Power outage darkens campus

first_imgA power outage across campus left several dorms and classrooms in the dark Wednesday morning, but campus officials have not yet determined the cause, according to an email from Paul Kempf, director of utilities and maintenance.The email was sent to building managers and rectors Wednesday afternoon.“While performing a minor maintenance activity this morning at our electrical substation an unexpected and currently unexplained anomaly resulted in the loss of our interconnect with the grid,” Kempf said in the email. “The result of this loss required the shedding of electrical loads affecting a portion of campus. Our systems are currently stable, but the cause of the issue still remains unexplained.”University spokesman Dennis Brown said only parts of campus were affected by the power outage, which began just before 9:30 a.m.“About 50 percent of the campus was without power for 10 minutes,” Brown said.Workers were scheduled to investigate the cause of the outage by testing the electrical system after 9 p.m. Wednesday, which would cause “some risk of a repeat occurrence,” Kempf said in the email. He told The Observer on Wednesday night another outage was not expected.“The problem we had this morning isn’t totally explained yet,” Kempf said. “… We’re trying to avoid the disruption to classes, and this evening is when we’re trying to work on it.”Breen-Phillips, Farley, Zahm, Cavanaugh, Alumni, Pangborn, Dillon, Lyons, Carroll, Duncan, Welsh Family, McGlinn and O’Neill were reportedly among the affected dorms, according to hall residents.The outage went unnoticed by some West Quad residents because of backup generators kicking in, according to students.“We had backup generators so it was pretty hard to notice,” junior Thom Behrens, a Duncan Hall resident, said. Junior Kyle McCaffery said generators also supplied electricity to O’Neill Hall during the outage.The Hayes-Healy Center and O’Shaughnessy, Galvin, and Geddes Halls lost power, according to students present in the buildings during the outage. DeBartolo Hall was not affected.Brown said Main Building and the Joyce Athletic and Convocation Center also lost power.Rectors cautioned their residents to take precautions throughout Wednesday night’s testing period.“As tests are conducted this evening, the campus may experience rolling power outages after 9 p.m.,” Morrissey rector Ronald Vierling said in an email sent to the hall.In the event of a second outage, “your ID [cards] will not be able to swipe you into any building,” Elaine DeBassige, Farley Hall rector, said in an email to residents.Kempf advised students to limit their use of electronics Wednesday night.“If you’re doing something and you don’t necessarily need to have it on after nine o’clock, you can turn it off,” he said.Brown said the outage was not related to the Aug. 20 partial collapse of a cooling cell in the University’s steam generation system, which provides cool water and air conditioning to campus.Tags: blackout, Dennis Brown, electricity, Paul Kempf, power outage, residence halls, utilitieslast_img read more

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Uruguayan and U.S. Air Forces Cooperate on Aircraft Maintenance Issues

