Gov. Cuomo Signs Executive Order Banning Price Gouging On PPE

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) App users, tap here to watch video.ALBANY – New York Governor Andrew Cuomo is signing an executive order banning price gouging on PPE.The governor made the announcement during his Saturday Coronavirus briefing.PPE, or personal protective equipment, has been in short supply during the COVID-19 crisis. In some cases, prices for PPE have increased by a multiple of ten times their normal value.“The way to make sure people can get masks, we’re going to sign an executive order saying that, we will prosecute price gouging on PPE,” said Cuomo. “To give you an idea of where we were, the N- 95 masks, which we needed during the middle of the pandemic for the healthcare professionals before the pandemic we were paying 70 cents for a mask. In the middle of the pandemic, 7 dollars per mask for the same mask.”Governor Cuomo is signing another executive order allowing commercial buildings to take the temperature of people entering.The Governor says the move will help protect everyone inside.last_img read more

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Get a First Look at Kelli O’Hara in New Peter Pan Live! Promo

first_imgHey, look! They’re still flying, and they’ll continue to do so through December 4! Check out the brand new promo for NBC’s upcoming live telecast of Peter Pan, starring Allison Williams as the Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up. There’s even more singing, more Newsies Lost Boys and a glimpse of five-time Tony nominee Kelli O’Hara as Mrs. Darling. Only a couple of weeks to go until we catch these faces and more (including Christopher Walken, Christian Borle and Minnie Driver) live on NBC! View Commentslast_img read more

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Shut Up Sit Down & Eat Will Play Off-Broadway Again

first_img The cast/writing team is comprised of Tina Giorgi, Joe Moffa, Chris Monty and Eric Tartaglione. Eve Brandstein will direct. When a therapist fails to arrive on time for a group therapy session, four impatient Italian Americans decide to take their issues into their own hands. The play is considered a “plomedy”—that is, a cross between a play and stand-up comedy. Show Closed This production ended its run on Dec. 28, 2014 View Comments Shut Up Sit Down & Eat Related Shows Shut Up Sit Down & Eat…some more? The off-Broadway “plomedy” (see below) will return to New York this winter. Performances will resume at the Snapple Theater Center, where the show previously celebrated a run last year, from February 15 through May 31.last_img read more

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See Sarah Brightman Prepare For Her $52 Million Trip to Space

first_img View Comments Original Phantom of the Opera star Sarah Brightman is getting ready for a very important journey: she’s (finally) blasting off to space! Brightman paid $52 million for a 10-day stay on a Russian Soyuz space capsule. The star is currently undergoing nine months of space training in Russia, and if her Facebook page is any indication, everything is going great—as long as she stays healthy and doesn’t catch any more colds, she’ll rocket off in no time. Happy trails, Sarah!last_img read more

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Culturalist Challenge! Which HBO Series Should Become a Musical?

first_img View Comments The Broadway.com staff is crazy for Culturalist, the awesome site that lets you choose and rank your own top 10 lists. Each week, we’re challenging you with a new Broadway-themed topic to rank—we’ll announce the most popular choices on the new episode of The Broadway.com Show every Wednesday.Last week, in honor of composer Andrew Lloyd Webber’s 67th birthday, we asked you to rank his musicals, from Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat to Cats and beyond. The results are in, and the megahit The Phantom of the Opera came out on top. This week, we’ve been catching up on our TV, and with Girls, Looking and The Jinx, just to name a few, HBO has a bunch of shows that would make, um, interesting musicals, to say the least. So we’ve gotta know: Which HBO TV series do you want to see on the Great White Way? Broadway.com Features Editor Lindsay Champion posted her list of top 10 picks here!STEP 1—SELECT: Visit Culturalist to see all of your options. Highlight your 10 favorites and click the “continue” button.STEP 2—RANK: Reorder your 10 choices by dragging them into the correct spot on your list. Click the “continue” button.STEP 3—PREVIEW: You will now see your complete top 10 list. If you like it, click the “publish” button. (If you don’t have a Culturalist account yet, you will be asked to create one at this point.)Once your list is published, you can see the overall rankings of everyone on the aggregate list.Pick your favorites, then tune in for the results on the next episode of The Broadway.com Show!last_img read more

