Group to make beds from bags

first_imgThere is more to a plastic bag than carrying groceries, senior Monica Aguirre, president of Saint Mary’s Environmental Action Coalition (SMEAC), said. The Coalition will be collecting plastic bags to make sleeping mats and send them abroad to disaster victims and several community organizations, Aguirre said. “We plan to contact a few organizations within the South Bend community, in order to see if they will take a few completed mats and hand them out to anyone living on the streets who would be interested,” she said. “They are very lightweight and weather resistant.” SMEAC advisor Cassie Majetic, a professor of biology, said the practice is popular around the country right now. “I actually first heard about this idea over the summer from my mother, who is a teacher and Girl Scouts volunteer,” Majetic said. “Since then, we’ve found numerous examples of youth and volunteer groups doing this, and SMEAC decided they want to be a part of it.” Right now, the group is collecting plastic bags from students outside 252 Science Hall at the College until Earth Week, which is April 17 to 23. Aguirre said students will be making the mats during the week. “During Earth Week, we will host a workshop teaching interested students how to make the mats, we will provide the bags as well, each student will then be responsible for turning in the completed mats before finals week,” Aguirre said. Majetic said it is important for students to save all their bags because it takes 500 to 700 plastic bags to create one mat. “Each [plastic] bag is cut apart and the loops are tied together to make plastic yarn, which is then crocheted into a mat,” Majetic said. “Each mat requires 500 to 700 individual bags, so we need as many donations as we can get.” Aside from the bag collection, the group is also conducting a school-wide recycling survey, Aguirre said. “Well we have a recycling survey out now,” Aguirre said. “Our club hopes to discover creative, new ways we can educate the campus about how to recycle. So anyone can complete it, it just takes about five minutes.” SMEAC’s main goal is to make Saint Mary’s a more environmentally-friendly campus, she said. “The Environmental Action Coalition is a club that works to educate the campus about environmental issues,” Aguirre said. “We want people to feel that they can personally make a difference with the simple choices they make.”last_img read more

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Committed to Compost

first_imgFor millennia, farmers used compost to return nutrients to depleted soil. Now researchers are searching for a way composting can help battle aflatoxin.Ghana native Esther Yeboah Akoto, who is currently pursuing her master’s degree in food science and technology at the University of Georgia, is working to help farmers diminish aflatoxin contamination in their soil by composting field waste.“We know that composting has been around for a very long time. It’s a technique that growers have used for thousands of years,” said Akoto, who is conducting her research in conjunction with U.S. Feed the Future’s Peanut Mycotoxin and Innovation Lab at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.“More recently, we know about aflatoxin and its effect on health. Could composting provide a way to remove aflatoxin-contaminated produce from the food supply?”Researchers around the world are working to minimize naturally occurring molds that can grow on peanuts, maize and other crops. Those molds diminish the quality of peanut crops and generate mycotoxins such as aflatoxin, a dangerous compound that can cause physical and mental stunting in children, cause cancer and, in high doses, even kill. Obviously, the most effective intervention is to minimize mold growth in the field and in storage, but farmers may never completely get rid of something as ubiquitous as mold.For farmers and producers, particularly those in food-insecure areas, finding a use for crop waste and contaminated food is vital — no one wants to waste part of the crop. In the case of peanuts, Akoto found that many farmers in her home country of Ghana would simply put crop waste back into the ground as a soil amendment, reintroducing the toxin-causing molds.“There is waste from each season of peanuts, but what are we going to do with it?” she said. “Since there is a possibility that aflatoxin can be taken up by plants directly from the soil, we want to be sure that the aflatoxin is broken down.“Composting is a very simple technology and farmers need fertilizer. Now, let’s see how composting can be used to break down aflatoxin before farmers put compost back into their fields.”Microbes, including bacteria, fungi and protozoa, have been shown to break down aflatoxin, but Akoto wanted to see how quickly and under what circumstances the decomposition occurred.“We have found that some microorganisms can break down aflatoxin, which is a promising thing,” she said.After adding three commercially sold composting starters to contaminated peanut meal, Akoto evaluated the results over six weeks to see how quickly the aflatoxin broke down.Akoto worked with her graduate mentor Jinru Chen, professor of food science and technology in the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, to test the amounts of aflatoxin left in the compost. Chen’s research focuses on developing molecular detection and typing protocols for pathogens and bacteria that impact food safety.The aflatoxin level decreased throughout the test, and it dropped most quickly in the first two weeks. Some aflatoxin persisted even after six weeks of composting.Akoto performed the tests at UGA’s Griffin Campus and replicated the work at home in Ghana.“We wanted to see how it would work in Ghana to make sure that the conditions were realistic and the data didn’t just come from the lab,” she said.In Ghana, some of the starting samples contained 3,000 parts per billion (ppb) of aflatoxin, but that level dropped by 1,000 in just a week. In the U.S., 20 ppb is acceptable for consumption.The results held other good news for those farmers without much money for inputs. The samples that weren’t treated with composting starter or accelerant broke down aflatoxin as fast as the samples that were treated.“It’s a plus for farmers that you don’t need to go buy a product. All you need is peanut meal; it has its own microflora,” she said. “If you are giving farmers a new reason to use known technology and, at the same time, telling them it won’t cost anything … that’s a bonus.”Akoto’s father was a cocoa farmer, and she spent time in the fields near Kumasi, Ghana, as a child.“I enjoyed harvesting oranges and learning about what happens on the farm,” she said. That developed into a wider interest in food safety from the field, to the market or processor, to the final consumer.“At the market in Ghana, I see food safety issues and think, ‘We still have a long way to go,’” Akoto said.Akoto is scheduled to complete her master’s degree in food science from the University of Georgia this fall and hopes to continue working toward a doctorate.For more information being done by PMIL at UGA visit pmil.caes.uga.edu and for more information about the research being conducted at the UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Department of Food Science and Technology visit www.foodscience.caes.uga.edu.last_img read more