first_imgThe FAU participates in international operations, as it’s deploying Bell 12 helicopters to the support the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, according to Maj. Gestido. It is “pleasing [to FAU pilots] to have completed important and complex missions, such as retrieving a helicopter from Africa to be refurbished in Uruguay, and having brought two aircraft from Portugal.” International missions The FAU provides maintenance professionals with the best training while adhering to environmental regulations. “The Uruguayan Air Force’s maintenance service has some sections certified by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 9001:2008, the quality management system,” Maj. Gestido said. The Uruguayan Armed Forces have a history of cooperating with the United States, a valued partner nation. “We are always receiving training courses or visits from U.S. personnel,” Col. Gurbindo said . “For Uruguay to participate in joint activities with [other Armed Forces] that are on the first level is very enriching. Maintaining a high, constant level of training of our staff in both the technology we have today and in future technologies would be excellent.” Twenty officers from the Uruguayan Air Force (FAU) met with U.S. Air Force representatives Major John Ware and Master Sergeant Noel Mendoza on the grounds of the FAU’s Maintenance Service Team in Montevideo from February 29th-March 4th. The Uruguayan officers also reinforced their professional relationships by talking to their U.S. counterparts about quality control sub-programs, emergency procedures in maintaining aircraft, evaluation and inspection guidelines from the quality control program, and the maintenance standardization and evaluation program. Officials from the two Air Forces will discuss logistics when the nations meet in the Uruguayan capital from April 4th-8th. “Our personnel left very happy with the level, the topics discussed, and the way in which the U.S. Air Force instructors explained things,” Maj. Gestido said. “The camaraderie was excellent.” During the conference, Maj. Ware and Master Sgt. Mendoza met with members from FAU’s Air Brigade I, Air Brigade II, Maintenance Service, and Supply Service to discuss how to enhance aircraft maintenance and quality control. From January 1st-August 18th, the FAU’s maintenance team repaired turbines for Bell 212 and UH-1H helicopters and A-37 and C-212 planes; overhauled landing gear for C-212 and T-260 aircraft; dynamically balanced the propellers of C-95, C-212, AT-95 and U206H aircraft; balanced other rotors and turbines; and weighed aircraft, according to the Máquina de Combate website. The meeting’s goal was “to fortify and exchange techniques necessary to raise the level of quality control and maintenance so that our aircraft may sail easily through the air to accomplish their assigned missions,” Aviation Major Álvaro Gestido, Chief of the Propulsion Device Section of the FAU’s Maintenance Service, told Diálogo. Maintaining the FAU’s fleet is crucial because the amount of time Air Force pilots spend flying. “We [flew] 12,350 hours last year [2015], maintaining a certain level of regular activity while also slowly beginning to increase the number of airplanes available, despite their number of years in service and the consequent increase in their operating costs,” General Alberto Zanelli, the FAU’s chief, stated on March 17th during a ceremony commemorating the 103rd anniversary of the Day of the Air Force, according to an FAU press release. Colonel Guillermo Gurbindo, an FAU spokesman, agreed. “The FAU’s aircraft are the material support upon which strategies are formed and, as a consequence, security operations, which combat threats, furnish help during humanitarian operations, control air space, and help the Armed Forces themselves to cooperate. Qualified and well-trained human resources also form a country’s Air Force.” By Dialogo March 30, 2016last_img read more

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Senate panel passes UCC bill

first_imgSenate panel passes UCC bill The Senate Judiciary recently moved a bill designed to fix technical errors in legislation passed a year ago revising Art. 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code, governing the process of establishing and foreclosing liens against personal property.Sen. Skip Campbell, D- Tamarac, said SB 1066 is primarily a glitch bill to correct technical errors clarifying sections with fixture filings.“It also clarifies questions that have been raised with respect to proceeds from the sale of homestead property,” Campbell said.“The clarifying language makes it clear the pledge of accounts does not include the proceeds of the sale of a homestead property unless there is a specific description and a security or pledge agreement adjoiner by a spouse. This is consistent with Florida law with respect to homestead property.”This bill, developed by the Business Law and Real Property Probate and Trust Law sections of the Bar, also has been referred to the Senate Banking and Insurance, Appropriations Subcommittee on General Government, and Appropriations committees. Its companion in the House, HB 1669, was approved February 14 by the Council for Smarter Government. Senate panel passes UCC billcenter_img March 1, 2002 Regular Newslast_img read more

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How to keep your body (and wallet) healthy during cold and flu season

first_imgIt’s that time of year. You go to bed feeling great and you wake up like you’ve been hit by a truck. Then you spend the next week pumping yourself full of “the nighttime, sniffling, sneezing, aching, coughing, stuffy-head, fever, so you can rest medicine.” Sometimes a little Nyquil is enough, but often, the remedy isn’t that simple (or cheap). After a visit to the doctor and a bag of medicine from the pharmacy, your wallet really can take a hit. If you’re not prepared for the cold and flu season ahead, here a few things you can do to keep your body and your wallet in good shape . . .Wash your hands (a lot): I worked at a restaurant right out of college, and that helped me get in the habit of frequent hand washings. When you’re in public, you never know who is sick and what they’ve touched. Wash your hands thoroughly when you have the opportunity, and have some Purell handy when you’re on the go.Boost your immune system: Your body fights hard to keep you healthy, but sometimes you need to give it some extra assistance. It’s a great idea to up your intake of Vitamin C and Zinc, and make sure your diet includes substantial amounts of protein as well. Supplements like Emergen-C and Airborne are great things to keep around the house.Get a flu shot: Nobody likes getting shots, but having the flu isn’t a great alternative. Flu shots are often available at your local pharmacy/drug store for $10-$20, which is a small price to pay to not feel awful. If you need a vaccine, here’s a helpful Vaccine Locator you can use to find options in your area. 70SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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3 tips for improving your finances while you’re stuck at home

