Flexing AI Workloads Using KubeFlow and OpenShift Container Platform

first_imgWant to create a flexible environment for machine learning and deep learning workloads? Deploy Kubeflow on an OpenShift Container platform with Dell EMC PowerEdge servers.Many enterprises invest in custom infrastructure to support artificial intelligence (AI) and their data science teams. While the goal is right, this approach can be a problem. Oftentimes, these ad-hoc hardware implementations live outside of the mainstream data center, and that can limit adoption.To facilitate wider adoption of AI-driven applications in the enterprise, organizations can integrate production-grade, experimental AI technologies in already well-defined platforms. That’s the idea behind Kubeflow: The Machine learning Toolkit for Kubernetes.Kubeflow is an open-source Kubernetes-native platform to accelerate machine learning (ML) projects. It’s a composable, scalable, portable stack that includes the components and automation features you need to integrate ML tools. These tools work together to create a cohesive machine learning pipeline to deploy and operationalize ML applications at scale.A proven platform for KubeflowKubeflow requires a Kubernetes environment, such as Google Kubernetes Engine or Red Hat OpenShift. To help your organization meet this need, Dell EMC and Red Hat offer a proven platform design that provides accelerated delivery of stateless and stateful cloud-native applications using enterprise-grade container orchestration.This enterprise-ready architecture serves as the foundation for building a robust, high-performance environment that supports various lifecycle stages of an AI project: model development using Jupyter Notebooks, rapid iteration and testing using Tensorflow, training deep learning (DL) models using graphics processing units (GPUs), and enabling prediction using developed models.Among other advantages:Running ML workloads in the same environment as the rest of your company’s applications reduces IT complexity.Using Kubernetes as the underlying platform makes it easier for your ML engineers to develop a model locally using readily accessible development systems, such as laptop computers, before deploying the application to a production cloud-native environment.To learn moreReady for a deeper dive? To learn more, check out these resources.Streamline your Machine Learning Projects on OpenShift Container Platform v3.11 using KubeflowLearn how to accelerate your ML/DL projects using Kubeflow and NVIDIA GPUs: Executing ML/DL Workloads using OpenShift Container Platform v3.11 white paperGain design guidance for implementing the OpenShift Container Platform on Dell EMC infrastructure: Dell EMC Ready Architecture for Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform v3.11 Architecture Guidelast_img read more

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Expanding Our Edge Portfolio for Modern Software-Defined Networking

first_imgAs MWC19 Los Angeles kicks off today, our team at Dell Technologies has been getting ready for the conference which is slated to be dominated by advancements in 5G, AI, IoT, and advances in technology for the automotive and media industries.As these next-generation technologies develop, our service provider and enterprise customers are having to modernize infrastructure from the data center all the way out to the network edge for enabling innovation, controlling costs, reducing complexity and providing scalability.Last year, my team and I at Dell Technologies announced the Dell EMC Virtual Edge Platform (VEP) family that expands edge service delivery options and helps customers modernize network operations via universal Customer Premise Equipment (uCPE).We’ve expanded upon that promise by introducing a new member to that product family. The Dell EMC VEP1405 series connects the enterprise to the edge via universal Customer Premise Equipment (uCPE), uniting branch locations to the cloud and complementing its larger VEP4600 predecessor.As a uCPE device, both service providers and enterprises can future-proof network operations and save on capital expenditures by shifting numerous, dedicated proprietary physical appliances to this single platform to host various virtual network functions (VNFs) such as software-defined wide area network (SD-WAN), firewall, deep-packet inspection and routing.Using software-defined architecture, virtualization, open standards and APIs, service providers and enterprises can accelerate their digital transformation goals to take advantage of new market opportunities more quickly and efficiently. With the VEP1405, we can help our customers build out their infrastructure of the future by offering software-defined networking at the edge in a very small, affordable package that offers flexibility.The compact fixed form-factor of the VEP1405 uses Intel® Atom® C-3000 x86-based processor – a purpose-built networking processor supporting Intel® Quick Assist Technology and Intel® Data Plane Development Kit to accelerate encryption and packet processing respectively – that is intended for value, lower power consumption and multiple core options.Additional highlights of VEP1405 include:Validation for ADVA Ensemble software which provides a choice from among 50+ virtual network functions for operational flexibility.Additional mobile connection capabilities offered with Wi-Fi for areas with power but without hard-wired connections.Consistent VNF behavior and customer experience between the VEP1405 and VEP4600, aiding faster time to revenue and reduced deployment risks.Sold and supported globally with Dell EMC Services and world-class supply chain.VEP1405 is now globally available. If your organization needs software-defined networking at the Edge in a small, affordable package, you can get more VEP1405 details here.last_img read more

