Cops did right thing with rabid raccoon

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion Now it all makes sense. I listened with a open mind when I heard that the Ravena Coeymans Police Department had run over a raccoon. The response was immediate that the police were barbarians who should be put away forever.I tried for two days to tell a different story of a rabid raccoon, and guess what? There’s not one TV station that wants to hear it because it doesn’t fit in with their agenda.I was chased down our road a while back by a rabid raccoon (which this one turned out to be). I was running for my life when more than four cars drove by and swerved around the raccoon while I was running to avoid being bit by it. Not one person stopped to help me out or took care of that raccoon. Well, my hats are off to those police who did the right thing.If you have never been in contact with, or been chased by, a rabid animal, then your opinion in this case is worthless. The fear and the reality that you will have to go through so many shots to avoid rabies is beyond belief. But as usual, the police are always in the wrong by all the people who have nothing better to do than to tweet and Facebook their lack of understanding. I say thanks to the police in all ways.Denise CrisciScotiaMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationSchenectady teens accused of Scotia auto theft, chase; Ended in Clifton Park crash, Saratoga Sheriff…Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censuslast_img read more

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Development goes west

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Mayfair/St James’s Thoroughly modern Mayfair

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Hammerson eyes £190m Shires buy

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LandSec in Stag move

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Chelsfield lifted by internet hotel market improvement

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PREMIUMKPK Law may hinder Indonesia’s performance in corruption perception index

first_imgIndonesia has made improvements in the Corruption Perception Index (CPI), Transparency International Indonesia (TTI) has announced, but the country would struggle to maintain the momentum in the face of the new Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) Law.   The index ranks countries by their perceived levels of public sector corruption, as determined by expert assessments and surveys.Indonesia achieved a score of 40 out of 100 in 2019, a 2-point increase from 38 in the previous year. The new score puts the country on par with Burkina Faso, Guyana, Lesotho, Trinidad and Tobago and Kuwait, which also achieved a score of 40 in the index.Indonesia ranks 85 out of 180 countries, a significant jump from 89 in 2018.TII general secretary Dadang Trisasongko noted that the index assessed the opinions of Indonesian respondents — comprising experts and businesspeople … KPK Transparency-International-Indonesia transparency-international Jokowi Indonesia corruption Linkedin LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Facebook Google Forgot Password ? Topics : Log in with your social accountlast_img read more

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Hundreds of djembe drum producers in Blitar stop production because of COVID-19 outbreak

first_imgTo make matters worse, the drum makers had bought large amounts of raw materials in the beginning of January, since demand from China usually peaked between March and May every year.Sentul subdistrict has long been known as a handicraft center in Blitar and produces traditional toys and household items made of wood.In 2005, handicraft makers in Sentul began to produce djembe drums to fulfill demand from Bali. In 2015, a group of buyers from China ordered tens of thousands of djembe drums as a trial order after visiting Sentul. This high demand for djembe drums from Chinese buyers encouraged many more people in Blitar to start getting into the business.Now, there are djembe drum makers in six districts across Blitar city and Blitar regency, shipping a total of around 200 containers or 600,000 drums to China every year, around 95 percent of their total production capacity.With an average price of about Rp 75,000 (US$5.46), the annual sale of djembe drums from Blitar to China amounts to around Rp 45 billion. Finer quality drums used by professional musicians sell for around Rp 850,000 apiece. The djembe drums for the Chinese market are made of mahogany and goat hide and range from 30 centimeters to 65 cm in length. “A few of us are now trying to turn to the domestic market by producing housewares and traditional toys while waiting for Chinese market to open again,” Sugeng said.Demand from Bali also remains stable, he said, but only for smaller drums that are usually used by furniture exporters as container fillers. Blitar Culture and Tourism Agency head Tri Iman Prasetyono said the halt in djembe drum production affected thousands of people in Blitar since djembe production had maintained traditional production methods that enabled many people to participate in the production chain.”Housewives can do some jobs – such as painting, polishing and piecing together the leather – in their own homes,” he said, adding that the traditional production methods, especially in Sentul, had become a tourist attraction. Tri added, however, that he believed the situation would get back to normal in the coming months. Topics : Sugeng said his Chinese buyer had not contacted him since the cancelation, leaving him in confusion as to how he would earn money to pay monthly installments for the loans he has taken out for the business.He now has at least 1,000 unfinished djembe drums in his warehouse as a result of the cancelation.Sugeng is one of dozens of djembe drum producers in Blitar who run medium-sized workshops with an average production capacity of 13,500 drums a month. There are a few other drum producers with a larger production capacity, but most are home industry-scale businesses.Hundreds of other djembe drum producers in Blitar have faced similar problems since the coronavirus first broke out. “But we no longer see the busy neighborhood in Sentul. We used to see the housewives painting those drums on their front porches,” he said. Hundreds of djembe drum makers in Blitar, East Java, who depend mainly on the Chinese market, have been severely hit by the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak in that country.”On Jan. 28, my buyer in China ordered nine containers but he canceled it only three days later,” Sugeng Harianto, 37, a djembe drum maker from Sentul subdistrict, Kepanjenkidul district, told The Jakarta Post on Saturday.Djembe drums, a traditional African musical instrument made of wood and sheep or goat hide, have been a popular product for craftsmen in Blitar since 2015, due to a surge in demand from China.last_img read more