first_imgBeing under quarantine can be a big headache for all of us, but especially those aren’t able to work from home. For those of us fortunate enough to be able to do our jobs from home offices, this is the perfect time to improve our financial situation. Whether your wallet is struggling right now or not, here are three tips for improving our finances while we’re stuck at home…Give you emergency fund a boost: Even if you’re still working, having a nice emergency fund on hand is super important, because who knows what the future is going to hold. You may have a lot saved up, but you’d hate to see your savings dwindle dramatically over the next few months. One way to boost those accounts is to figure up the amount of money you aren’t having to spend right now(kids activities, sports, dining out) and transfer that money into your emergency fund. If you don’t need to spend it, you should definitely save it.Go easy on the bulk spending: You don’t need all of that toilet paper. While it’s nice to have enough stuff to stay home for 2-3 weeks, having a 6 month’s supply of everything is a little much. Feel free to stock up, but save some for everyone else. Sure, you might use up your stock of toilet paper eventually, but you’re bound to end up wasting something when you’ve planned way too far ahead.Ask for help: Even if you’re still working, money might get a little tight. Maybe your job translates to a home office, but your spouse doesn’t have that advantage. If this is the case, you may want to inventory your bills. Figure out which bills are absolutely necessary and make sure to pay those first. If you need to, contact your credit card company or student lender and see if they have any ways to help you find a little relief for the next couple of months. 197SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

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Danijela Cavlovic new reinforcement in Manjgura

first_imgUnfortunately, Croatian tourism has “lost” another ambassador of Croatian tourism and a real host in family accommodation.Danijela Čavlović, better known to the general public as the owner of the first bed & breakfast capacity in Zagreb, Studio Kairos, as well as the president of the Family Tourism Association at the Croatian Chamber of Commerce, has recently joined one of the oldest Croatian public relations agencies.Danijela is coming to Manjgur to the position of senior advisor where she will be in charge of clients from the tourism, pharmaceutical and investment sectors. “Working in tourism I managed to set some new standards in the domestic hospitality industry, but after six years of running my own business, it was time for a new cycle. Given that I have many years of work in newsrooms, agencies, corporations, entrepreneurship and the public sector, I believe that I will contribute to Manjgura’s team with my rich experience.“Pointed out Danijela, who until recently was also the president of the Family Tourism Association at the Croatian Chamber of Commerce.Manjgura is a public relations and strategic consulting agency that has been providing services in the field of corporate relations, B20B and B2C communication, crisis communication and political marketing for 2 years.last_img read more

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In Indian capital, riots deepen a Hindu-Muslim divide