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Steamy Exclusive Photo of Tam Mutu & Kelli Barrett in Doctor Zhivago!

first_img Star Files Whoo, is it hot in here, or is it just us? No, it’s definitely Tam Mutu and Kelli Barrett, who are heating up New York City this spring in the romantic new musical Doctor Zhivago. Set in early 20th century Russia, the adaptation of the 1957 novel also stars Tom Hewitt, Paul Alexander Nolan and Laura Lee Gayer. Check out this exclusive production photo of the new musical, then see Doctor Zhivago on Broadway, opening April 21—and you might want to bring a personal fan or something. Related Shows Tam Mutu Show Closed This production ended its run on May 10, 2015center_img View Comments Doctor Zhivago Kelli Barrettlast_img read more

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Big Bang Theory’s Kunal Nayyar on Becoming Buddies with Co-Star Jesse Eisenberg in London’s The Spoils

first_img View Comments Kunal Nayyar has acquired a vast following on the back of playing Raj Koothrappali on CBS TV’s ever-popular The Big Bang Theory, but the London-born Indian actor is spending his summer hiatus on the London stage co-starring opposite Oscar nominee Jesse Eisenberg in Eisenberg’s play The Spoils, at the Trafalgar Studios. Broadway.com caught the ever-amiable Nayyar for a chat as he was in transit to the theater one recent evening.How’s the show going so far?British audiences have really embraced the play. We were told they were going to be more reserved and may not laugh as loudly, but the opposite seems to have been true. They understand the jokes and are laughing every two or three lines, which wasn’t the case off-Broadway.Do you think the production has deepened since New York?Well, I know for me at least that there’s a comfort the second time that comes from knowing that you’ve done it once and it worked. Last summer was about trying to get it right and I worked and worked on it and trusted it, and now that we’ve got it right, you just think, ‘Let’s get on stage and see what happens every night.’ That freedom is what you’re looking for.Is it odd having your co-star also be the playwright?The beauty of working with Jesse as an actor-writer, which sometimes can be difficult, is that he didn’t make an issue with the actors wanting to be able to make sense of the words in their own cadence. That gave us the freedom to be able to explore moments, though every time I tried to improvise a line, it wasn’t as good as what was already there.You play Kalyan, the Nepalese friend and roommate of Jesse’s privileged, often toxically outspoken Ben.What’s interesting is that the part is based on an actual friend of Jesse’s whom I’ve never met. Since we opened, he’s been in Kathmandu, but Jesse has shared letters that the real Kalyan has written and talks about him a lot.You and Jesse have a really palpable rapport on stage.I think we’re just very lucky in that we picked up right away as friends. Jesse had never seen The Big Bang Theory, so he didn’t know much about me when I was brought to his attention, but we’ve since become very close—almost like brothers. I don’t think you can go through a process like this for 18 months and not have that happen.Does that make it doubly painful in the play when Ben and Kalyan’s friendship goes south?Yes, I’m not sure by the end of the play that their rapport will ever be the same. The comment I get most after the play is, ‘What happens? Will Ben and Kalyan ever hang out again?’ And in my head, I think there will come a time when Kalyan reaches out to Ben to check on him and see how he’s doing.Is it hard to come down after a performance?You do feel when you’re doing a play as if you are living under a rock, and Jesse had said before that it would be so nice if every day we could just do a matinee. I know that after my big scene, I go backstage and let it all out. I have to have a martini or two to wind down.Was it tough to clear the decks in order to relocate for the run to London?It was probably mid-March when this began to gather steam, by which point I knew what dates I had available and so it all became real. The second thing I had to do was ask permission from my wife to move my entire life to London, though there was not an iota in my body that didn’t know this was the right move. The only thing is that we miss our dogs!You must know London reasonably well.I was born here—in Hounslow [west London]—but we moved to New Delhi when I was three, so I’ve got British citizenship. I don’t think it’s out of the norm that we might one day make London our home. It’s a lot closer to New Delhi, for one thing.A lot of your Big Bang colleagues have done stage work: do you guys sit around and trade theater chat between takes?Ha! Yes, I have an MFA in Acting from Temple University, Jim [Parsons] went to the Old Globe in San Diego and has done Broadway and Johnny [Galecki] grew up in Chicago doing plays before turning to the New York stage. So, theater is a huge part of our cast, and we talk about how lucky we are that being on Big Bang has given us the opportunity to go out and do it without worrying if we’re going to eat. Jesse Eisenberg & Kunal Nayyar in ‘The Spoils'(Photo: Oliver Rosser)last_img read more