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The History of The Festy and This Year’s Lineup

first_imgIn 2015, we are all excited to celebrate 6 years of The Festy Experience, but we’re celebrating more than the music, the location and the Experience itself. We’re celebrating the successful venture of 2 small local businesses that continue giving back to the community that has helped nurture The Festy to grow into the annual event we all look forward to every Columbus Day weekend. Buy your tickets now! ——1) The Festy is a sustainability-minded, family-loving, camping festival celebrating music and the outdoor lifestyle, with craft beer, local fare and features headliners such as Lyle Lovett & John Hiatt, The Infamous Stringdusters, Sam Bush, Brett Dennen and more. 2) We are in our 6th year, this will be our last at the Devils Backbone property. New location in Nelson County coming soon. 3) All proceeds benefit Common Ground Healing Arts. 4) The event is presented by Blue Ridge Outdoors Magazine–and they are hosting the Blue Ridge Burn again, the 5K & 10K race on-site. The idea of The Festy Experience first came together in 2009, but its roots in Virginia can be traced back decades through its creator Michael Allenby. Micheal grew up in Virginia and attended high school in Williamsburg before relocating to Charlottesville, VA and establishing his own small business within the music world: The Artist Farm.Screen Shot 2015-09-29 at 4.46.28 PMFocusing today on producing experiences that bring people together, the company originally provided management services to artists and musicians, counting The Infamous Stringdusters as one of their clients. The Stringdusters and Michael had been discussing the possibility of creating a festival in either Virginia or Colorado, based on The Stringdusters’ years of experience attending and performing at various festivals around the country.Screen Shot 2015-09-29 at 4.31.38 PMIn August of 2009, The Infamous Stringdusters played the Brew Ridge Trail Music Festival on the grounds of Devils Backbone Brewery in Nelson County.  After Brew Ridge, it became obvious that Justin, Michael and The Stringdusters all shared the same vision for an idyllic fall camping experience and decided that Devils Backbone Basecamp in Nelson County, VA was a perfect location within the Blue Ridge Mountains. When The Stringdusters returned to Charlottesville later that fall to record their album “Things That Fly”, then-Cerberus, The Artist Farm, and The Stringdusters began planning what became The Festy Experience.Screen Shot 2015-09-29 at 4.39.53 PM Like with many new ventures, there was a challenge coming up with the right name for the proposed event.  The group used the placeholder “The Festy” (a common and generic term used to describe a festival) to refer to the event until a proper name was generated.  At the same time, it became apparent that curating the right “experience” was going to be essential to the success and sustainability of the event.  As planning continued, the name The Festy Experience took hold… and the rest is history.last_img read more