first_imgFor years, Hindus and Muslims lived and worked peacefully together in Yamuna Vihar, a densely populated Delhi district.But the riots that raged through the district last month appear to have cleaved lasting divisions in the community, reflecting a nationwide trend as tensions over the Hindu nationalist agenda of Prime Minister Narendra Modi boil over.Many Hindus in Yamuna Vihar, a sprawl of residential blocks and shops dotted with mosques and Hindu temples, and in other riot-hit districts of northeast Delhi, say they are boycotting merchants and refusing to hire workers from the Muslim community. Muslims say they are scrambling to find jobs at a time when the coronavirus pandemic has heightened pressure on India’s economy. “We have proof to show that Muslims started the violence, and now they are blaming it on us,” Dhingra said. “This is their pattern as they are criminal-minded people.”Those views were widely echoed in interviews with 25 Hindus in eight localities in northeast Delhi, many of whom suffered large-scale financial damages or were injured in the riots. Reuters also spoke with about 30 Muslims, most of whom said that Hindus had decided to stop working with them.Suman Goel, a 45-year-old housewife who has lived among Muslim neighbours for 23 years, said the violence had left her in a state of shock.”It’s strange to lose a sense of belonging, to step out of your home and avoid smiling at Muslim women,” she said. “They must be feeling the same too but it’s best to maintain a distance.”Mohammed Taslim, a Muslim who operated a business selling shoes from a shop owned by a Hindu in Bhajanpura, one of the neighbourhoods affected by the riots, said his inventory was destroyed by a Hindu mob.He was then evicted and his space was leased out to a Hindu businessman, he said.”This is being done just because I am a Muslim,” said Taslim.Many Muslims said the attack had been instigated by hardline Hindus to counter protests involving tens of thousands of people across India against the new citizenship law.”This is the new normal for us,” said Adil, a Muslim research assistant with an economic think tank in central Delhi. “Careers, jobs and business are no more a priority for us. Our priority now is to be safe and to protect our lives.”He declined to disclose his full name for fear of reprisals.Emboldened by Modi’s landslide electoral victory in 2014, hardline groups began pursuing a Hindu-first agenda that has come at the expense of the country’s Muslim minority.Vigilantes have attacked and killed a number of Muslims involved in transporting cows, which are seen as holy animals by Hindus, to slaughterhouses in recent years. The government has also adopted a tough stance with regard to Pakistan, and in August withdrew semi-autonomous privileges for Jammu and Kashmir, India’s only Muslim-majority state.In November, the Supreme Court ruled that a Hindu temple could be built at Ayodhya, where a right-wing mob tore down a 16th-century mosque in 1992, a decision that was welcomed by the Modi government.The citizenship law, which eases the path for non-Muslims from neighbouring Muslim-majority nations to gain citizenship in India, was the final straw for many Muslims, as well as secular Indians, sparking nationwide protests.Modi’s office did not respond to questions from Reuters about the latest violence.Night Vigilantes During the day, Hindus and Muslims shun each other in the alleys of the Delhi districts that were hardest hit by the unrest in February. At night, when the threat of violence is greater, they are physically divided by barricades that are removed in the morning.And in some areas, permanent barriers are being erected.On a recent evening, Tarannum Sheikh, a schoolteacher, sat watching two welders install a high gate at the entrance of a narrow lane to the Muslim enclave of Khajuri Khas, where she lives. The aim was to keep Hindus out, she said.”We keep wooden batons with us to protect the entrance as at any time, someone can enter this alley to create trouble,” she said. “We do not trust the police anymore.”In the adjacent Hindu neighbourhood of Bhajanpura, residents expressed a similar mistrust and sense of insecurity.”In a way these riots were needed to unite Hindus, we did not realise that we were surrounded by such evil minds for decades,” said Santosh Rani, a 52-year-old grandmother.She said she had been forced to lower her two grandchildren from the first floor of her house to the street below after the building was torched in the violence, allegedly by a Muslim.”This time the Muslims have tested our patience and now we will never give them jobs,” said Rani who owns several factories and retail shops. “I will never forgive them.”Hasan Sheikh, a tailor who has stitched clothing for Hindu and Muslim women for over 40 years, said Hindu customers came to collect their unstitched clothes after the riots.”It was strange to see how our relationship ended,” said Sheikh, who is Muslim. “I was not at fault, nor were my women clients, but the social climate of this area is very tense. Hatred on both sides is justified.”Topics : “I have decided to never work with Muslims,” said Yash Dhingra, who has a shop selling paint and bathroom fittings in Yamuna Vihar. “I have identified new workers, they are Hindus,” he said, standing in a narrow lane that was the scene of violent clashes in the riots that erupted on Feb. 23.The trigger for the riots, the worst sectarian violence in the Indian capital in decades, was a citizenship law introduced last year that critics say marginalises India’s Muslim minority. Police records show at least 53 people, mostly Muslims, were killed and more than 200 were injured.Dhingra said the unrest had forever changed Yamuna Vihar. Gutted homes with broken doors can be seen across the neighbourhood; electricity cables melted in the fires dangle dangerously above alleys strewn with stones and bricks used as makeshift weapons in the riots.Most Hindu residents in the district are now boycotting Muslim workers, affecting everyone from cooks and cleaners to mechanics and fruit sellers, he said.last_img read more