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A Head-Scratcher of a Problem

first_imgJust the mention of them makes you scratch your head.Head lice.”They are tiny insects that live on human hair and feed on blood,” saidBeverly Sparks, a University of Georgia Extension Service entomologist. “They injectsaliva into the skin that causes itching.”For many Georgia school children this spring, they’re a very real itch. For parents,they’re a nightmare.Head lice are usually more prevalent among smaller children because they’re transmittedby direct contact. Smaller children usually have more close contact with each other thanolder children or adults.”Lice can also be transmitted through contact with clothing or other personalitems,” Sparks said. “If a person had head lice and had on a hat, and you putthe hat on right after they wore it, you could get them.”Head lice can survive off of a host for only about 48 hours,” she said.”So it takes pretty close contact to get them.”African-American children are usually spared the agony of head lice, thanks togenetics.”Head lice have front legs that look like a fish hook. That’s how they holdon,” Sparks explained. “Caucasians have round hairs that make it easy for themto grip and hold on. African-Americans have more oval, flat hairs, and the lice can’tanchor themselves.”How do you know if your child has head lice? And how do you stop them from spreading?”In school situations, when we identify head lice we recommend that everyone beinspected. We treat those who are infested,” Sparks said.”Some schools have a ‘no-nit’ policy,” she said, “meaning a child can’tcome back to school until no nits, or eggs, are visible.”If your child comes home with head lice, don’t panic. The cure is simple and can betaken care of overnight.”Use shampoos containing insecticides to kill the lice,” Sparks said.”In addition, you can physically remove them with a lice comb, or use a combinationof insecticide-containing shampoo and combing. Repeat the shampoo treatment in seven to 10days.”We recommend that along with the hair treatment you treat the materials theinfested person contacts, like pillows, bed linens, towels, brushes and combs,” shesaid. “Wash linens with soap and hot water and dry them in a dryer. Clean combs andbrushes with boiling water or lice shampoo.”There’s really no season for head lice.”Lice outbreaks occur when large numbers of kids come together,” Sparks said.That makes schools the perfect breeding grounds.If you think your child has come into contact with head lice, Sparks said,”Inspect, use the comb and shampoo treatment and follow up with daily hairinspections for 10 days. It’s no big deal.”last_img read more

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Fat Warning.