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US economy shrank 3.5% in 2020 after growing 4% last quarter

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — Stuck in the grip of a viral pandemic, the U.S. economy grew at a 4% annual rate in the final three months of 2020 and shrank last year by the largest amount in 74 years. For 2020 as a whole, a year when the coronavirus inflicted the worst economic freeze since the end of World War II, the economy contracted 3.5% and clouded the outlook for the coming year. The economic damage followed the eruption of the pandemic 10 months ago and the deep recession it triggered, with tens of millions of Americans left jobless.last_img read more

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Ex-FBI lawyer given probation for Russia probe actions

first_imgWASHINGTON (AP) — A former FBI lawyer has been sentenced to probation for altering an email the Justice Department relied on during its surveillance of an aide to President Donald Trump during the Russia investigation. Kevin Clinesmith at his sentencing hearing Friday apologized for doctoring the email about Carter Page’s relationship with the CIA. He said he was “truly ashamed” of what he had done. Prosecutors sought several months in prison for Clinesmith, but the judge said Clinesmith’s action was the only stain on his record and that he had already endured public vilification. The sentence is likely to disappoint Trump supporters, who claim the Russia probe was a witch hunt. The investigation resulted in charges against six Trump associates.last_img read more

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Police: Rapper Silento charged with murder in shooting death

first_imgATLANTA (AP) — Authorities say the Atlanta rapper Silento has been arrested and charged with murder in the January shooting death of his 34-year-old cousin. Police in the Atlanta suburb of DeKalb County said Monday that the rapper whose legal name is Ricky Hawk was arrested and booked into jail. A police statement said he’s charged with murder in the Jan. 21 death of Frederick Rooks. Silento is known for his hit viral dance song “Watch Me (Whip/Nae Nae).” It wasn’t immediately known if Hawk had an attorney who could comment for him.last_img read more

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Tigray opposition parties assert 50,000-plus civilian deaths

first_imgNAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — A trio of opposition parties in Ethiopia’s embattled Tigray region estimates that more than 50,000 civilians have been killed in the three-month conflict, and they urge the international community to intervene before a “humanitarian disaster of biblical proportion will become a gruesome reality.” The statement does not say where the estimate comes from. No official death toll has emerged since the fighting began in early November between Ethiopian and allied forces and those of the Tigray region. Civilians have been dying from targeted attacks, crossfire and disease. New Tigray administrators appointed by Ethiopia have even warned people are starving to death.last_img read more

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Ex-ECB’s Draghi positioned to lead Italy after politics fail

first_imgROME (AP) — The president of Italy has summoned former European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi to a Wednesday meeting after announcing he wants the quick formation of a non-political government to lead Italy during the coronavirus pandemic. Addressing the nation Tuesday night, President Sergio Mattarella said negotiations to try to forge a new government out of the collapsed coalition of Premier Giuseppe Conte had failed. Mattarella said Italy can’t afford to suffer through a months-long campaign for parliamentary elections during the pandemic. He appealed to all parties to support formation of a non-political government. The 73-year-old Draghi was credited with a crucial role in saving Europe’s single currency, the euro.last_img read more