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Inmate back in custody after mistakenly being released by judge

first_imgAuthorities in Brevard County, Florida are reporting that an inmate who was mistakenly released after being transferred to another jail, is back in police custody.29-year-old Cedrick Gant turned himself back in to police on Monday after a judge released him despite his 23 year federal prison sentence for armed carjacking.Gant was sentenced to the term in February, however, transferred from the Lake County Jail to the Brevard County Jail last week to face sentencing on a violation of probation charge in a separate case, the judge credited him for time served and released him.According  to Brevard County Sheriff’s spokesman Tod Goodyear, there was a miscommunication between departments and his does not know why the Brevard judge didn’t know about the federal sentence.An internal investigation is ongoing.last_img read more

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While emerging offensively, Taurean Thompson remains unproven on defense

first_imgAfter St. John’s scored 12 straight points, Syracuse needed to answer on the offensive end. The Orange had already burned two timeouts as it sputtered in the first 12 minutes of the game.Taurean Thompson caught a pass while posting up on Kassoum Yakwe. He took two dribbles, spun over his right shoulder, past Yakwe, and easily scored a lefty layup. If only for a moment, Thompson stopped SU’s bleeding.But on the Red Storm’s next possession, Bashir Ahmed received an entry pass in the paint and finished a layup in the core of Syracuse’s defense. Thompson, playing center at the time, not only couldn’t defend Ahmed, but he also fouled the 6-foot-7 St. John’s junior.The 25-second sequence reflected Thompson’s adjustment to the college game.The freshman has thrived on offense, providing a versatile threat in the paint. But defensively, he’s still learning the nuances of Syracuse (7-5) head coach Jim Boeheim’s 2-3 zone. After beginning the year exclusively at forward, he’s played more and more at center over the past four games. His transition to the new position has been iffy.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“He’s OK. He’s no worse (defensively) than anybody else,” Boeheim said of Thompson. “He’s a better offensive player than anybody else (down low).”In Syracuse’s past four games, Thompson is averaging 13 points and 21.3 minutes while shooting 21-of-33 from the field. Thompson’s offensive breakout might be the biggest bright spot for SU as it flounders in unchartered territory with five nonconference losses for the first time in program history.Thompson has even hit two 3-pointers in the past four games, a testament to his ability to stretch the floor and be a threat from several different locations. Against Eastern Michigan on Monday, he commanded the game from the high-post position, finishing with 11 points and five assists.“He just did a great job of making the right decision,” EMU head coach Rob Murphy said. “Took the short jumper. Made it. Drop down pass to a teammate. He also passed it out and was able to drive the ball as well.”Thompson, though, is still adjusting on the defensive end. Over the past five games, the 6-foot-10 Thompson has played at center for 45 percent of Syracuse’s games, 3 percent more than starting center Dajuan Coleman, per Kenpom.com.Jacob Greenfeld | Asst. Photo EditorHe fouled out against St. John’s with eight minutes left, a result of often being caught out of position inside. And after Syracuse beat North Florida by six points on Dec. 3, Boeheim said “he’s got to get better” as an interior defender.Thompson played man-to-man defense “100 percent” of the time in high school. He began the season playing and practicing only at forward and struggled to rotate quick enough. As the season progressed and he began getting more minutes at center, his mindset also began to change.He used to view scoring just two points as a bad game. What Thompson said he’s starting to realize is having four blocks and 10 rebounds can also qualify as a solid performance, even if he didn’t score much.Despite Thompson’s defensive struggles, he ranks 67th nationally in block percentage at 8 percent, per Kenpom, meaning the rate at which he blocks two-point shots based on the number of minutes he plays.“As a big man, you just have to anchor the defense,” Thompson said, “you have to block shots, they look for you to rebound, just be a presence down there. We’re the core of the defense.”Against Georgetown on Dec. 17, the Hoyas placed one offensive player near the free-throw line and another along the baseline under the basket. That forced Thompson to play in between the two of them and put him in a tricky spot when he had to guard both at the same time. He said it was tough playing center against the alignment without much previous experience.At forward, Thompson had to use his length and athleticism more often as he slid out to the wings, something he was often slow to do, which allowed open 3-point attempts. Playing center requires him to be more physical as he defends against picks and seals set by opposing bigs.What Thompson brings to Syracuse offensively is the reason he’s garnered playing time. If he can improve on the defensive end, his minutes could increase even more.“I don’t think it’s really a freshman thing, I just think it’s just like a consistent thing,” Thompson said. “You have to be committed to being a good defender.” Comments Published on December 24, 2016 at 3:11 pm Contact Paul: pmschwed@syr.edu | @pschweds Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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Water polo sweeps weekend matchups