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Trail Dames Hiking Summit to Reconvene in July

first_imgCULLOWHEE, North Carolina—Trail Dames, the nation’s only hiking and backpacking conference for women, has just announced its next Summit will take place July 13-15, 2018 at Western Carolina University in Cullowhee, North Carolina.  The Trail Dames Summit is inclusive, welcoming anyone who identifies as a woman and has a desire to enjoy the great outdoors. Trail Dames cover the gamut from armchair dreamers and complete novices to seasoned backpackers and hiking aficionados. All are welcome.Formed in 2011 by Anna Huthmaker, who is affectionately called “Mud Butt” on the trail, Trail Dames is for all fitness levels, sizes and persuasions. “The road to Trail Dames really started in 2003, when I attempted to hike the Appalachian Trail. I took six months off from work to hike 700 miles, breaking my foot along the way. Yet out there in the woods, I met more amazing people than ever before in my life. And all the while I could not help but notice the complete lack of women, especially women who were overweight. I was alone on a new frontier.”Realizing there was no established forum for women hikers and backpackers to connect and learn, Anna spent the winter of 2011 visualizing women on the trails and mapped ways to develop a network. “I thought of warmer days, sunny skies and the laughter of women ringing out over the trail. And I dreamed of meeting other like-minded women from around the country in the splendor of the woods.” And so the Trail Dames Summit was born. Since then, the Summit has grown to a biannual event with clinicians, speakers, vendors, and awards to recognize, support and celebrate women in the outdoors.  The 2018 Summit will offer clinics and unique classes on planning a long distance hike, first aid in the outdoors, map and compass reading, hiking overseas, slackpacking the Appalachian Trail, and creating a hiking blog. The weekend will also include sessions on yoga for hiking, walking meditation, and silent walks.The 2018 keynote speaker is Carla Robertson, founder of Wild and White Blazing.  She is an accomplished Appalachian Trail thru-hiker and the creator of Living Wild and Precious. The event will also feature book signings, gear vendors, and a silent auction to benefit the Trail Dames Charitable Foundation.For more information about how you can join three days of laughter, learning, and dreaming with women who share a love for the outdoors, visit www.traildamessummit.com.last_img read more

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Bar reviews fees for CLE accreditations

first_img Bar reviews fees for CLE accreditationsThe Board of Governors has given preliminary approval of a change in the fees the Bar charges CLE providers to evaluate their courses for accreditation.The board at its Sarasota meeting approved on first reading the changes to the Series 500 policies of the Board of Legal Education and Specialization.BLSE Chair Norman Vaughan-Birch told the board the changes fell into two categories: editorial and adjustments to the accreditation fees. Some fees were lowered, others were raised, and the overall impact is expected to increase revenues to the Bar by $104,000, he said.The changes will come back to the board for final approval in October. September 15, 2002 Regular News Bar reviews fees for CLE accreditationslast_img read more

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FSU, St. Thomas team up to go hi-tech

first_imgFSU, St. Thomas team up to go hi-tech FSU, St. Thomas team up to go hi-tech Melinda Melendez Assistant Editor The familiar sound of pens and pencils feverishly scratching notebook paper is a thing of the past at most law schools. The clicking of swift keystrokes and the soft glow of individual laptop screens fill today’s lecture halls.Law schools are now matching their tech-savvy students by offering classes that utilize videoconferencing technology. The Florida State University College of Law and St. Thomas University School of Law have teamed up to present a fully interactive class on Florida Constitutional Law featuring the use of videoconferencing technology.“This is the first time we’ve tried this particular program at this campus, but this really is something for the future, and we’re hoping to do this many more times,” said St. Thomas University School of Law Dean Bob Butterworth.Former ABA President Sandy D’Alemberte and L. Clayton Roberts, who currently serves as executive deputy attorney general, co-teach the class from both campuses. The videoconferencing technology allows for teachers to literally be in two places at once, exposing law students to sources of expertise they may not have otherwise.“This class got its origin in that Sandy and I were slated to teach state con law here at FSU,” Roberts said. “Because Sandy is such an expert, Dean Butterworth wanted him to come and teach at St. Thomas in the spring semester, also.”D’Alemberte arranged that he and Roberts would teach for some time at both schools, and use videoconferencing technology to allow students at both universities to participate in the class.“I think a real benefit is going to be in the seminar-type classes where you have experts who are the leading authority on various subjects,” Dean Butterworth said. “This [technology] allows the students to have access to the most eminent constitutional law scholar in the country. It’s a great thing to be able to offer this to our students.”Roberts agreed, “All the law schools have someone who is the expert in a subject matter. . . this will allow students the opportunity to take classes with the experts.”In addition to videoconferencing technology, students from both schools will have access to “Blackboard,” a Web-based forum where teachers can post assignments, grades, and lecture notes, and students may post discussions and files.The class will be taught at FSU and St. Thomas during the Spring 2005 semester, and Dean Butterworth said that St. Thomas is planning to utilize this technology increasingly in the future. February 1, 2005 Assistant Editor Regular Newslast_img read more

