. Up 16 cents, or 3.37 per cent, to $4.91 on 11.73 million shares. The company reported adjusted net income of US$87 million or three cents per share, beating analyst expectations of one cent per share according to Thomson Reuters Eikon, as its rail division improved.Aurora Cannabis Inc. (TSX:ACB). Healthcare. Down 10 cents, or 1.46 per cent, to $6.74, on 6.29 million shares.Trinidad Drilling Ltd. (TSX:TDG). Oil and Gas. Down three cents, or 2.13 per cent, to $1.38 on 4.7 million shares.Gildan Activewear. (TSX:GIL). Manufacturing. Up $7.30, or 21.60 per cent, to $41.10 on 4.35 million shares. The company released second-quarter sales and profits that beat analyst expectations and upwardly revised its profit guidance for the year. The company reported adjusted earnings of 52 cents per share, beating analysts estimates of 49 cents per share, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon.Yamana Gold Inc. (TSX:YRI). Miner. Down 15 cents, or 3.62 per cent, to $3.99 on 4.3 million shares.Companies reporting major news:Aimia Inc. (TSX:AIM). Down a penny, or 0.29 per cent, to $3.46 on 1.66 million shares. The company that owns Aeroplan confirmed it was in talks with airline alliance Oneworld on a potential loyalty program partnership. News of the talks with a rival to the Star Alliance airline network that Air Canada belongs to comes as Air Canada’s offer to buy the Aeroplan program is set to expire.last_img read more

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Ivanka Trump Apple CEO Tim Cook to visit Idaho schools

first_imgWILDER, Idaho — Ivanka Trump, President Donald Trump’s daughter and White House adviser, is scheduled to visit a southwestern Idaho school district with Apple CEO Tim Cook.White House officials say the visit on Tuesday is part of Ivanka Trump’s workforce development initiative that includes science, technology, engineering and math — also known as STEM education.She and Cook are scheduled to visit the Wilder School District west of Boise.Apple in 2016 donated iPads to all students and teachers in the district as part of a program to help students lacking access to technology. The school district is one of southwestern Idaho’s poorest.Wilder Superintendent Jeff Dillon in a letter to parents says the district will showcase how it is combining learning and technology.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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OPEC members expected to agree cut in crude production

first_imgVIENNA — OPEC members are meeting to agree on their response to recent declines in oil prices, with analysts predicting a cut in production of at least 1 million barrels per day.Crude prices began falling in October and continued to plunge last month because of oversupply and fears weaker global economic growth would dampen energy demand. The price of both benchmark U.S. crude and the standard for internationally traded oil fell 22 per cent in November.Mohammed Hamad al-Rumhy, Oman’s oil and gas minister, said Wednesday of the production cut expected at Thursday’s meeting that “we haven’t discussed the numbers.”U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted Wednesday that “Hopefully OPEC will be keeping oil flows as is, not restricted. The World does not want to see, or need, higher oil prices!”The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Fort St John receives 1012 cm of snow as of Friday afternoon

first_imgAccording to Sekhon, we are expected to receive an additional 5-10 cm overnight with the snowfall ending Saturday afternoon.An extreme cold warning is currently in effect for the North Peace. FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Environment Canada has released the amount of snow Fort St. John and the B.C. Peace has received so far.Bobby Sekhon, Meteorologist with Environment Canada, says our area has received 10-12 cm of snow as of Friday afternoon.“We’ve had, obviously, some snowfall with the system that is moving through right now. It looks like about 10-12 cm of snow in the B.C. Peace and still some more to come into this afternoon and tonight.”last_img read more

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Grande Prairie RCMP seek publics assistance in locating missing youth

first_imgGRANDE PRAIRIE, A.B. – Grande Prairie RCMP are asking for the public’s assistance in locating 15-year-old Dana Buckley.According to RCMP, Buckley was last seen in the Grande Prairie Area on July 21, 2019.Buckley is described as: Female5’4″Approximately 120 lbsLong brown hairRCMP say there is a concern for her well-being.Anyone with information on Buckley’s whereabouts is being asked to call the Grande Prairie RCMP at 780-830-5700 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.last_img