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Mexican men confront machismo culture in therapy to combat violence against women

first_img‘Violence, domination and force’ “Masculinity has always been associated with violence, domination and force, but now that’s changing. New (perceptions of) masculinity propose the idea of promoting equal treatment of men and women,” said psychotherapist and Gendes director Mauro Vargas.He aims to teach the 1,200 men per year who attend his meetings to understand and confront the different types of violence against women: sexual, physical, economic, verbal and cyber.Mexico has long faced governmental indifference and ineffective policies when it comes to tackling violence against women.Women have begun to take to the streets to demand immediate action to reduce the number of femicides, which grew by 136 percent between 2015 and 2019.Two brutal murders last month, including that of a seven-year-old girl, highlighted the issue ahead of International Women’s Day March 8 and ignited protests. Vargas says daily occurrences such as wolf whistling, sharing photos of naked women or sexist comments about female colleagues perpetuate an inequality that results in violence against women.The therapy at Gendes helps men “unlearn what society has taught them within a macho and misogynistic environment,” said Vargas. Founded in 2009, Gendes conducts studies about social inequality and supports activism in a bid to rehabilitate male chauvinists. In an improvised therapy room in a large house in the center of Mexico City, a group of men aged between 20 and 70 close their eyes, inhale and exhale.Each places his hand on his heart and — in a moment of honest reflection — takes time to think about the violence he inflicted on women and the consequences of those actions.”I’m Jaime. This week I committed verbal and emotional violence against my partner. I’m here to help and be helped,” said a 63-year-old before a dozen other men replied in unison: “I will help you.”  ‘A man in deconstruction’ Although there is no official data on their numbers, groups exploring a non-traditional type of masculinity to break from a patriarchal culture are multiplying in Mexico.Using mostly social medial, men organize meetings in spots such as urban art galleries or book shops to debate their role in a growing feminism movement.But Arturo Reyes, a 29-year-old psychologist and an instructor at Gendes, says he believes men cannot themselves be feminists.”There are allies to feminism, but there are no men feminists. The fight is for women only,” said Reyes.He says machismo is “a cultural decision” rather than an individual affliction.”A macho in rehabilitation is a man in deconstruction,” he added.In the house in the central Roma neighborhood of Mexico City, those in therapy fix their eyes on the floor.When they’re ready, they raise their faces, take a deep breath and drum up the courage to relate their own personal experiences.One visibly stressed man confesses to having assaulted his son.For Reyes, the most satisfying element of the therapy is when one of the men approaches him afterwards with a hug and says: “Thanks to these sessions, my wife and children can now approach me without fear.”center_img Mexico is suffering from a femicide crisis, with 10 women murdered every day, and increasingly men are questioning the prevalent male chauvinism — or machismo — deeply entrenched in society.”I’ve never been physically violent with a woman, but yes I’ve done it in other forms: emotionally, verbally and sexually because several times I was unfaithful,” said Jaime, who withheld his surname to protect his family.”I recognize that and I want to change.”Jaime approached Gendes, a gender and development center,  a couple of years ago on his partner’s advice as they struggled with relationship problems. Topics :last_img read more

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In Indian capital, riots deepen a Hindu-Muslim divide