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Long Island Marathon Returns Sunday

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Thousands of runners will compete in the annual Long Island Marathon on Sunday.The full 26-mile race, a half marathon and 10K all kick off at the Charles Lindbergh Boulevard starting line at 8 a.m. The races conclude with a Finish Line Festival at Eisenhower Park in East Meadow from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.As usual, the event will include a heavy police presence with limited public access and spectators being subjected to bag searches. There will also be widespread road closures.Charles Lindbergh Boulevard will be closed from 5 a.m. to 10 a.m. Merrick Avenue will be closed north of Hempstead Turnpike from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m. And Old Country Road will be closed from Post Avenue to School Street from 7:40 a.m. to 10 a.m., as will be School Street from Old Country Road to Railroad Avenue, which will be closed from 7:50 a.m. to 10 a.m.In addition, Salisbury Park Drive and Carman Avenue between Old Country Road and Nottingham Road will be closed from 7:50 a.m. to 2 p.m. Post Avenue will be closed from Railroad Avenue to Jericho Turnpike from 7:50 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. And the eastbound lanes of Jericho Turnpike will be closed from 7:50 a.m. to 11 a.m. between Post Avenue to Brush Hollow Road, which will be closed from 7:50 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.And lastly, Wantagh State Parkway will be closed from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m.For more information, visit thelimarathon.comlast_img read more

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Acclaimed broadcast journalist Koppel keynotes 2016 CUNA GAC

first_imgAward-winning broadcast journalist and former Nightline host Ted Koppel will be a keynote speaker at the 2016 CUNA Governmental Affairs Conference (GAC), which runs Feb. 21-25 in Washington, D.C.Koppel is best known for his 26 years as anchor and managing editor of ABC’s Nightline. His career has been recognized by every major award in broadcast journalism, including eight George Peabody Awards, 11 duPont-Columbia Awards and 42 Emmys. Today, Koppel serves as a contributor to NBC News, BBC America and National Public Radio. He is also a best-selling author and a columnist for major publications such as The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.“Ted Koppel brings a keen perspective on the threat of cyberattacks in today’s world. His experience, knowledge and renowned investigative techniques provide a sobering analysis into the importance of cybersecurity,” says CUNA president/CEO Jim Nussle. “It’s an honor to welcome him to our event.”For his keynote presentation, Koppel will explore ideas from his New York Times Best Seller Lights Out: A Cyberattack, A Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath. Koppel will discuss the probability of a cyberattack on the United States’ power grid, its potential consequences, and the actions needed to prevent a catastrophe. As credit unions face their own litany of cyber threats, attendees will find his insights into modern cybersecurity eye-opening. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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What’s not to love about this designer beachside penthouse?