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Huawei says no legal case against Australia, for now

first_imgSydney: Chinese telecoms giant Huawei said Friday it had no immediate plans to mount a legal challenge over Australia’s decision to bar the company’s equipment from the 5G network Down Under. A day after taking Donald Trump’s administration to court for banning US federal agencies from buying Huawei products, the firm said no such move was envisaged in Australia. “Whilst we have our differences with the federal government, we would still rather work cooperatively,” a company spokesman told AFP. Also Read – Maruti cuts production for 8th straight month in Sep “A legal challenge is not a priority at this moment.” Australia in August announced guidelines on contracts to build fifth generation mobile networks in the country which effectively barred Huawei and another Chinese giant, ZTE, from the project. Canberra cited intelligence agency warnings against the “involvement of vendors who are likely to be subject to extrajudicial directions from a foreign government”. As Huawei has grown, fears have emerged that the company could effectively provide the Chinese state with a switch to cut critical infrastructure during a crisis. Also Read – Ensure strict implementation on ban of import of e-cigarettes: revenue to Customs While Huawei insists it is a private company, its founder Ren Zhengfei is a 74-year-old former People’s Liberation Army engineer. And while there are no formal ties with the state, in practice large Chinese firms and the ruling Communist Party are intricately interlinked. In 2015, Beijing passed a law obliging its corporations to aid the government on matters of national security. That, coupled with Beijing’s more muscular foreign and security policy overseas, has raised concerns among members of the Five Eyes intelligence sharing collective. All five members — Australia, Britain, Canada, New Zealand and the United States — have taken at least some steps toward limiting Huawei’s role in sensitive infrastructure. But at the same time, Huawei has become enmeshed in local economies. The company says its business in Australia alone is worth Aus dollars 650 million and has 700 employees, and its equipment is used directly or indirectly by half the population.last_img read more

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No Cong candidate from Jadavpur, Bankura, Asansol & Tamluk

first_imgKolkata: Congress has not nominated any candidate in the Jadavpur and Bankura Lok Sabha seats. The party has also not fielded any candidate in Asansol and Tamluk.In Bankura, veteran Trinamool Congress leader Subrata Mukherjee has been nominated, whereas CPI(M) has fielded Amiya Patra. In Jadavpur, actress Mimi Chakraborty of Trinamool Congress will fight against Bikas Ranjan Bhattacharya of CPI(M) and Anupam Hazra. Debabrata Biswas (Benu) has been nominated from Srirampur, while Nepal Mahato is fighting from Purulia against Mriganko Mahato of Trinamool Congress. In two important seats, Dum Dum and Barrackpore, the party has nominated Saurav Saha and Mohammad Alam. There will be a four-way fight in these two important constituencies. In Dum Dum, the sitting Trinamool Congress candidate Saugata Roy is fighting against Shamik Bhattacharya of BJP, Nepaldeb Bhattacharya of CPI(M) and Saurav Saha of Congress.last_img read more

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The Kohinoor of Indian cricket