first_imgFor years, Hindus and Muslims lived and worked peacefully together in Yamuna Vihar, a densely populated Delhi district.But the riots that raged through the district last month appear to have cleaved lasting divisions in the community, reflecting a nationwide trend as tensions over the Hindu nationalist agenda of Prime Minister Narendra Modi boil over.Many Hindus in Yamuna Vihar, a sprawl of residential blocks and shops dotted with mosques and Hindu temples, and in other riot-hit districts of northeast Delhi, say they are boycotting merchants and refusing to hire workers from the Muslim community. Muslims say they are scrambling to find jobs at a time when the coronavirus pandemic has heightened pressure on India’s economy. “We have proof to show that Muslims started the violence, and now they are blaming it on us,” Dhingra said. “This is their pattern as they are criminal-minded people.”Those views were widely echoed in interviews with 25 Hindus in eight localities in northeast Delhi, many of whom suffered large-scale financial damages or were injured in the riots. Reuters also spoke with about 30 Muslims, most of whom said that Hindus had decided to stop working with them.Suman Goel, a 45-year-old housewife who has lived among Muslim neighbours for 23 years, said the violence had left her in a state of shock.”It’s strange to lose a sense of belonging, to step out of your home and avoid smiling at Muslim women,” she said. “They must be feeling the same too but it’s best to maintain a distance.”Mohammed Taslim, a Muslim who operated a business selling shoes from a shop owned by a Hindu in Bhajanpura, one of the neighbourhoods affected by the riots, said his inventory was destroyed by a Hindu mob.He was then evicted and his space was leased out to a Hindu businessman, he said.”This is being done just because I am a Muslim,” said Taslim.Many Muslims said the attack had been instigated by hardline Hindus to counter protests involving tens of thousands of people across India against the new citizenship law.”This is the new normal for us,” said Adil, a Muslim research assistant with an economic think tank in central Delhi. “Careers, jobs and business are no more a priority for us. Our priority now is to be safe and to protect our lives.”He declined to disclose his full name for fear of reprisals.Emboldened by Modi’s landslide electoral victory in 2014, hardline groups began pursuing a Hindu-first agenda that has come at the expense of the country’s Muslim minority.Vigilantes have attacked and killed a number of Muslims involved in transporting cows, which are seen as holy animals by Hindus, to slaughterhouses in recent years. The government has also adopted a tough stance with regard to Pakistan, and in August withdrew semi-autonomous privileges for Jammu and Kashmir, India’s only Muslim-majority state.In November, the Supreme Court ruled that a Hindu temple could be built at Ayodhya, where a right-wing mob tore down a 16th-century mosque in 1992, a decision that was welcomed by the Modi government.The citizenship law, which eases the path for non-Muslims from neighbouring Muslim-majority nations to gain citizenship in India, was the final straw for many Muslims, as well as secular Indians, sparking nationwide protests.Modi’s office did not respond to questions from Reuters about the latest violence.Night Vigilantes During the day, Hindus and Muslims shun each other in the alleys of the Delhi districts that were hardest hit by the unrest in February. At night, when the threat of violence is greater, they are physically divided by barricades that are removed in the morning.And in some areas, permanent barriers are being erected.On a recent evening, Tarannum Sheikh, a schoolteacher, sat watching two welders install a high gate at the entrance of a narrow lane to the Muslim enclave of Khajuri Khas, where she lives. The aim was to keep Hindus out, she said.”We keep wooden batons with us to protect the entrance as at any time, someone can enter this alley to create trouble,” she said. “We do not trust the police anymore.”In the adjacent Hindu neighbourhood of Bhajanpura, residents expressed a similar mistrust and sense of insecurity.”In a way these riots were needed to unite Hindus, we did not realise that we were surrounded by such evil minds for decades,” said Santosh Rani, a 52-year-old grandmother.She said she had been forced to lower her two grandchildren from the first floor of her house to the street below after the building was torched in the violence, allegedly by a Muslim.”This time the Muslims have tested our patience and now we will never give them jobs,” said Rani who owns several factories and retail shops. “I will never forgive them.”Hasan Sheikh, a tailor who has stitched clothing for Hindu and Muslim women for over 40 years, said Hindu customers came to collect their unstitched clothes after the riots.”It was strange to see how our relationship ended,” said Sheikh, who is Muslim. “I was not at fault, nor were my women clients, but the social climate of this area is very tense. Hatred on both sides is justified.”Topics : “I have decided to never work with Muslims,” said Yash Dhingra, who has a shop selling paint and bathroom fittings in Yamuna Vihar. “I have identified new workers, they are Hindus,” he said, standing in a narrow lane that was the scene of violent clashes in the riots that erupted on Feb. 23.The trigger for the riots, the worst sectarian violence in the Indian capital in decades, was a citizenship law introduced last year that critics say marginalises India’s Muslim minority. Police records show at least 53 people, mostly Muslims, were killed and more than 200 were injured.Dhingra said the unrest had forever changed Yamuna Vihar. Gutted homes with broken doors can be seen across the neighbourhood; electricity cables melted in the fires dangle dangerously above alleys strewn with stones and bricks used as makeshift weapons in the riots.Most Hindu residents in the district are now boycotting Muslim workers, affecting everyone from cooks and cleaners to mechanics and fruit sellers, he said.last_img read more

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