first_imgThe internal lift at 3250/23 Ferny Avenue, Surfers Paradise.Created over two years, this elegant penthouse required challenging structural changes to become a showcase for the latest design ideas from around the globe. 3250/23 Ferny Avenue, Surfers Paradise. 3250/23 Ferny Avenue, Surfers Paradise. 3250/23 Ferny Avenue, Surfers Paradise.The price of this Gold Coast penthouse has been slashed by several million dollars with hope someone will snap up the designer home. Imagine having breakfast here at 3250/23 Ferny Avenue, Surfers Paradise.Expanses of glass in every room capture 360 degree panoramic views over the city, beaches, the blue Pacific Ocean, main river and Gold Coast hinterland.There are no painted walls, but panels of timber veneer, smoked glass, imported marble or lustrous lacquered finishes in a caramel tone.Living areas, featuring the finest in Italian designer furniture, look out to the nearby ocean, capturing a dazzling cityscape of lights after dark. 3250/23 Ferny Avenue, Surfers Paradise.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home2 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor2 hours agoMr Kollosche said even with the price reduction, if the property sold, it would be the highest price for an apartment sale on the Gold Coast.He said buyers from interstate and from Brisbane had shown a keen interest in the property. 3250/23 Ferny Avenue, Surfers Paradise.The four-bedroom, five-bathroom penthouse is at 3250/23 Ferny Avenue and is part of the Towers of Chevron Renaissance, crowning the main building on the 39th and 40th levels.Kollosche Prestige Agents – Broadbeach selling agent Michael Kollosche said the property was reduced from $12,500,000 to $9,950,000.“We had it on the market for seven months,” Mr Kollosche said.“We had an offer for $11 million but the approval didn’t come through.” FREE: Get the latest real estate news direct to your inbox here. 3250/23 Ferny Avenue, Surfers Paradise.Adjacent to the formal dining for 12 or more is a cigar and wine tasting area, flanked by integrated wine fridges behind smoky glass. The kitchen features a long breakfast bar of Diana Royal marble with a full array of top-range Miele appliances. The gym area at 3250/23 Ferny Avenue, Surfers Paradise.A mirror-lined stairwell, illuminated by an exquisite crystal chandelier, leads up to a casual entertaining lounge with teppanyaki barbecue, billiards area, gymnasium and sauna at rooftop level. Mr Kollosche said: “I have had the pleasure of selling some of the best prestige properties on the Gold Coast for almost 20 years and can honestly say I have never seen a penthouse that comes close to rivalling this property”. Follow Reshni Ratnam on Twitterlast_img read more

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Well that’s depressing! Homes in New York are more affordable than those in Brisbane

first_imgA new survey has found Hong Kong has the world’s most expensive housing market.More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus21 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market21 hours agoThe survey found Australia has the highest number of severely unaffordable housing markets, with homes in five of its major cities and 15 other housing markets costing more than five times the annual median household income.In Sydney, a home costs on average 12.9 times the median income.Melbourne, Sunshine Coast, Gold Coast, Geelong, Adelaide, Brisbane, Hobart, Perth, Cairns and Canberra are all near the top of the list. Demographia has released its latest international housing affordability survey.The survey’s authors Wendell Cox and Hugh Pavletich said the housing markets rated ‘severely unaffordable’ had more restrictive land use regulation, usually “urban containment”.“Australia is perhaps the least densely populated major country in the world, but state governments there have contrived to drive land prices in major urban areas to very high levels, with the result that in that country housing in major state capitals has become severely unaffordable,” the report stated. A new survey has found Sydney has the second most expensive housing market in the world. Picture: Jenny Evans. Source: Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey 2018.MONEY PIT MANSION FOR SALEBrisbane is ranked the 18th least affordable major city, with homes there costing 6.3 times the median income.In comparison, homes in New York cost 5.7 times the median annual household income.center_img A new survey has found Brisbane’s housing market is more affordable than New York’s.IT IS cheaper to buy a home in New York than it is in Brisbane, according to a new global study that ranks every one of Australia’s major housing markets as ‘severely unaffordable’.International housing affordability think tank Demographia has released its 14th survey on house prices, revealing Sydney has the second most expensive housing market in the world after Hong Kong.GET THE LATEST REAL ESTATE NEWS DIRECT TO YOUR INBOX HERE A new survey has found Brisbane’s housing market is more affordable than New York’s.Looking at smaller non-major cities, the Sunshine Coast and Gold Coast fare poorly, with housing costs around nine times the median income.The survey takes in prices from the third quarter of 2017 and compares average home prices to median income, taking in 92 major cities and 293 areas in nine countries.It found Ireland and the United States have the most affordable housing markets, while Hong Kong, Australia and New Zealand have the most expensive.$120K HOME SELLS FOR $3M PLUSlast_img read more

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