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Notre Dame student government in brief

first_imgGraduate Student Union The Graduate Student Union (GSU) has achieved several goals this semester, including changing its constitution, planning social events and coordinating a graduate research symposium, president Victoria Froude said. One of the group’s major achievements this year was passing the non-discrimination clause that was added to the GSU constitution, Froude said. Froude said the GSU has coordinated several social events. GSU is also planning its third annual Graduate Research Symposium, which will take place Feb. 4, Froude said. The group’s main goals involve improving graduate student life in general. “This year, we have focused on improving funding opportunities for graduate students, support and inclusion for international students and a family friendly policy for students with spouses and children,”���Froude said. Club Coordination Council The Club Coordination Council (CCC) allocated funds to clubs for this semester and will organize a much smaller winter reallocation of funds for next semester, president Kayla Delgado said. Clubs applied for funds last spring during the spring allocation process, Delgado said. “We get requests for more money than we receive from the Financial Management Board, but we do the best that we can to [help] the clubs,” CCC member Lauren Dugas said. Clubs can apply for more funds either through participation in winter reallocation or by appealing for funds for specific events,” Delgado said. “There is a winter reallocation process in which we do have the opportunity to allocate additional funds to clubs who apply,” Delgado said. There are two appeal funds controlled by the CCC, Delgado said. One is for clubs who have unexpected expenses with a specific event and the other is for clubs collaborating to put on an event. Financial Management Board The Financial Management Board (FMB) approved the allocation of funds to student groups for the 2010-2011 academic year, and will coordinate a reallocation of funds for the spring semester, Student Union Treasurer Sarah Hurtubise said. FMB monitors the financial activity of student organizations, as well as the distribution of funds for The Shirt Charity Fund. The Board must approve any events or expenses over $5,000. Hurtubise said not many changes have taken place this year regarding the allocation of funds. However, Hall Presidents Council did receive $1,000 more funding than last year because of the addition of Ryan Hall, she said. Hurtubise said the Off-Campus Council altered its constitution this year, making improvements from previous years. “We have a slightly bigger pool for winter reallocations, so we’re looking forward to helping out some more groups,” she said. Hurtubise said groups will soon give presentations to the Financial Management Board about why they need additional funds, and decisions about reallocation will be made from there. Hall Presidents Council Hall Presidents’ Council (HPC) has continued to improve pep rallies and promote dorm participation in the rallies this year, HPC executive co-chair Alexa Doyle said. The Council worked closely with student government and the University administration to improve the rallies, Doyle said. “We asked the hall presidents what their residents liked and didn’t like about the rallies,” Doyle said. “We also wanted to make it easier for people to attend the pep rallies.” HPC also oversaw dorm signature events and will continue to encourage attendance at dorm events for the remainder of the year. Doyle said HPC will do so through increased advertising and brother-sister dorm interaction for the remainder of the year. She said attendance increased at dorm events because of brother and sister dorms attending each other’s events. “HPC is an integral link to most of the student body,” Doyle said. “We want to use it as an outlet to make dorm events more well known and well attended.” Senior Class Council The Senior Class Council spent the first part of the semester focusing on community relations. Senior Class president Kate Clitheroe said the Council partnered with the Career Center to host a barbeque at the beginning of the semester. Clitheroe said the Council is planning a February service and networking event in Chicago, as well as a Press Box Dinner. “I am proud of the Senior Class Council’s commitment,” Clitheroe said. “Most events next semester will focus on post-graduate needs, including networking and establishing a way to keep in contact [with one another]. “And Senior Week planning is in full swing.” Junior Class Council The Junior Class Council found success in their philanthropy committee so far this year, class president James J. Ward said. The Council provided class members with the opportunity to raise money for flood relief in Pakistan and held the “She’s the First Campaign,” which assists underprivileged girls in attending school, Ward said. Ward said the junior class can expect more social events off campus next semester, including a dance called the “Chicago Ball,” to take place in downtown Chicago. “I’m really happy that we’ve managed to get the class to come to so many of our events even though half of their friends are abroad,” Ward said. Sophomore Class Council The Sophomore Class Council held the first ever Domecoming Week, full of class activities, class president Brett Rocheleau said. The week included a dodgeball tournament and a “Domecoming” dance that over 600 sophomores attended. The Council also hosted other events, including a Christmas party with kids from the Center for the Homeless, a class rosary and a class Mass. The Council is planning an ice skating event, as well as a poker tournament, for second semester. “Hopefully we will continue to have an event ever other week in the second semester,” Rocheleau said. Freshman Class Council Members of the Freshman Class Council used the first semester to adjust to student government and to host fundraising, social and service events, class president Heather Eaton said. The Council co-hosted the Yule Ball dance with the Sophomore Class Council and is currently in the process of selling their first piece of class apparel to students. Members are planning many events for second semester, including an informal forum on the topic of spirituality, a class Mass and selling Class of 2014 merchandise. “I am so proud of our Council’s dedication and enthusiasm,” Eaton said.last_img read more