first_imgThe Kohinoor, the famous Indian diamond in Persian means, the ‘Mountain of Light’. Presently, it is set in the crown of Queen Elizabeth and exhibited in the Tower of London. India has been vociferously asking for it to be returned, unfortunately, without much success. The Indian Premier League (IPL) is the Kohinoor of Indian and World cricket and truly a mountain of light for any young aspiring cricketer. Indian cricket needs to ensure that this gem does not lose its shine and glitter for years to come. The International Cricket Council (ICC), one gathers from some of their recent press reports, seems to be wanting to control and monitor the IPL and the other T20 leagues that have mushroomed in other parts of the cricketing world. The Indian board needs to be firm in keeping this gemstone away from any possible raiders. Also Read – A special kind of bondThe franchise-based tournament, that had its inception in 2008, has proven to be a phenomenal success, not only for the cricketers but also for the millions of cricket fans. The Board of Control for Cricket in India (BCCI) with IMG brought about a sparkling gem, the IPL, that revolutionised Indian cricket. The commercially viable league has attracted innovative marketers and corporate honchos. This should, in the next decade of the IPL, from the way it’s blossoming, bring forth technological brilliance for followers and viewers of the game. Also Read – Insider threat managementThe IPL has been a blessing for the present as well as for the past cricketers. Cricket-related jobs that once were non-existent have now become lucrative options for cricketers from all around the globe. The money that is being poured into the league has brought in professionalism into every aspect of the game. The buzz that the 2019 IPL has already created is phenomenal for Indian cricket. The popular cricket platform has cricket legends past and present dissecting performances and analysing it to the hilt. Cricket has touched the masses like never before. The T20 format was looked upon as a cricket circus, entertainment to enjoy and thereafter to forget. One never ever imagined that the 3+ hours cricket tournament would be considered in the same vein as Bollywood movie entertainment. The suspense that emerges from a make belief story of the cinema world would give way to a real-life tale on the cricket field. The performers, in this case, are not actors but real life heroes. The script, in this case, was not written on paper but made in heaven. The actors were cricket players with none of them being portrayed in the leading role. The 2008 IPL was the blockbuster that created a classic which India had never experienced before, especially in the world of sport. T20 Cricket became simple to follow and it soon became a family drama enjoyed by everyone. The shorter format made the game more uncertain and the cricket critics, who revelled in their knowledge of cricket and records, were no more seen as somebody special. The mathematics of cricket was made simple through the number of overs that a team played. Runs scored was all that mattered and in whatsoever manner, a player and team could. Cricket was shortened timewise and there was a definite outcome at the end. The IPL 2008 was, what one can term, as blessed in many ways. The phenomenal century in the first match by Brendon McCullum for the Kolkata Knight Riders (KKR), owned by Bollywood superstar Shah Rukh Khan, truly established the IPL as a thriller. Rajasthan Royals (RR), the final winners, brought additional spice to the league after their nail-biting victory against Chennai. The team was never ever thought of as one of the favourites to win and therefore, the result was ideal for popularising the tournament. Shane Warne, the master spinner, captained the side in the John Wayne style of a leading actor. His star performer from India was Yousuf Pathan, whom he communicated with more by body language than words. However, the icing on the cake was an unknown Indian cricketer from Goa, S. Asnodkar, who at that time became a household name. The young cricketer brought in the Indian family warmth and hospitality when he had Shane Warne and the RR team in Goa for a meal at his house. This was just the script the IPL required to showcase friendship, camaraderie and a feeling of oneness amongst the players themselves. Since then, Indian cricket has had many unknown faces becoming stars overnight. Jasprit Bumrah, considered the best-limited overs bowler in the world at present, is one of them. The IPL highlighted the performance of many young batsmen especially the likes of Paul Valthaty, Manish Pandey, Rahul Tripathi, Rishabh Pant, Shreyas Iyer, Sanju Samson, Robin Uthappa, Mandeep Singh and Naman Ojha. Some of them did make it to the Indian side, but most remained as a one-off success. However, unknowingly, the maximum benefit that Indian cricket has derived is from the bowlers. Jasprit Bumrah, Yazvendra Chahal, Kuldeep Yadav, R. Ashwin, Ravindra Jadeja, Amit Mishra, Pragyan Ojha, Mohit Sharma, Axar Patel, Jayant Yadav, Vinay Kumar, Dhaval Kulkarni, Kunal and Hardik Pandya, Bhuvneshwar Kumar, Manpreet Gony, Jaydev Unadkat, Siddarth Kaul have all played for the country. The IPL has been instrumental in bringing these talented Indian cricketers to the fore. The established Indian cricketers, as Virat Kohli has rightly stated, should play to enjoy the IPL. However, there are still two batting slots to be filled up for the World Cup. The IPL fever cannot be underestimated, the field is open for an Indian batter to become the darling of this crowd. An unknown superstar being catapulted onto the world stage would be just what dreams are made of for an aspiring cricketer. (The writer is a former Test cricketer. Views are strictly personal)last_img read more

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