first_imgThe team is on a roll and feeling optimistic about its future, but it remains focused on improving various aspects of its game moving forward, particularly defense. No. 5 USC men’s water polo earned two more tough wins over the weekend, defeating No. 13 UC Irvine 16-10 at home Saturday before narrowly beating No. 4 UC Santa Barbara 10-9 on the road Sunday. Saturday’s game against UC Irvine was a dominant showing by the Trojans on both ends of the pool. USC put up 8 goals in the first half to just 1 from UCI. The Trojans would not relinquish the commanding lead in the second half, despite a fourth-quarter surge from UCI that saw the Anteaters put six shots in the back of the net. However, the Anteaters never came within striking distance of the Trojans, who captured the 16-10 victory. “It’s a testament, really, to the way he trains and his attitude,” Porter said. “He’s a great training partner, and together we make a really great goalie team … I can’t speak highly enough of him and his performance.” “It feels great to finish [the weekend] with two wins … That’s really going to give us a lot of confidence heading into the rest of the season and the postseason,” Porter said. “[But] we can always improve on our defense. That’s our team philosophy … It’s something that can never be perfect, so we’ll try to get to as close to that as we can.” The Trojans now sit at 9-2, holding a four-game win streak and remaining undefeated at home this season. Junior driver Jacob Mercep tallied 4 goals Saturday and 3 more Sunday, leading the Trojans with a total of 7 on the 2-0 weekend.  (JoDanielle Esteban | Daily Trojan) Sunday’s game in Santa Barbara was a much more evenly matched affair than Saturday’s. The Trojans jumped out to a 4-2 lead in the first period but surrendered that advantage after 3 consecutive goals by the Gauchos to begin the second frame. USC equalized before the end of the half, however, and the two teams went into the third tied at 5 goals apiece. The third quarter saw a series of lead changes as USC went down a goal, scored 2 straight goals to take the lead, gave up another 2 to UCSB and finally tied the score at 8 as the third period came to a close.  The USC offense fired on all cylinders against Irvine. Junior driver Jacob Mercep led the team with 4 goals while nine different Trojans scored at least once in the contest. The defense was bolstered by junior goalie Vaios Vlahotasios, who recorded a career-best 15 saves. USC has only lost twice this season, with one of those losses coming at the hands of Santa Barbara in mid-September. The team kept the frustration of that defeat in mind heading into Sunday’s contest. “We were pretty disappointed to pick up our first loss of the season to them, so that was definitely a motivating factor for us,” Porter said. “Full credit to them. It was their home pool, they came with a lot of energy and played a great game … but I guess we wanted it more in the end, and that’s why we got the result.” Vlahotasios’ fellow goalie, sophomore Nic Porter, complimented his teammate’s play after Saturday’s game. In the first minute of the final period, the Trojans once again jumped out to a 1-goal lead, but Santa Barbara quickly answered back with a goal of its own. Then, with under seven minutes remaining in the game, sophomore two-meter Jake Ehrhardt put away USC’s 10th and final goal. After Porter blocked a last-minute shot attempt by UCSB junior attacker Cole Brosnan, the Trojans played keep-away to run out the clock en route to a 10-9 victory. The Trojans will have the chance to avenge their only other loss of the season as they take on Pacific Oct. 12 in Stockton, Calif.last_img read more

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