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OIS: Notre Dame students are safe in Cairo

first_imgAs protests continue in Egypt, the 12 Notre Dame students currently studying at the American University of Cairo (AUC) are safe, according to a Friday website update from Notre Dame’s Office of International Studies (OIS). The note, directed toward the parents of students in Cairo, said OIS heard from one of the students via telephone. While students do not have Internet or mobile phone access, AUC officials allowed them to make one-minute phone calls from land lines. “OIS has received a voicemail from one of our Cairo students, calling on behalf of all of them,” the note stated. “They are all safe at the student residence in Zamalek.” Judy Hutchinson, program coordinator of Cairo study abroad, said the students are staying in their residences. “They are instructed not to participate in or otherwise go anywhere near the protests,” Hutchinson said. According to the website note to parents, AUC officials are advising the 12 Notre Dame students. Hutchinson said there are no Notre Dame faculty or staff members with the students in Cairo. “They are obeying the curfew and, as instructed, have not ventured from their residences nor in anyway been involved in any of the protests,” the note stated. “There are AUC officials in residence at Zamalek that are there to act as advisors to our students.” The note also said OIS is monitoring events in Cairo and expects updates from the AUC New York Office.last_img read more

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Group to make beds from bags

first_imgThere is more to a plastic bag than carrying groceries, senior Monica Aguirre, president of Saint Mary’s Environmental Action Coalition (SMEAC), said. The Coalition will be collecting plastic bags to make sleeping mats and send them abroad to disaster victims and several community organizations, Aguirre said. “We plan to contact a few organizations within the South Bend community, in order to see if they will take a few completed mats and hand them out to anyone living on the streets who would be interested,” she said. “They are very lightweight and weather resistant.” SMEAC advisor Cassie Majetic, a professor of biology, said the practice is popular around the country right now. “I actually first heard about this idea over the summer from my mother, who is a teacher and Girl Scouts volunteer,” Majetic said. “Since then, we’ve found numerous examples of youth and volunteer groups doing this, and SMEAC decided they want to be a part of it.” Right now, the group is collecting plastic bags from students outside 252 Science Hall at the College until Earth Week, which is April 17 to 23. Aguirre said students will be making the mats during the week. “During Earth Week, we will host a workshop teaching interested students how to make the mats, we will provide the bags as well, each student will then be responsible for turning in the completed mats before finals week,” Aguirre said. Majetic said it is important for students to save all their bags because it takes 500 to 700 plastic bags to create one mat. “Each [plastic] bag is cut apart and the loops are tied together to make plastic yarn, which is then crocheted into a mat,” Majetic said. “Each mat requires 500 to 700 individual bags, so we need as many donations as we can get.” Aside from the bag collection, the group is also conducting a school-wide recycling survey, Aguirre said. “Well we have a recycling survey out now,” Aguirre said. “Our club hopes to discover creative, new ways we can educate the campus about how to recycle. So anyone can complete it, it just takes about five minutes.” SMEAC’s main goal is to make Saint Mary’s a more environmentally-friendly campus, she said. “The Environmental Action Coalition is a club that works to educate the campus about environmental issues,” Aguirre said. “We want people to feel that they can personally make a difference with the simple choices they make.”last_img read more

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