first_imgJust when you figured out the new food pyramid and nutritional values on food labels, the Food and Drug Administration is proposing another change.The FDA proposes requiring the amount of trans fatty acids in a food to be included in the Nutrition Facts panel.The proposal would also define “trans fat free” and set a limit on trans fatty acids wherever there are limits on saturated fat in nutrient content or health claims.Why Use Trans Fats?Connie Crawley, an Extension Service food and nutrition specialist with the University of Georgia College of Family and Consumer Sciences, said trans fatty acids are in many foods.”Trans fatty acids are unsaturated fats that have become saturated fats by adding hydrogen to them,” she said. “This hydrogenation makes them more stable and solid. They have more volume and texture and work better for baking. They make foods feel and look better.”They keep food from going stale so fast, too. “Manufacturers can make products farther ahead because they can keep them on the shelf longer,” Crawley said.Trans fat is found in vegetable shortenings, some margarines, crackers, cookies, snacks and other foods.”If you make anything with shortening rather than oil, it’s flakier and lighter,” Crawley said.Hard On Your HeartBut when it comes to food that’s good for you, looks aren’t everything.”Research shows that trans fat has as negative an effect on serum cholesterol as saturated fat,” Crawley said. “It’s similar structurally. There seems to be a connection between trans fat and heart disease.”The American Heart Association says heart disease kills about 500,000 Americans each year. It’s the No. 1 U.S. cause of death.Crawley said labels now address heart disease prevention much more than nutritional deficiencies.”We’re more into health now and the best diet so we can have the highest quality of life for the longest time,” she said.The proposed rule on trans fatty acids would require adding the amount of trans fat per serving to the amount of saturated fat per serving. The amount and percent Daily Value per serving on the Nutrition Facts panel will be based on the sum of the two.An asterisk would be required after the heading “Saturated fat” to refer to a footnote showing the grams of trans fat. The footnote would be optional on foods that contain less than 0.5 grams per serving, except when a fatty acid or cholesterol claim is made.Minimize Exposure”This new label will help people minimize exposure to saturated fat and trans fatty acids,” Crawley said. “It’s almost impossible to avoid these fats. But this will help consumers regulate how much they’re eating.”But the label only works in foods you prepare yourself.”Only an estimated 20 percent of trans fatty acids are in labeled foods,” Crawley said. “Most of what we eat is in restaurants, mostly fried and baked foods, where foods aren’t labeled. The public that eats out a lot won’t know how much they’re eating.”But, she said, “if you eat fried foods in restaurants, be assured you’re probably getting plenty of trans fatty acids.”Most restaurant fried foods are high in trans fatty acids, she said, because cooking oils that contain them taste better and last longer.”Some major food companies offer a trans fatty acid-reduced shortening,” Crawley said. “But there won’t be any motivation for restaurants to change until there is a public outcry.”The bottom line: avoid fried foods.”If you’re going to eat fat, use oil,” Crawley said. “If you eat oil, go with peanut, canola or olive oils. But don’t use much of that either.”last_img read more

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Garden math

first_imgBy Mike IsbellUniversity of GeorgiaMy dad, who retired after 42 years in education, once told me, “Mike, your idea of school is this: if a grade of 70 is passing and you make 71, that’s a waste of one point!”I’ve got to admit I didn’t make the best grades in high school — especially in math. School was just too much fun! Why ruin the fun by having to learn something?Well, a few too many low grades and a couple of stern lectures got my attention. Of course, the Vietnam War got my attention, too.Now I’m learning math all over for fun. I even bought an algebra book for myself this summer. And you know, this stuff’s pretty neat.I bought it in case I ever have to help Jordan, my youngest daughter, with her algebra. But the few times I’ve tried to help her, she’s said, “That’s not the way my teacher showed us how to do those problems. You’re just going to mess me up.”We’ll always have to do mathWe’ll always have to do math. And unless you stay in practice, you may not remember what you are supposed to do to figure out math problems.That was the case the other day when a fellow came in for me to interpret a soil test report he got from the University of Georgia’s soil test lab.Soils in Georgia are seldom perfect. Most can be improved in some way to ensure the best plant growth. A sample of the soil can be tested at the lab, and the report will provide you a recommendation for lime and fertilizer based on the analysis.Fall is the best time to test your soil. If you need help with your soil test results, come by your county extension office. You and your county agent can put your math skills to work.Garden math isn’t so hardFor home lawns and gardens, the soil report is simple. It will tell the amount and kind of fertilizer you need for every 1,000 square feet of lawn or garden you have — 5-10-15 and 10-10-10 are examples of the fertilizers these reports might recommend.That’s not so hard.The soil report is a bit harder for commercial and farm use. It tells you the pounds of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium you need to improve the nutrient level in the soil.The problem is you don’t just apply nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium. You apply something like ammonium nitrate (34 percent nitrogen), superphosphate (20 percent phosphorus) and potash (60 percent potassium). So you have to use your math skills to calculate how much you actually have to apply.And if you don’t remember your math — well, you’ve got a problem.last_img read more

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